Jim Hoagland

Jimmie Lee Hoagland (born January 22, 1940) is a Pulitzer prize-winning American journalist.[1] He is a contributing editor to The Washington Post, since 2010, previously serving as an associate editor, senior foreign correspondent, and columnist.[2]

Jim Hoagland
Born (1940-01-22) January 22, 1940 (age 80)
EducationB.A., University of South Carolina; Columbia University
OccupationJournalist
EmployerThe Washington Post
TitleContributing editor
Spouse(s)Jane Stanton Hitchcock
ChildrenTwo children
AwardsTwo-time winner of the Pulitzer prize

Hoagland is a graduate of the University of South Carolina and attended graduate school at the University of Aix-en-Provence in France and Columbia University.[3]

He has worked in journalism for over six-decades, beginning as a part-time reporter while a student. Hoagland has served as a foreign correspondent from Africa, France and Lebanon with the Post, and has been awarded two Pulitzer prizes, in 1971 and 1991. He authored one book, based on his coverage in South Africa.[4]

Hoagland is married to novelist, Jane Stanton Hitchcock, and has two children.[1][3]

Background and educationEdit

Jimmie Lee Hoagland, was born in Rock Hill, South Carolina, to parents Lee Roy Hoagland Jr., and Edith Irene Sullivan.[1]

He graduated from the University of South Carolina, in 1961, with his bachelor's in journalism. He attended post graduate programs at both the University of Aix-en-Provence (1961–62) in France and as a Ford Foundation fellow (1968–69) at Columbia University in New York.[1][3]

He was an Annenberg Distinguished Visiting Fellow at Stanford University's Hoover Institution, (2010–13).[3]

Hoagland served in the U.S. Air Force, stationed in Germany, from 1962 to 1964.[1]

CareerEdit

Hoagland began working in journalism in 1958, as a part-time reporter for the Rock Hill Evening News while a student.[1]

He worked as a copy editor for The New York Times, from 1964 to 1966, before joining the Washington Post. At the Post, he served as a foreign correspondent, first in Nairobi as a correspondent in Africa, (1969–72) and later in Beirut (1972–75).

In 1976, Hoagland moved to Paris, France where he covered France, Italy and Spain, in his internationally syndicated column, until returning to the United States in 1978.[1][5]

He is currently (2020) a contributing editor to The Washington Post, since 2010, previously serving as an associate editor, senior foreign correspondent, and columnist for twenty years.[2]

1971 Pulitzer prizeEdit

Writing for The Washington Post, Hoagland won the Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting in 1971 "for his coverage of the struggle against apartheid in the Republic of South Africa."[6] Hoagland was banned from Africa for five years for his reporting on South Africa and apartheid.[4] He wrote a book, South Africa: Civilizations in Conflict, published in 1972.[7]

1991 Pulitzer prizeEdit

Hoagland continued writing for The Washington Post, in Washington D.C., as a foreign editor and assistant managing editor for foreign news.[5] In 1991 he won the Pulitzer Prize for Commentary "for searching and prescient columns on events leading up to the Gulf War and on the political problems of Mikhail Gorbachev."[8]

Hoagland wrote the series of columns during the breakup of the Soviet Union; the winning series of stories are listed below.

  • Gorbachev Feels The Heat, January 16, 1990[8]
  • Iraq: Outlaw State, March 29, 1990[9]
  • Soft on Saddam, April 10, 1990[10]
  • Gorbachev's Choices...And a Soviet Food Crisis, April 23, 1990[11]
  • Turning a Blind Eye to Baghdad, July 5, 1990[12]
  • A Real Arab Awakening, August 16, 1990[13]
  • ...And the Tale of a Transcript, September 17, 1990[14]
  • A Quick Rewrite of History, October 7, 1990[8]
  • Gorbachev's Nobel Lifeline, October 16, 1990[15]
  • As Good a Snake-Oil Merchant as There Is, November 13, 1990[16]

AwardsEdit

  • 1971 Pulitzer Prize for International Reporting, "for his coverage of the struggle against apartheid in the Republic of South Africa."[6]
  • 1977 Overseas Press Club Award for Best Interpretation of Foreign Affairs, Daily Newspaper or Wire Service[17]
  • 1991 Pulitzer Prize for Commentary, "for searching and prescient columns on events leading up to the Gulf War and on the political problems of Mikhail Gorbachev."[8]
  • 1994 Eugene Meyer Career Achievement Award[3]
  • 2002 Cernobbio-Europa Prize by the editors of seven European newspapers for his international reporting[3]
  • 2017 South Carolina Hall of Fame, in recognition as a distinguished writer, by the University of South Carolina[4]

QuotesEdit

Regarding the War on Terror:

  • "The United States is engaged in a shadow war that must now be the central priority for this president and his administration for every day of his term." -- The Washington Post, 2001

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Brennan, Elizabeth A.; Clarage, Elizabeth C. (1999). Who's who of Pulitzer Prize Winners. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 65. ISBN 978-1-57356-111-2.
  2. ^ a b "Jim Hoagland – World Policy Conference". Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "Jim Hoagland". Hoover Institution. Retrieved 21 November 2016.
  4. ^ a b c Columnist, TOM MACK. "ARTS AND HUMANITIES: South Carolina Academy inducts new members". Post and Courier. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  5. ^ a b "Washingtonpost.com: Writers Group". www.washingtonpost.com. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  6. ^ a b "The 1971 Pulitzer Prize Winner in International Reporting". www.pulitzer.org. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  7. ^ Hoagland, Jim (1972). South Africa; Civilizations in Conflict. Houghton Mifflin. ISBN 978-0-395-13546-4.
  8. ^ a b c d "The 1991 Pulitzer Prize Winner in Commentary". www.pulitzer.org. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  9. ^ Hoagl, Jim (1990-03-29). "IRAQ OUTLAW STATE-THE ARAB LEAGUE ENDORSES ITS LATEST JUDICIALLY SANCTIONED MURDER". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  10. ^ Hoagland, Jim. "Soft on Saddam". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 6 November 2020.
  11. ^ Rowl; Evans; Novak, Robert (1990-04-23). "GORBACHEV'S CHOICES. . . AND A SOVIET FOOD CRISIS". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  12. ^ Hoagl, Jim (1990-07-05). "TURNING A BLIND EYE TO BAGHDAD". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  13. ^ Hoagland, Jim. "A Real Arab Awakening". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 6 November 2020.
  14. ^ Hoagland, Jim. "...And the Take of a Transcript". The Pulitzer Prizes. Retrieved 6 November 2020.
  15. ^ Hoagl, Jim (1990-10-16). "GORBACHEV'S NOBEL LIFELINE". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  16. ^ Hoagl, Jim (1990-11-13). "AS GOOD A SNAKE-OIL MERCHANT AS THERE IS". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2020-11-06.
  17. ^ "Awards Recipients". Press Club of America. Retrieved 6 November 2020.

External linksEdit