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John Anderson (ice hockey)

John Murray Anderson (born March 28, 1957) is a Canadian retired ice hockey right winger. He most recently served as an assistant coach for the Minnesota Wild. He was re-hired as the head coach of the Chicago Wolves of the AHL on July 10, 2013 after coaching them from 1997 to 2008. He is a former head coach of the Atlanta Thrashers and assistant coach of the Phoenix Coyotes of the National Hockey League. He played 12 seasons in the NHL for the Toronto Maple Leafs, Quebec Nordiques and Hartford Whalers.

John Anderson
John Anderson AHL All-Star Classic 2015.jpg
Born (1957-03-28) March 28, 1957 (age 62)
Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Height 5 ft 11 in (180 cm)
Weight 200 lb (91 kg; 14 st 4 lb)
Position Right wing
Shot Left
Played for Toronto Maple Leafs
Quebec Nordiques
Hartford Whalers
NHL Draft 11th overall, 1977
Toronto Maple Leafs
WHA Draft 14th overall, 1977
Quebec Nordiques
Playing career 1977–1994

Playing careerEdit

As a youth, Anderson played in the 1969 Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournament with a minor ice hockey team from Wexford, Toronto.[1]

Anderson was drafted in the first round, 11th overall by the Toronto Maple Leafs in the 1977 NHL Entry Draft. He played 814 career NHL games, scoring 282 goals and 349 assists for 631 points from 1977–78 until 1988–89. Anderson was beginning to establish himself as a regular NHLer during his third season in Toronto when the club made a four-player trade with the Vancouver Canucks that brought winger Rick Vaive and centre Bill Derlago to Toronto. Anderson was paired with the two new acquisitions to form a high scoring line for the Maple Leafs. His best statistical season was the 1982–83 season, when he set career highs with 49 assists and 80 points. Following the 1984-85 season, the fourth year in a row that Anderson had scored 30-or-more goals for the Maple Leafs, he was traded to the Quebec Nordiques for defensemen Brad Maxwell.

Anderson continued to be a valued goal scorer with Quebec and had potted 21-goals when he was traded again, this time to the Hartford Whalers. Anderson caught fire in Hartford to end the 1985-86 campaign putting up 25-points in just 14-games following the trade to finish the year with 29 goals and 74 points then added 13 more points in ten playoff games. The following year, his first full year with Hartford, Whalers sniper Sylvain Turgeon battled injuries and Anderson filled in nicely as the top left wing on the team. He hit the 30-goal plateau for the fifth and final time of his career finishing with 31 goals and 75 points, good for the third highest point total on the team. He played two more years in Hartford with diminishing returns then played the last five seasons of his career in the minor leagues, primarily the International Hockey League where he was a solid goal scorer.

Anderson scored the winning goal against the New York Rangers on April 4, 1987, to give the Hartford Whalers their only division championship. Anderson was the captain of his junior team, the Toronto Marlboros.

Post-playing careerEdit

 
Chicago Wolves banner honoring Anderson's coaching history with the franchise

In 1996–97, Anderson coached the Quad City Mallards to their first of six consecutive 50-win seasons and their first Colonial Hockey League championship in just the franchise's second season. John Anderson is the Chicago Wolves franchise's all-time coaching leader in wins with 371 and holds the club mark for postseason victories as well with 80. John led the Wolves in winning the Turner Cup and Calder Cup four times in his eleven seasons at the team's helm. His team was crowned league champions in 1997–98, 1999–00, 2001–02 and 2007–08.

Anderson also helped establish "John Anderson's", a diner best known for its "Banquet Burger", as well as its $4 breakfast special. The original restaurant is located at Victoria Park Ave. and Van Horne Ave. in Toronto, Ontario.[2] There is another location at the corner of Dundas and Erindale Station Road in Mississauga, Ontario. The key items offered at the Mississauga location are the "Big Puck Burger" and "John's New Specialty", which is souvlaki on a sesame-seed bun. The newest location is in Markham at 3780 14th Ave. just east of Warden Ave. This location is owned by the former owners of the original location at V.P and Van Horn. They owned that store for 25 years and opened the Markham location in the beginning of 2013.

Anderson coached the American gold medal winning team in the 2007 Jewish World Cup hockey tournament in Israel.[3]

On June 20, 2008, Anderson was named as the fourth head coach of the Atlanta Thrashers.[4] On October 10, 2008, Anderson won his first game as an NHL coach 7–4 against his good friend Bruce Boudreau's Washington Capitals.

