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Jones County is a county in the U.S. state of South Dakota. As of the 2010 census, the population was 1,006,[1] making it the least populous county in South Dakota. Its county seat is Murdo.[2] Created in 1916 and organized in 1917, it is the most recently established county in South Dakota.[3]

Jones County
Freier Round Barn
Map of South Dakota highlighting Jones County
Location within the U.S. state of South Dakota
Map of the United States highlighting South Dakota
South Dakota's location within the U.S.
Coordinates: 43°57′N 100°41′W / 43.95°N 100.69°W / 43.95; -100.69
Country United States
State South Dakota
Founded1916 (created)
January 15, 1917 (organized)
Named forGeorge Wallace Jones
SeatMurdo
Largest cityMurdo
Area
 • Total971 sq mi (2,510 km2)
 • Land970 sq mi (2,500 km2)
 • Water1.2 sq mi (3 km2)  0.1%%
Population
 • Estimate 
(2018)
928
 • Density0.96/sq mi (0.37/km2)
Time zoneUTC−6 (Central)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−5 (CDT)
Congressional districtAt-large

GeographyEdit

The terrain of Jones County consists of semi-arid rolling hills, partially devoted to agriculture. The Bad River flows northeasterly through the NW corner of the county, and the White River forms the county's southern boundary. The southern areas of the county are carved with gullies and drainages flowing to the White River.[4] The terrain generally slopes to the northeast, and its highest point is on the lower western boundary, at 2,444' (745m) ASL.[5] The county has a total area of 971 square miles (2,510 km2), of which 970 square miles (2,500 km2) is land and 1.2 square miles (3.1 km2) (0.1%) is water.[6]

The eastern portion of South Dakota's counties (48 of 66) observe Central Time; the western counties (18 of 66) observe Mountain Time. Jones County is the westernmost of the SD counties to observe Central Time.[7]

Major highwaysEdit

Adjacent countiesEdit

Protected areaEdit

Lakes[4]Edit

  • Sheriff Reservoir

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
19203,004
19303,1775.8%
19402,509−21.0%
19502,281−9.1%
19602,066−9.4%
19701,882−8.9%
19801,463−22.3%
19901,324−9.5%
20001,193−9.9%
20101,006−15.7%
Est. 2018928[8]−7.8%
US Decennial Census[9]
1790-1960[10] 1900-1990[11]
1990-2000[12] 2010-2018[1]

2000 censusEdit

As of the 2000 United States Census,[13] there were 1,193 people, 509 households, and 327 families in the county. The population density was 1.2 people per square mile (0.5/km²). There were 614 housing units at an average density of 0.6 per square mile (0.2/km²). The racial makeup of the county was 95.81% White, 2.43% Native American, 0.08% Pacific Islander, 0.17% from other races, and 1.51% from two or more races. 0.34% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 509 households out of which 29.30% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.20% were married couples living together, 7.50% had a female householder with no husband present, and 35.60% were non-families. 33.20% of all households were made up of individuals and 15.10% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.34 and the average family size was 2.98.

The county population contained 26.20% under the age of 18, 6.20% from 18 to 24, 25.50% from 25 to 44, 23.90% from 45 to 64, and 18.20% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 41 years. For every 100 females there were 103.90 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 102.80 males.

The median income for a household in the county was $30,288, and the median income for a family was $37,500. Males had a median income of $23,289 versus $17,143 for females. The per capita income for the county was $15,896. About 11.90% of families and 15.80% of the population were below the poverty line, including 27.60% of those under age 18 and 7.10% of those age 65 or over.

2010 censusEdit

As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 1,006 people, 458 households, and 280 families in the county.[14] The population density was 1.0 inhabitant per square mile (0.39/km2). There were 589 housing units at an average density of 0.6 per square mile (0.23/km2).[15] The racial makeup of the county was 95.6% white, 2.0% American Indian, 0.4% Pacific islander, 0.1% black or African American, 0.0% from other races, and 1.9% from two or more races. Those of Hispanic or Latino origin made up 1.3% of the population.[14] In terms of ancestry, 48.8% were German, 15.9% were Irish, 10.2% were Norwegian, 9.0% were Dutch, and 1.9% were American.[16] In terms of ancestry in 2016, 39.1% were of German, 14.3% were of Irish, 13.9% were of Norwegian, 11.4% were of Dutch, 6.4% were of English, 6.2 were of French.

