Open main menu

Wikipedia β

Jigar Moradabadi (Urdu: جِگر مُرادآبادی‎), was the nom de plume of Ali Sikandar (1890–1960), one of the most famous Urdu poets of the 20th century and a celebrated Urdu ghazal writer. He received the Sahitya Akademi Award Award in 1958 for his poetry collection "Atish-e-Gul".

Jigar Moradabadi
جِگر مُرادآبادی
Born Sikander Ali
(1890-04-06)6 April 1890
Banaras
Died 9 September 1960(1960-09-09) (aged 70)
Gonda
Occupation Poet

Contents

Early lifeEdit

Jigar Moradabadi's real name was Ali Sikandar. He was born on 6 April 1890 in Banaras. He received oriental education in Arabic, Persian and Urdu in Moradabad, and started to work as a travelling salesman.[1] His father died when Jigar was child and hence his childhood passed in struggle. His poetry teacher (ustad) in the early days was Rasa Rampuri.[citation needed]

Jigar moved to[when?] Gonda, near Lucknow, where he befriended Asghar Gondvi. Jigar married a sister of Gondvi's wife.[citation needed]

He died on 9 September 1960 in Gonda.[1]

LegacyEdit

A small residential colony in Gonda city called Jigar Ganj is named after him. It is close to his original residence. An intermediate school in the city is also named after him - the Jigar Memorial Inter College. Mazar-e-Jigar Moradabadi is in Topkhana, Gonda.

AcclaimEdit

Jigar Moradabadi belonged to the classical school of ghazal writing and was a mentor to Majrooh Sultanpuri, who became a prominent lyricist in the Indian film industry and penned many popular songs in Urdu.

He is now regarded as one of the all-time great Urdu poets.[according to whom?] Jigar was only the second poet in the history of Aligarh Muslim University to be awarded an honorary D.Litt, the first was Muhammad Iqbal.

Faiz Ahmad Faiz, the distinguished Urdu poet and academic, regarded Jigar Moradabadi as a master craftsman in his field.[2]

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Amaresh Datta (1988). Encyclopaedia of Indian Literature. New Delhi: Sahitya Akademi. p. 1838. ISBN 978-81-260-1194-0. Retrieved 10 December 2017. 
  2. ^ "An afternoon with Faiz". The Hindu. 2011-03-06. Retrieved 2017-12-09. 

External linksEdit