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Jasmin Duehring (née Glaesser; born July 8, 1992) is a German-born Canadian cyclist, who currently rides for UCI Women's Team Sho-Air TWENTY20.[3] Duehring was part of the Canadian team that won bronze medals at the 2012 and 2016 Olympic Games in the women's team pursuit. She was also part of the team that won gold at the 2011 Pan American Games in the team pursuit.

Jasmin Duehring
UCI Track World Championships 2018 263.jpg
Personal information
Full nameJasmin Duehring
BornJasmin Glaesser
(1992-07-08) July 8, 1992 (age 27)
Paderborn, Germany
Height5 ft 4 in (163 cm)[1]
Weight125 lb (57 kg)[1]
Team information
Current teamSho-Air TWENTY20
Discipline
RoleRider
Rider type
Amateur team(s)
2012Colavita–espnW[2]
Professional team(s)
2013–2014Team TIBCO–To The Top
2015Optum–KBS
2016Rally Cycling
2017–Sho-Air TWENTY20

CareerEdit

Duehring took up cycling in 2009[4] when seeking a lower-impact sport after suffering hip injuries as a runner whilst at Terry Fox Secondary School. Glaesser also participated in ballet and figure skating whilst growing up.[5]

Her first competition for Canada was at the 2011 Pan American Games where she won gold for her new nation. Duehring then appeared for Canada at the 2012 UCI Track Cycling World Championships, there she won a silver in the points race before adding a bronze as a member of the team pursuit.[6] She built onto this the next season, where she finished in preparation for the Olympics second in the team pursuit at the Track Cycling World Cup in London in February 2012 and won bronze as a part of the Canada's women's team pursuit at the 2012 Olympics together with Tara Whitten and Gillian Carleton.[7] After winning the bronze Duehring said "We were so ready to just go out there and do our best. Team Canada, in coming here, has a saying, ‘Give Your Everything, and that was kind of our motto — leave everything out there."[8]

In 2016, she was officially named in Canada's 2016 Olympic team, and again won a bronze medal.[9]

PersonalEdit

Duehring was born in Paderborn, Germany and currently resides in Vancouver, British Columbia.[1] She moved to Canada at the age of eight when her father took a position at Simon Fraser University teaching computer science.[5] She received her Canadian citizenship shortly before the 2012 Olympics.[10]

Career resultsEdit

2011
1st Team pursuit, Pan American Games
2012
UCI Track World Championships
2nd Points race
3rd Team pursuit
3rd Team pursuit, Olympic Games
2013
1st Team pursuit, Los Angeles Grand Prix (with Allison Beveridge, Laura Brown, Gillian Carleton and Stephanie Roorda)
3rd Team pursuit, UCI Track World Championships
2014
Pan American Track Championships
1st   Points race
1st   Individual pursuit
2nd Omnium, Los Angeles Grand Prix
UCI Track World Championships
2nd Team pursuit
3rd Points race
2015
Pan American Games
1st   Road race
1st   Team pursuit (with Allison Beveridge, Laura Brown and Kirsti Lay)
2nd   Time trial
2nd   Omnium
Milton International Challenge
1st Omnium
1st Team pursuit (with Allison Beveridge, Laura Brown and Kirsti Lay)
3rd Team pursuit, UCI Track World Championships
2016
Pan American Track Championships
1st   Points race
1st   Team pursuit (with Ariane Bonhomme, Kinley Gibson and Jamie Gilgen)
3rd   Individual pursuit
UCI Track World Championships
2nd   Points race
2nd   Team pursuit (with Allison Beveridge, Kirsti Lay and Georgia Simmerling)
3rd   Team pursuit, Olympic Games (with Allison Beveridge, Kirsti Lay and Georgia Simmerling)
2017
3rd Overall Cascade Cycling Classic[11]
7th Overall Six Days of London
1st Scratch
2018
1st Overall San Dimas Stage Race
1st Stages 1 (ITT) & 2
3rd Points race, UCI Track World Championships
5th Overall Redlands Bicycle Classic
1st Stage 3
6th Overall Tour of the Gila

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d "Jasmin Glaesser". Team TIBCO–To The Top. Archived from the original on October 28, 2014. Retrieved December 6, 2014.
  2. ^ Bertine, Kathryn (July 20, 2012). "Jasmin Glaesser Races to London". espn.go.com. Retrieved December 6, 2014.
  3. ^ "Sho-Air TWENTY20 Announces 2019 Roster with 4 Canadians". CanadianCyclist.com. Canadian Cyclist. January 16, 2019. Retrieved March 9, 2019.
  4. ^ "Jasmin Glaesser Profile". Glasgow 2014. Retrieved December 6, 2014.
  5. ^ a b Pap, Elliott (July 16, 2012). "A Q&A with cycling's Jasmin Glaesser". The Province. Retrieved December 6, 2014.
  6. ^ "Jasmin Glaesser Olympic profile". Toronto Star. Archived from the original on November 10, 2012. Retrieved August 6, 2011.
  7. ^ "Canada wins bronze in women's team pursuit". CBC Sports. August 4, 2012. Archived from the original on August 6, 2012.
  8. ^ Wayne Scanlan (August 4, 2012). "Canadian women bounce back with bronze in Olympic pursuit". National Post.
  9. ^ Tozer, Jamie (June 29, 2016). "Returning Olympians highlight Canada's cycling team". www.olympic.ca. Canadian Olympic Committee. Retrieved June 29, 2016.
  10. ^ "Jasmin Glaesser profile". Canadian Olympic Committee. Retrieved August 4, 2012. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  11. ^ Malach, Pat (July 23, 2017). "Dragoo wins Cascade Cycling Classic overall". cyclingnews.com. Retrieved October 22, 2017.

External linksEdit