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John Darlington Newcomer

John Darlington Newcomer (born August 23, 1867, Shippensburg, Pennsylvania— died June 12, 1931, Charleston, South Carolina) was an American architect whose practice focused on Charleston, South Carolina in the early 20th century.[1]

John Darlington Newcomer
John Darlington Newcomer photo.jpg
John Newcomer was known as the "dean of Charleston architects" for his extensive practice during the early 20th century
Born(1867-08-23)August 23, 1867
Shippensburg, Pennsylvania
DiedDecember 30, 1931(1931-12-30) (aged 64)
Charleston, South Carolina
NationalityAmerican
OccupationArchitect
Known forCharleston architecture

LifeEdit

Newcomer was born on August 23, 1867, in Shippensburg, Pennsylvania, to Abram Newcomer, of Swiss-English ancestry, and Sarah Darlington, of English ancestry. He was educated at an architecture school in Kansas and also at Cornell University. After about fifteen years as an architect for the federal government, Newcomer settled in Charleston, South Carolina in about 1906. He married Marie Anna Hacker.[1]

At the time of his death on December 30, 1931, in Charleston, South Carolina, he was called the "dean of Charleston architects."[2] He is buried at Magnolia Cemetery, Charleston, South Carolina.[1]

Notable projects of his include the following:[1][2]

  • C.D. Franke warehouses and offices (1908) (177 Church St.)[3]
  • 332 King St. (1909) (expansion and remodel)[4]
  • 334 King St. (1909) (expansion and remodel)[4]
  • 166 1/2 Wentworth St. (1909)[5]
  • 198 Calhoun St. (1909) (no longer extant)[5]
  • 156 Wentworth St. (1910) (alterations and addition)[6]
  • R.A. Kinloch Home for Nurses (1910) (Calhoun St.)[7]
  • G.G. Creighton Residence, 52 Rutledge Avenue (1912) [8]
  • Bethel Methodist Episcopal Sunday school (1912) (55 Pitt St.)[9]
  • Baker Sanatorium (1912) (55 Ashley Ave.)[10]
  • Liberty & Citizens' Bank (1914) (253 King St.)[11]
  • 209 Meeting St., Charleston (1914)[12]
  • 213 Meeting St., Charleston (1914)[12]
  • Memorial Baptist Church (1915) (981 King St.)[13]
  • The St. Margaret's Home (10 St. Margaret St.)
  • Sottile-Cadillac Co. garage (255-263 Meeting St.) (1919)[14]
  • St. Peter's Protestant Episcopal Church and rectory (570 Rutledge Ave.)[15]
  • J.M. Connelley Memorial Chapel (313 Meeting St.)
  • South Atlantic Mortgage Co. building, 71 Broad St. (1929)[16]
  • Dr. J. Sumter Rhame house (1931) (65 South Battery)[17]
  • St. Paul's school, Meggett, South Carolina
  • Atlantic National Bank (515 King St.)
  • Evening Post building (134 Meeting St.) (destroyed in fire in 1979)
  • 807 Rutledge Ave., Charleston[18]
  • Warren Halsey Dunning house (419 W. Carolina Ave. Summerville, SC)

GalleryEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "John D. Newcomer Found Dead at 64". Charleston News & Courier. December 31, 1931. p. 1. Retrieved September 2, 2012.
  2. ^ a b W.H.J. Thomas (May 24, 1971). "John Newcomer: Dean of Architects". Charleston News & Courier. p. 1–B. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  3. ^ "To Build Big Warehouse". Charleston News & Courier. April 7, 1908. p. 12. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  4. ^ a b "To Build Bachelor Apartments". Charleston (S.C.) News & Courier. April 3, 1909. p. 10. Retrieved April 9, 2013.
  5. ^ a b "Over $150,000 in Buildings". Charleston News & Courier. July 7, 1909. p. 10. Retrieved April 14, 2013.
  6. ^ Thomas, W.J.H. (April 20, 1970). "156 Wentworth St. Combines Grandeur And Conservatism". Charleston News & Courier. pp. 1B. Retrieved January 15, 2014.
  7. ^ "To Be Completed by July 15". Charleston (S.C.) News & Courier. July 2, 1910. p. 5. Retrieved April 5, 2013.
  8. ^ John E. Wells and Robert E. Dalton, The South Carolina Architects, 1885-1935, A Biographical Directory (Richmond, 1992), p. 130
  9. ^ "Bethel Sunday-School to Have Fine New Building". Charleston News & Courier. August 15, 1912. p. 7. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  10. ^ "Baker-Craig Sanatorium Opens". Charleston News & Courier. November 29, 1912. p. 10. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  11. ^ "Citizens' Bank to Build". Charleston News & Courier. March 27, 1914. p. 6. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  12. ^ a b "Three-Story Buildings". Charleston (S.C.) News & Courier. June 5, 1914. p. 12. Retrieved April 8, 2013.
  13. ^ "Baptist Memorial Church Building". Charleston (S.C.) News & Courier. March 12, 1915. p. 8. Retrieved April 8, 2013.
  14. ^ "New Garage to Be Built". Evening Post. Charleston, South Carolina. February 26, 1919. p. 9.
  15. ^ "Do You Know Your Charleston?". Charleston News & Courier. May 4, 1931. p. 10. Retrieved September 7, 2012.
  16. ^ "New Building on Broad St". Evening Post. Charleston, South Carolina. May 3, 1929. pp. 4A.
  17. ^ "Do You Know Your Charleston?". Charleston News & Courier. Dec 14, 1931. p. 10. Retrieved September 17, 2013.
  18. ^ "Remember This Architect?". Charleston (S.C.) News & Courier. Sep 4, 1949. p. 9. Retrieved April 10, 2013.