John Schmidt (pool player)

John Schmidt (born April 12, 1973) also known as "Mister 600" is an American pool player, born in Keokuk, Iowa.[2] Schmidt won the 2012 World Straight Pool Championship winning the final 200–169 against Efren Reyes.[3] Schmidt also won the 2006 US Open 9-Ball Championship in Norfolk, Virginia. He was also part of the US team in two Mosconi Cup teams at the 2006, and 2014 Mosconi Cups.[4] Schmidt holds the record for the highest run in straight pool, with a run of 626 in 2019.

John Schmidt
Picture of John Scmidt
John Schmidt at the 2004 US Open 9-Ball Championship, Chesapeake Conference Center in Chesapeake, Virginia
Born (1973-04-12) April 12, 1973 (age 46)[1]
Keokuk, Iowa, US
Sport country United States
NicknameMr. 600
Professional1999
Pool gamesStraight Pool, 9-ball
Tournament wins
MajorUS 9-Ball Champion (2006)
World ChampionStraight Pool (2012)
Ranking info

CareerEdit

Schmidt won the 2006 US Open 9-Ball Championship Championship, with a 11-6 victory in the final over Rodolfo Luat.[1][5] Schmidt would later become world champion in 2012 at the World Tournament straight pool championship winning 200–169 against Efren Reyes in the final.[3]

On May 27, 2019 at Easy Street Billiards in Monterey, California, Schmidt defeated the longstanding 14.1 pool record run set by Willie Mosconi in 1954 of 526 with a video-recorded run of 626 that was never released.[6] Schmidt had made a personal best run of 403 balls in 2007, but in 2018, he began a concerted, dedicated effort to defeat Mosconi's record, shooting six to eight hours a day, filming the sessions for verification. Beginning May 8, 2019, the record was his fourth attempt.[6]

Mike Panozzo, publisher of Billiards Digest, praised Schmidt's "focus and the perseverance to run 380, and then you miss and start over again."[7] Mosconi's record 526 happened under circumstances somewhat different from those that Schmidt faced. Mosconi, then 40, was competing in an exhibition match with a man named Earl Bruney in Springfield, Ohio.[8] Having defeating Bruney, he just kept shooting until he reached 526. Schmidt was purely going for the record, with no opponent, starting anew each time he fell short.[7] Mosconi also played on a smaller table, 4 feet by 8 feet. Schmidt's run came on a larger 4½-by-9-foot modern professional table.[6][9]

Filmed at the Derby City Classic, Schmidt ran 112 in straight pool on video by Accu-Stats, sharing many insights on the DVD version.[10][11] Filmed at TAR Studio on July 13–15, 2012, Schmidt competed in an all-around challenge match against Corey Deuel in the disciplines of eight-ball, one-pocket, and ten-ball.[12]

Titles and achievementsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b "John Schmidt Wins US Open". azbilliards.com. Archived from the original on March 18, 2016. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  2. ^ "John "Mr. 400" Schmidt Team Captain" Retrieved May 29, 2019
  3. ^ a b "Schmidt Tops 14.1 Field". azbilliards.com. Archived from the original on August 21, 2018. Retrieved August 21, 2018.
  4. ^ "USA Mosconi Cup 2014 Team members named". azbilliards.com. Archived from the original on August 21, 2018. Retrieved August 21, 2018.
  5. ^ "US Open 9-Ball Championship 2006". azbilliards.com. Archived from the original on September 12, 2017. Retrieved May 29, 2019. Rodolfo
  6. ^ a b c "After Much Effort, an 'Unbreakable' Record in Straight Pool Is Topped". nytimes.com. May 28, 2019. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  7. ^ a b "Pool pro chases record set in Springfield 65 years ago". springfieldnewssun. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  8. ^ "Billiard Buzz - Mr. 600". azbilliards.com. Vol. 4 no. June 2019. Retrieved June 14, 2019.
  9. ^ "Surpassing a billards' milestone". Monterey Herald. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  10. ^ 'John Schmidt on Straight Pool' Retrieved May 29, 2019
  11. ^ "Accu-Stats Make It Happen Event Continues at Sandcastle Billiards". azbilliards.com. Archived from the original on March 26, 2015. Retrieved May 29, 2019.
  12. ^ 'TAR 28' Retrieved May 29, 2019
  13. ^ "Schmidt Tops 14.1 Field". azbilliards.com. Archived from the original on August 21, 2018. Retrieved May 29, 2019.

External linksEdit