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Jay Jostyn (December 13, 1905 - July 24, 1977)[1] (another source gives his lifespan as December 13, 1901 - June 25, 1976)[2] was an actor in the era of old-time radio. He is best known for portraying the title role in Mr. District Attorney on radio.[1] An article in Radio-TV Mirror in 1952 reported, "He is so generally believed to be a real life lawyer that he frequently receives mail from listeners inviting him to move to certain cities where they feel crimes are going unsolved."[3]

Jay Jostyn
Jay Jostyn 1939.jpg
Jostyn in 1939
Born
Eugene Josten

December 13, 1905
or December 13, 1901
Milwaukee, Wisconsin
DiedJuly 24, 1977
or June 25, 1976
Los Angeles, California
NationalityAmerican
Alma materWisconsin Conservatory of Music
OccupationActor
Known forPortraying the title role in Mr. District Attorney on radio
Spouse(s)Ruth Hill (1928- ?)
ChildrenJean Charles
Jon George
Parent(s)George and Mary Josten

Contents

Early yearsEdit

Jostyn was born Eugene Josten, the son of George and Mary Josten of Milwaukee, Wisconsin. He attended St. Joseph's parochial school, Marquette Academy,[4] Marquette University,[5] and the Wisconsin Conservatory of Music.[4]

Before going into acting full-time, he had a job with a telephone company.[6]

StageEdit

In 1948, Jostyn had the lead in a touring company that performed The Trial of Mary Dugan.[7] On Broadway, he played District Attorney McDonough in Deadfall (1955).[8]

RadioEdit

Jostyn's career in radio began at WLW in Cincinnati, Ohio, when he was the first poetry reader for the station's late-night Moon River program.[9]

Jostyn's roles as a regular cast member included those shown in the table below.

Program Role
Foreign Assignment Brian Barry[10]:258
Hilltop House Frank Klabber[11]
The Life of Mary Sothern Max Tilley[10]:396
Listen Carefully Master of ceremonies[12]
Mr. District Attorney District attorney[10]:464
Our Gal Sunday Jackie [13]
The Parker Family Walter Parker[10]:533
Popeye, The Sailor Captain Dick[14]
Second Husband Ben Porter[15]
This Day Is Ours Curt Curtis[15]:336.

Jostyn was also in the casts of This Small Town,[16] Silver Theater, The Top Guy,[10] and Mystery Man.[17]

TelevisionEdit

Jostyn's roles as a regular cast member included those show in the table below.

Program Role
Mr. District Attorney Paul Garrett[18]
Night Court U.S.A. The judge[19]
The Secret Storm Dr. Hadley[20]

Jostyn also starred in Courtroom U.S.A., a syndicated series that dramatized actual court cases.[21] Additionally, he was also seen in episodes of The Doctor,[18]:163 and The Philco Television Playhouse.[22]

Other professional activitiesEdit

In November 1943, Jostyn was elected to a one-year term as third vice-president of the New York local of the American Federation of Radio Artists.[23] In 1944, he was one of seven people elected to AFRA's national board.[24]

Personal lifeEdit

On October 17, 1928, Jostyn married Ruth Hill in Pasadena, California. She was an actress whom he met when they performed together in a play. They had two sons, Jean Charles and Jon George.[25]

DeathEdit

Jostyn died June 25, 1977, in Los Angeles, California.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b DeLong, Thomas A. (1996). Radio Stars: An Illustrated Biographical Dictionary of 953 Performers, 1920 through 1960. McFarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 978-0-7864-2834-2. P. 144.
  2. ^ a b Aaker, Everett (2006). Encyclopedia of Early Television Crime Fighters. McFarland & Company, Inc. ISBN 978-0-7864-6409-8. P. 296.
  3. ^ "Mr. D. A." Radio-TV Mirror. 37 (3): 60. February 1952. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  4. ^ a b Thompson, Edgar A. (January 1, 1939). "Rose to Fame from Milwaukee Parish Hall". Wisconsin, Milwaukee. The Milwaukee Journal. p. 10. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  5. ^ "Radio Guide". Pennsylvania, Altoona. Altoona Tribune. March 15, 1949. p. 11. Retrieved February 10, 2016 – via Newspapers.com.  
  6. ^ "Mister D. A." Radio Mirror. 28 (2): 62. July 1947. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  7. ^ "Goodman Travels "Dugan"" (PDF). Billboard. September 18, 1948. p. 44. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
  8. ^ "Jay Jostyn". Playbill Vault. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
  9. ^ "Still Flowing". Radio and Television Mirror. 32 (1): 23. June 1949. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  10. ^ a b c d e Dunning, John. (1998). On the Air: The Encyclopedia of Old-Time Radio. Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-507678-3. Pp. 616, 679.
  11. ^ "Thursday's Highlights". Radio and Television Mirror. 14 (6): 48. October 1940. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  12. ^ Frankern, Jerry (August 9, 1947). "Listen Carefully" (PDF). Billboard. pp. 14–15. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  13. ^ "Questions and Answers". Nebraska, Lincoln. Sunday Journal and Star. June 27, 1937. p. 40. Retrieved February 8, 2016 – via Newspaperarchive.com.  
  14. ^ Grunwald, Edgar A., Ed. (1939). Variety Radio Directory 1939-1940 (PDF). New York City: Variety, Inc. p. 506. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
  15. ^ a b Grunwald, Edgar A., Ed. (1940). Variety Radio Directory 1940-1941. Variety, Inc. P. 330.
  16. ^ "'This Small Town' Cast". Variety. October 9, 1940. p. 31. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  17. ^ Alicoate, Jack, Ed. (1942). The 1942 Radio Annual (PDF). New York City: Radio Daily Corp. p. 747. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
  18. ^ a b Brooks, Tim & Marsh, Earle (1979). The Complete Directory to Prime Time Network TV Shows: 1946-Present. Ballantine Books. ISBN 0-345-25525-9. P. 407.
  19. ^ Vernon, Terry (April 25, 1958). "Maurice Evans in 'Dial M for Murder'". California, Long Beach. Press Telegram. p. 33. Retrieved February 8, 2016 – via Newspaperarchive.com.  
  20. ^ "The Secret Storm". TV Radio Mirror. 44 (6): 60–63. November 1955. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  21. ^ McNeil, Alex (1996). Total Television. Penguin Books USA, Inc. ISBN 0-14-02-4916-8. P. 183.
  22. ^ "(photo caption)". Radio and Television Mirror. 33 (5): 60. April 1950. Retrieved 9 February 2016.
  23. ^ "N.Y. AFRA Election" (PDF). Broadcasting. December 13, 1943. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
  24. ^ "(untitled brief)" (PDF). Broadcasting. July 17, 1944. p. 61. Retrieved 8 February 2016.
  25. ^ Jostyn, Mrs. Jay (March 1946). "A very nice young man --". Radio Mirror. 25 (4): 46–47, 85–86. Retrieved 9 February 2016.

External linksEdit