Jeffrey Ullman

Jeffrey David "Jeff" Ullman (born November 22, 1942) is an American computer scientist and the Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Engineering, Emeritus, at Stanford University. His textbooks on compilers (various editions are popularly known as the Dragon Book), theory of computation (also known as the Cinderella book), data structures, and databases are regarded as standards in their fields.

Jeffrey D. Ullman
Born (1942-11-22) November 22, 1942 (age 77)
NationalityAmerican
CitizenshipAmerican
Alma materColumbia University
Princeton University
Known fordatabase theory, database systems, formal language theory
AwardsACM Fellow (1994)
Knuth Prize (2000)
IEEE John von Neumann Medal (2010)
Scientific career
InstitutionsStanford University
ThesisSynchronization Error Correcting Codes[1] (1966)
Doctoral advisorArthur Bernstein, Archie McKellar
Doctoral studentsSurajit Chaudhuri
Kevin Karplus
David Maier
Harry Mairson
Alberto O. Mendelzon
Jeffrey F. Naughton
Anand Rajaraman
Yehoshua Sagiv
Mihalis Yannakakis

Early life and careerEdit

Ullman received a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Mathematics from Columbia University in 1963 and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 1966. He then worked for several years at Bell Labs. From 1969 to 1979 he was a professor at Princeton. Since 1979 he has been a professor at Stanford University, where he is currently the Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Computer Science (Emeritus). In 1995 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and in 2000 he was awarded the Knuth Prize. Ullman is also the co-recipient (with John Hopcroft) of the 2010 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, "For laying the foundations for the fields of automata and language theory and many seminal contributions to theoretical computer science."[2]

Ullman's research interests include database theory, data integration, data mining, and education using the information infrastructure. He is one of the founders of the field of database theory, and was the doctoral advisor of an entire generation of students who later became leading database theorists in their own right. He was the Ph.D. advisor of Sergey Brin, one of the co-founders of Google, and served on Google's technical advisory board. He is currently the CEO of Gradiance. He teaches a course on Automata and Mining Massive Datasets on the Stanford Online learning platform.[3][4]

Ullman was elected as a member of the National Academy of Sciences in 2020.[5]

ControversiesEdit

Ullman claims in his personal page at Stanford to be against the Iranian government.[6] The National Iranian American Council has accused him of discriminating against Iranian students and publicized an email, allegedly from Ullman to an Iranian graduate student, in which Ullman said he "will not help Iranian students until Iran recognizes and respects Israel as the land of the Jewish people." [7] After the National Iranian American Council formally complained to Stanford University, a university spokesperson responded that Ullman was expressing his own personal views and not the views of the University, and that "he has no involvement in admission, and Stanford doesn't discriminate in their admission process."[8][9][10][11]

BooksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Jeffrey Ullman at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  2. ^ "IEEE John von Neumann Medal Recipients". IEEE. Retrieved 2010-02-04.
  3. ^ "Stanford - Automata". Stanford Online.
  4. ^ "Stanford - Mining Massive Datasets". Stanford Online.
  5. ^ "16 faculty members, 18 alumni elected to nation's historic academies". The Princetonian. Retrieved 2020-05-11.
  6. ^ "Answers to All Questions Iranian". stanford.edu. Archived from the original on 2012-08-06. Retrieved 2014-07-25.
  7. ^ "NIAC Calls for Stanford to Address Professor's Discriminatory Anti-Iranian Remarks". 2011-01-04. Retrieved 2020-09-14.
  8. ^ Brendan O'Byrne. "Professor comes under fire for alleged anti-Iranian e-mail". Stanford Daily.
  9. ^ "Iranian-American Group Calls on Stanford to Censure Professor". The Chronicle of Higher Education.
  10. ^ "NIAC Calls out Anti-Iranian Stanford Professor". LobeLog. Archived from the original on 2014-07-27. Retrieved 2014-07-25.
  11. ^ "Stanford University President Responds Directly to PAAIA Over Retired Professor's Anti-Iranian Remarks - PAAIA". paaia.org. Archived from the original on 2014-08-09.

External linksEdit