John McKeon

John McKeon (March 29, 1808, Albany, New York – November 22, 1883, New York City) was an American lawyer and politician from New York.

John McKeon
John McKeon (New York).jpg
United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York
In office
July 1854 – January 1858
PresidentFranklin Pierce
Preceded byCharles O'Conor
Succeeded byTheodore Sedgwick
District Attorney of New York County
In office
January 1, 1882 – November 22, 1883
Preceded byDaniel G. Rollins
Succeeded byJohn Vincent (Acting)
In office
February 6, 1846 – December 31, 1850
Preceded byMatthew C. Paterson
Succeeded byN. Bowditch Blunt
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 3rd district
In office
March 4, 1841 – March 3, 1843
Preceded byOgden Hoffman
Succeeded byJonas P. Phoenix
In office
March 4, 1835 – March 3, 1837
Preceded byCharles G. Ferris
Succeeded byOgden Hoffman
Member of the
New York State Assembly
from New York County
In office
1832–1834
Personal details
Born(1808-03-29)March 29, 1808
Albany, New York, U.S.
DiedNovember 22, 1883(1883-11-22) (aged 75)
New York City, New York, U.S.
Political partyDemocratic
Other political
affiliations
Jacksonian
Alma materColumbia College

LifeEdit

He was the son of Capt. James McKeon who fought in the War of 1812. He graduated from the law department of Columbia College in 1828, was admitted to the bar, and commenced practice in New York City.

McKeon was a representative in the New York State Assembly from 1832 to 1834.[1] He was elected as a Jacksonian to the 24th United States Congress, serving from March 4, 1835, to March 3, 1837, but was defeated for re-election. He was elected as a Democrat to the 27th United States Congress, serving from March 4, 1841, to March 3, 1843, but was again defeated for re-election.[2]

In February 1846, he was appointed New York County District Attorney and, when the office became elective under the State Constitution of 1846, was elected in May 1847 to succeed himself. He remained in office until the end of 1850 when his term expired. In this office, he secured the conviction of Madame Restell.

He was appointed by President Franklin Pierce United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York, and served from July 10, 1854, to January 7, 1858. While holding this office, he prosecuted a number of important cases. Among them were the attempt to enlist men to serve in the British Army during the Crimean War, and the seizure of the filibustering ship "Northern Light."

He was again New York County D.A. from 1882 until his death in office. He died at his residence at 44, West 37th Street, and was buried in a family vault under the old St. Patrick's Cathedral on Mott Street in New York City.

NotesEdit

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

  • United States Congress. "John McKeon (id: M000509)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.
  • The New York Civil List compiled by Franklin Benjamin Hough (pages 211ff and 377; Weed, Parsons and Co., 1858)
  • SKETCH OF THE CANDIDATES in NYT on October 19, 1881
  • JOHN M'KEON'S WORK DONE in NYT on November 23, 1883

Attribution

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Charles G. Ferris
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 3rd congressional district

1835–1837
Succeeded by
Ogden Hoffman
Preceded by
Ogden Hoffman
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from New York's 3rd congressional district

1841–1843
Succeeded by
Jonas P. Phoenix
Legal offices
Preceded by
Matthew C. Paterson
District Attorney of New York County
1846–1850
Succeeded by
N. Bowditch Blunt
Preceded by
Charles O'Conor
United States Attorney for the Southern District of New York
1854–1858
Succeeded by
Theodore Sedgwick
Preceded by
Daniel G. Rollins
District Attorney of New York County
1882–1883
Succeeded by
John Vincent
Acting