John P. McCarthy

John P. McCarthy (March 17, 1884 – September 4, 1962), also known as J.P. McCarthy or simply as John McCarthy, was an American director and screenwriter of the 1920s through 1945. He began in the film industry in front of the camera, as an actor in silent films and film shorts during the 1910s, before moving behind the camera in 1920. He usually directed his own screenplays. Although he directed the occasional drama or comedy, his specialty was the Western, which make up 28 of his 38 filmography entries.[1]

John P. McCarthy
John P. McCarthy.jpg
Born(1884-03-17)March 17, 1884
San Francisco, California, United States
DiedSeptember 4, 1962(1962-09-04) (aged 78)
Pasadena, California, United States
OccupationDirector, screenwriter
Years active1920–45
FamilyMary Eunice McCarthy (sister)
Francis Joseph McCarty
Henry McCarty (brothers)

Life and careerEdit

John P. McCarthy was born on Saint Patrick's Day 1884 in San Francisco, California to John Henry and Catherine Lynch McCarty. He later changed his last name from "McCarty" to "McCarthy".

He developed an early radiotelephone system, but was unsuccessful in marketing his invention.[2][3] McCarthy entered the film industry in 1914. His first part was a small role in the film short The Wireless Voice, which also featured his radio equipment.[4] Over the next four years he appeared in eight films, all but one a short. His one feature was in a small part of a prison guard in the 1916 D. W. Griffith classic, Intolerance.[5]

McCarthy moved behind the camera in 1920, writing, producing and directing Out of the Dust, starring Russell Simpson.[6] He wrote eighteen scripts during his 25-year career, all but four of which he directed himself.[7] McCarthy directed a total of 38 films, 12 of which were silent. His notable silent films include The Lovelorn (1927),[8] and Diamond Handcuffs (1928).[9] Some of his notable sound films include: Oklahoma Cyclone (1930), one of the first "singing cowboy films;[10] The Law of 45's, the forerunner to the Republic Pictures western series The Three Mesquiteers;[11] and 1936's Song of the Gringo, the film debut of Tex Ritter.[12]

His most prolific year was 1931, when he directed eight films, two of which he also wrote: Cavalier of the West and God's Country and the Man.[7] He took a hiatus from the film industry in the early 1940s, before returning in 1944.[13] His final directorial credit was part of The Cisco Kid series, 1945's The Cisco Kid Returns.[14] In 1946 McCarthy wrote the story for the Western, Under Arizona Skies, directed by Lambert Hillyer, which was his final film credit.[15]

FilmographyEdit

(Per AFI database)[7]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "John P. McCarthy". Complete Index to World Film. Archived from the original on June 13, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  2. ^ "With Wireless Twists Tail of Powers That Be", San Francisco Call, March 11, 1910, pages 1–2.
  3. ^ "Young Inventor's Dream Realized", Oakland Tribune, June 5, 1914, page 7.
  4. ^ "Wireless Telephone in the Movies", Popular Electricity and Modern Mechanics, November 1914, page 510.
  5. ^ "Intolerance: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 17, 2015. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  6. ^ "Out of the Dust: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 29, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  7. ^ a b c "John P. McCarthy". American Film Institute. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  8. ^ "The Lovelorn: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on December 17, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  9. ^ "Diamond Handcuffs: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on December 17, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  10. ^ "Oklahoma Cyclone: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  11. ^ "The Law of 45's: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  12. ^ "Song of the Gringo: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  13. ^ Erickson, Hal. "J.P. McCarthy". AllMovie. Archived from the original on November 4, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  14. ^ "The Cisco Kid Returns: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 3, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.
  15. ^ "Under Arizona Skies: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved June 13, 2015.

External linksEdit