Janet Fitch

Janet Fitch (born November 9, 1955)[1] is most famously known as the author of the Oprah's Book Club novel White Oleander, which became a film in 2002. She is a graduate of Reed College[2].

Janet Fitch
Fitch at the book signing tent of the 2006 Texas Book Festival
Fitch at the book signing tent of the 2006 Texas Book Festival
BornJanet Elizabeth Fitch[1]
(1955-11-09) November 9, 1955 (age 64)
Los Angeles, California, US
OccupationWriter
GenreLiterary Fiction
Notable worksWhite Oleander

Fitch was born in Los Angeles, a third-generation native, and grew up in a family of voracious readers. As an undergraduate at Reed College, Fitch had decided to become a historian, attracted to its powerful narratives, the scope of events, the colossal personalities, and the potency and breadth of its themes. But when she won a student exchange to Keele University in England, where her passion for Russian history led her, she awoke in the middle of the night on her twenty-first birthday with the revelation she wanted to write fiction.[3]

Janet Fitch was a faculty member in the Master of Professional Writing Program at the University of Southern California, where she taught fiction.

Two of her favorite authors are Fyodor Dostoevsky[4] and Edgar Allan Poe.

Her third novel, Paint It Black, named after the Rolling Stones song of the same name, was published in September 2006. Amber Tamblyn directed a 2016 feature film based on the book.[5]

BooksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b California Births, 1905 – 1995, Janet Elizabeth Fitch
  2. ^ Weber ’78, John. "Revolutionary Spirit". Reed Magazine. Retrieved June 20, 2019.
  3. ^ "About Janet". Official website. janetfitchwrites.com
  4. ^ Montefiore, Simon Sebag (October 20, 2017). "One Woman's Liberation, Set Against the Russian Revolution". New York Times. Retrieved April 17, 2019.
  5. ^ Brooks, Brian (May 19, 2017). "Bryan Cranston In 'Wakefield'; Amber Tamblyn Opens Directorial Debut 'Paint It Black': Specialty Box Office Preview". Deadline. Retrieved April 17, 2019.

External linksEdit