On April 14, 2010, Anderson was released as head coach of the Atlanta Thrashers after 2 seasons with the organization.[5]

On July 12, 2011, Anderson became an assistant coach for the Phoenix Coyotes.[6]

On July 10, 2013, Anderson was rehired as the head coach of the Chicago Wolves. After leaving the organization in 2016, he joined the Minnesota Wild as an assistant head coach.[7]

Career statisticsEdit

Regular season and playoffsEdit

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1972–73 Markham Waxers MetJHL
1973–74 Markham Waxers OPJHL
1973–74 Toronto Marlboros OHA-Jr. 38 22 22 44 6
1974–75 Toronto Marlboros OMJHL 70 49 64 113 31 22 16 14 30 14
1974–75 Toronto Marlboros MC 4 4 6 10 2
1975–76 Toronto Marlboros OMJHL 39 26 25 51 19 10 7 4 11 7
1976–77 Toronto Marlboros OMJHL 64 57 62 119 42 6 3 5 8 0
1977–78 Dallas Black Hawks CHL 52 22 23 45 6 13 11 8 19 2
1977–78 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 17 1 2 3 2 2 0 0 0 0
1978–79 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 71 15 11 26 10 6 0 2 2 0
1979–80 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 74 25 28 53 22 3 1 1 2 0
1980–81 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 75 17 26 43 31 2 0 0 0 0
1981–82 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 69 31 26 57 30
1982–83 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 80 31 49 80 24 4 2 4 6 0
1983–84 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 73 37 31 68 22
1984–85 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 75 32 31 63 27
1985–86 Québec Nordiques NHL 65 21 28 49 26
1985–86 Hartford Whalers NHL 14 8 17 25 2 10 5 8 13 0
1986–87 Hartford Whalers NHL 76 31 44 75 19 6 1 2 3 0
1987–88 Hartford Whalers NHL 63 17 32 49 20
1988–89 Hartford Whalers NHL 62 16 24 40 28 4 0 1 1 2
1989–90 Binghamton Whalers AHL 3 1 1 2 0
1989–90 HC Milan ITA 9 7 9 16 18
1989–90 EHC Chur CHE.2 3 2 0 2 0
1990–91 Fort Wayne Komets IHL 63 40 43 83 24 1 3 0 3 0
1991–92 New Haven Nighthawks AHL 68 41 54 95 24 4 0 4 4 0
1992–93 San Diego Gulls IHL 65 34 46 80 18 11 5 6 11 4
1993–94 San Diego Gulls IHL 72 24 24 48 32 4 1 1 2 8
NHL totals 814 282 349 631 263 37 9 18 27 2
IHL totals 200 98 113 211 74 16 9 7 16 12

InternationalEdit

Year Team Event   GP G A Pts PIM
1977 Canada WJC 7 10 5 15 6
1983 Canada WC 6 2 2 4 6
1985 Canada WC 9 5 2 7 18
Senior totals 15 7 4 11 24

NHL coaching statisticsEdit

Team Year Regular season Post season
G W L OTL Pts Division rank Result
ATL 2008–09 82 35 41 6 76 4th in Southeast Missed playoffs
ATL 2009–10 82 35 34 13 83 2nd in Southeast Missed playoffs
Total 164 70 75 19

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Pee-Wee players who have reached NHL or WHA" (PDF). Quebec International Pee-Wee Hockey Tournament. 2018. Retrieved January 9, 2019.
  2. ^ Duhatschek, Eric (May 31, 2005). "Anderson's name lives on, with a little sizzle". The Globe and Mail. Retrieved August 11, 2018.
  3. ^ Lungen, Paul (November 13, 2008). "BENCH BOSSES NAMED FOR WORLD JEWISH TOURNAMENT". Canadian Jewish News. Retrieved August 11, 2018. The Americans, who promise to be strong again in 2009, were led by former NHLer John Anderson to their gold-medal win in 2007
  4. ^ "ATLANTA THRASHERS HIRE JOHN ANDERSON AS NEW HEAD COACH". thehockeynews.com. June 20, 2008. Retrieved August 11, 2018.
  5. ^ "Thrashers fire John Anderson". The Globe and Mail. April 14, 2010. Retrieved August 11, 2018.
  6. ^ "Coyotes add Anderson as assistant coach". sportsnet.ca. July 12, 2011. Retrieved August 11, 2018.
  7. ^ "Wild Hire John Anderson To Fill Out Boudreau's Staff". minnesota.cbslocal.com. June 8, 2016. Retrieved August 11, 2018.

External linksEdit