Of the 458 households, 26.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.7% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, 38.9% were non-families, and 35.8% of all households were made up of individuals. The average household size was 2.20 and the average family size was 2.86. The median age was 46.9 years.[14]

The median income for a household in the county was $49,464 and the median income for a family was $56,589. Males had a median income of $33,021 versus $27,115 for females. The per capita income for the county was $24,630. About 6.6% of families and 9.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 16.7% of those under age 18 and 8.4% of those age 65 or over.[17]

CommunitiesEdit

CityEdit

TownEdit

Census-designated placeEdit

Unincorporated communityEdit

TownshipsEdit

  • Buffalo
  • Draper
  • Dunkel
  • Grandview
  • Kolls
  • Morga
  • Mullen
  • Mussman
  • Okaton
  • Scovil
  • South Creek
  • Williams Creek
  • Zickrick

Unorganized territoriesEdit

  • Central Jones
  • North Jones
  • Rich Valley
  • Westover

PoliticsEdit

Jones County voters have been reliably Republican. The last Democrat to carry Jones County in a Presidential election was Lyndon Johnson in 1964, and Jimmy Carter in 1976 was the last to top one third of the county’s ballots. Even before the Democratic Party turned towards its modern liberalism, Jones County did not vote for any Democrat except LBJ and Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1932 and 1936 – and in the latter election when Roosevelt won 46 of 48 states he beat Alf Landon in Jones County by just twelve votes.

Presidential election results
Presidential elections results[18]
Year Republican Democratic Third parties
2016 80.7% 450 12.4% 69 7.0% 39
2012 80.5% 490 17.7% 108 1.8% 11
2008 73.8% 463 23.4% 147 2.7% 17
2004 78.8% 565 18.7% 134 2.5% 18
2000 76.7% 509 20.6% 137 2.7% 18
1996 63.5% 463 25.2% 184 11.3% 82
1992 58.3% 454 21.3% 166 20.4% 159
1988 66.3% 521 33.2% 261 0.5% 4
1984 76.6% 689 22.9% 206 0.4% 4
1980 75.0% 689 20.6% 189 4.5% 41
1976 57.9% 515 42.0% 374 0.1% 1
1972 64.4% 642 34.7% 346 0.9% 9
1968 55.8% 562 35.5% 358 8.7% 88
1964 43.1% 415 56.9% 548
1960 60.4% 644 39.6% 423
1956 56.1% 601 43.9% 471
1952 69.6% 739 30.4% 323
1948 55.1% 522 43.7% 414 1.3% 12
1944 63.8% 465 36.2% 264
1940 62.1% 832 37.9% 508
1936 48.1% 608 49.1% 620 2.9% 36
1932 32.4% 472 63.9% 929 3.7% 54
1928 66.4% 857 32.7% 422 0.9% 11
1924 55.5% 732 10.7% 141 33.9% 447
1920 62.3% 609 26.1% 255 11.6% 113

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "State & County QuickFacts". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on June 7, 2011. Retrieved November 25, 2013. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  2. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved June 7, 2011. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  3. ^ "Dakota Territory, South Dakota, and North Dakota: Individual County Chronologies". Dakota Territory Atlas of Historical County Boundaries. The Newberry Library. 2006. Retrieved March 30, 2015.
  4. ^ a b Jones County SD Google Maps (accessed 4 February 2019)
  5. ^ "Find an Altitude" Google Maps (accessed 4 February 2019)
  6. ^ "2010 Census Gazetteer Files". US Census Bureau. August 22, 2012. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  7. ^ Map of Time Zone Line through South Dakota (accessed January 30, 2019)
  8. ^ "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved May 14, 2019.
  9. ^ "US Decennial Census". US Census Bureau. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved March 26, 2015. Cite uses deprecated parameter |deadurl= (help)
  10. ^ "Historical Census Browser". University of Virginia Library. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  11. ^ Forstall, Richard L., ed. (March 27, 1995). "Population of Counties by Decennial Census: 1900 to 1990". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  12. ^ "Census 2000 PHC-T-4. Ranking Tables for Counties: 1990 and 2000" (PDF). US Census Bureau. April 2, 2001. Retrieved March 26, 2015.
  13. ^ "American FactFinder". US Census Bureau. Retrieved May 14, 2011.
  14. ^ a b c "Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  15. ^ "Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  16. ^ "Selected Social Characteristics in the US – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  17. ^ "Selected Economic Characteristics – 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates". US Census Bureau. Retrieved March 12, 2016.
  18. ^ Leip, David. "Atlas of US Presidential Elections". uselectionatlas.org. Retrieved April 15, 2018.

Coordinates: 43°57′N 100°41′W / 43.95°N 100.69°W / 43.95; -100.69