John Sheehan (actor)

John Sheehan (October 22, 1885 – February 14, 1952) was an American actor and vaudeville performer. After acting onstage and in vaudeville for several years,[1] Sheehan began making films in 1914, starring in a number of short films. From 1914-16, he appeared in over 60 films, the vast majority of them film shorts.[2]

John Sheehan
John Sheehan.jpg
Promotional shot of Sheehan in the 1939 film, Slightly Honorable
Born(1885-10-22)October 22, 1885
DiedFebruary 14, 1952(1952-02-14) (aged 66)
OccupationActor
Years active1914–52

He returned exclusively to the stage in 1917, where he remained until the advent of sound films.[1] He returned to the screen with a featured role in the 1930 melodrama, Swing High, starring Helen Twelvetrees.[3]

His more notable performances and roles include: the first talking version of the film Kismet (1930), starring Otis Skinner and Loretta Young;[4] a featured role in 1934's Little Miss Marker, starring Shirley Temple and Adolphe Menjou;[5] Michael Curtiz's Kid Galahad (1937), starring Edward G. Robinson, Bette Davis, and Humphrey Bogart;[6] the Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn romantic comedy Woman of the Year (1942);[7] the classic biopic The Pride of the Yankees (1943), starring Gary Cooper and Teresa Wright;[8] another 1943 biographical film, Yankee Doodle Dandy, starring James Cagney;[9] the Abbott and Costello comedy Buck Privates Come Home (1947);[10] and the last film to be released in which he appeared was 1952's Somebody Loves Me, starring Betty Hutton and Ralph Meeker, which was released several months after Sheehan's death.[11]

While Somebody Loves Me was his last film to be released, the last film which Sheehan worked on was the 1952 Tracy and Hepburn romantic comedy Pat and Mike. Production on Pat and Mike was in early 1952, and it was released in June of that year, four months after Sheehan died.[12]

Personal life and deathEdit

Sheehan was married to Blanche Morris Roberts. He died on February 15, 1952 in Woodland Hills, California, and was buried in Holy Cross Cemetery, in Culver City.[13]

FilmographyEdit

(Per AFI database)[14][15]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Erickson, Hal. "John Sheehan, Biography". AllMovie. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  2. ^ "John Sheehan (I)". Internet Movie Database. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  3. ^ "Swing High: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  4. ^ "Kismet: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  5. ^ "Little Miss Marker: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  6. ^ "Kid Galahad: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  7. ^ "Woman of the Year: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  8. ^ "The Pride of the Yankees: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  9. ^ "Yankee Doodle Dandy: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  10. ^ "Buck Privates Come Home: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  11. ^ "Somebody Loves Me: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  12. ^ "Pat and Mike: Detail View". American Film Institute. Retrieved July 15, 2015.
  13. ^ "John Joseph "Jack" Sheehan profile". Find a Grave. Retrieved July 16, 2015.
  14. ^ "John J. Sheehan profile". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 24, 2018.
  15. ^ "John J. Sheehan profile". American Film Institute. Retrieved January 24, 2018.

External linksEdit