Joinville Studios

The Joinville Studios were a film studio in Paris which operated between 1910 and 1987. They were one of the leading French studios, with major companies such as Pathé and Gaumont making films there.

A second studio was added to the original in 1923.[1] This was located less than a kilometre away, and together the two served as a major filmmaking hub.[2]

In the early 1930s the American company Paramount Pictures took over the studios and made French-language versions of their hit films. In total films were made in fourteen different languages as Joinville became a hub of such multi-language versions.[3] While many were remakes of English-language hits, some were original stories. This practice declined as dubbing became more commonplace.[4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Crisp p.95
  2. ^ Crisp p.119
  3. ^ Bentley p.52
  4. ^ Williams p.175-77

BibliographyEdit

  • Bentley, Bernard. A Companion to Spanish Cinema. Boydell & Brewer 2008.
  • Crisp, C.G. The Classic French Cinema, 1930-1960. Indiana University Press, 1993
  • Williams, Alan Larson. Republic of Images: A History of French Filmmaking. Harvard University Press, 1992.