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Jill Andrew is a Canadian politician, who was elected to the Legislative Assembly of Ontario in the 2018 provincial election.[1] She represents the electoral district of Toronto—St. Paul's as a member of the Ontario New Democratic Party.

Jill Andrew

Member of the Ontario Provincial Parliament
for Toronto—St. Paul's
Assumed office
June 7, 2018
Preceded byEric Hoskins
Personal details
Political partyNew Democratic
Domestic partnerAisha Fairclough
OccupationSmall Business Owner

Prior to her election to the legislature, Andrew was a public speaker and activist, cofounding the group Body Confidence Canada.[2]

She is part of Ontario's first ever Black Caucus, alongside NDP caucus colleagues Laura Mae Lindo, Faisal Hassan, Rima Berns-McGown and Kevin Yarde.[3]

Personal lifeEdit

She identifies as queer.[4] Andrew and her partner Aisha Fairclough are members of the community consortium that own Glad Day Bookshop, an LGBT bookstore in Toronto's Church and Wellesley gay village.[5]

Electoral recordEdit

Ontario general election, 2018
Party Candidate Votes % ±%
New Democratic Jill Andrew 18,843 35.96 +25.75
Liberal Jess Spindler 17,495 33.39 -26.26
Progressive Conservative Andrew Kirsch 13,780 26.30 +2.41
Green Teresa Pun 1,690 3.23 -1.85
Libertarian Jekiah U. Dunavant 448 0.85 -0.03
Ontario Moderate Party Marina Doshchitsina 143 0.27 +0.27
Eligible voters 83,206
Turnout 52,399 62.98 +3.12
New Democratic gain from Liberal Swing +26.00
Source: Elections Ontario[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Jill Andrew captures Toronto-St. Paul’s for NDP". Toronto Star, June 8, 2018.
  2. ^ "‘It was a trifecta of hate’: Body image activist recalls moment she was accosted by a man over her weight, race". Global News, April 9, 2018.
  3. ^ "NDP establishes first official Black Caucus in Ontario History". Ontario New Democratic Party, April 15, 2019.
  4. ^ "These Seven Torontonians Explain What It Means to be Queer". Torontoist, June 20, 2016.
  5. ^ "Of confidence and curves: a Toronto couple campaigns for body positivity". Curve, April 1, 2017.
  6. ^ "Summary of Valid Votes Cast for each Candidate" (PDF). Elections Ontario. p. 11. Retrieved 20 January 2019.