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James E. Rogers College of Law is the law school at the University of Arizona located in Tucson, Arizona and was the first law school founded in the State of Arizona, opening its doors in 1915. Also known as University of Arizona College of Law, it was renamed in 1999 in honor of broadcasting executive and James E. Rogers, a 1962 graduate of the school, and chairman of Sunbelt Communications Company based in Las Vegas, Nevada.

James E. Rogers College of Law
Parent schoolUniversity of Arizona
Established1915
School typePublic[1]
DeanMarc L. Miller
LocationTucson, Arizona, United States
32°14′11″N 110°57′11″W / 32.236364°N 110.953041°W / 32.236364; -110.953041Coordinates: 32°14′11″N 110°57′11″W / 32.236364°N 110.953041°W / 32.236364; -110.953041
Enrollment440[1]
Faculty139[2]
USNWR ranking41[1]

Each entering class at Arizona Law has approximately 150 students, with a total student body of 500 students.

Arizona Law is fully accredited by the American Bar Association. It is currently ranked 39th nationally by U.S. News and World Report's "Best Graduate Schools 2020".[1] Arizona Law is one of 81 law schools nationwide to have a chapter of the Order of the Coif.

According to Arizona's 2017 ABA-required disclosures, 84.4% of the Class of 2017 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required or JD-advantage employment nine months after graduation.[3]

Contents

EmploymentEdit

According to Arizona's official 2013 ABA-required disclosures, 70.7% of the Class of 2013 obtained full-time, long-term, JD-required or JD-advantage employment nine months after graduation.[3] Arizona's Law School Transparency under-employment score is 21.8%, indicating the percentage of the Class of 2013 unemployed, pursuing an additional degree, or working in a non-professional, short-term, or part-time job nine months after graduation.[4] As a regional school, the vast majority of Arizona graduates are employed in Arizona.[3]

ABA Employment Summary for 2013 Graduates [5]
Employment Status Percentage
Employed - Bar Passage Required
61.22%
Employed - J.D. Advantage
14.97%
Employed - Professional Position
4.08%
Employed - Non-Professional Position
0.0%
Employed - Undeterminable
0.0%
Pursuing Graduate Degree Full Time
1.36%
Unemployed - Start Date Deferred
0.68%
Unemployed - Not Seeking
0.0%
Unemployed - Seeking
14.29%
Employment Status Unknown
3.4%
Total of 147 Graduates

CostsEdit

The total cost of attendance (indicating the cost of tuition, fees, and living expenses) for the three-year JD program at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law for the 2016–2017 academic year for Arizona Residents is $46,374.94 and $51,874.9 for Non-Residents.[6] The James E. Rogers College of Law was named a Best Value Law School in 2012.

Programs and centersEdit

In addition to the J.D. program, the school offers L.L.M. and S.J.D. degrees in Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy, and International Trade and Business Law. The International Trade and Business Law program is offered in coordination with the National Law Center for Inter-American Free Trade. Students finishing their L.L.M. degree in either program may continue on to an S.J.D. degree after completing substantial original research in their field of study. Arizona Law also offers a two-year J.D. with Advanced Standing (J.D.A.S.), designed for students who have received their first law degree from a university outside the United States.[7] This two-year J.D. provides up to one year's worth of credits (or 29 units) for non-U.S. legal studies, effectively allowing admitted students to skip the second year of law school and go directly from completing the traditional first-year curriculum to the third year of law school.

The Programs & Centers include:

  • Business Law Program
  • Criminal Law and Policy Program
  • Environmental Law, Science & Policy Program
  • The Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy Program[8]
  • International Trade and Business Law Program
  • JD Program[9]
  • Legal Writing Program
  • National Law Center
  • The William H. Rehnquist Center on the Constitutional Structures of Government[10]

The school offers J.D. students the opportunity to earn certificates in: Criminal Law & Policy,Environmental Law, Science & Policy Program, Indigenous Peoples Law and Policy and International Trade and Business Law. Arizona Law also offers concentrations in: Intellectual Property Law, International Law, and Tax Law.

FacultyEdit

Marc L. Miller is the current dean. There are 41 full-time faculty members, many of which have national and international reputations for excellence. As of July 2012, Arizona Law was one of five law schools ranked 33rd in law school faculties based on per capita scholarly impact.[11][11]

Notable alumniEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d University of Arizona (Rogers) | Best Law School | US News
  2. ^ "Faculty Directory". Archived from the original on 2012-11-08. Retrieved 2012-11-06.
  3. ^ a b c "James E. Rogers College of Law ABA-Required Disclosures" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-02-24. Retrieved 2014-08-08.
  4. ^ "James E. Rogers College of Law Profile".
  5. ^ "Employment Summary for 2013 Graduates" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2015-02-24. Retrieved 2014-08-08.
  6. ^ "Tuition and Costs". Archived from the original on 2016-04-23.
  7. ^ "J.D. with Advanced Standing". Archived from the original on 2012-10-23. Retrieved 2012-11-06.
  8. ^ "UA Outcomes Assessment — Indigenous Peoples Law & Policy Program". University of Arizona. October 2, 2017.
  9. ^ "UA Outcomes Assessment — Juris Doctor (JD)". University of Arizona. October 2, 2017.
  10. ^ "Rehnquist Center official website".
  11. ^ a b TOP 70 LAW FACULTIES IN SCHOLARLY IMPACT, 2007-2011
  12. ^ "Bobby Ray Baldock". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  13. ^ "William Docker Browning". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  14. ^ "David C. Bury". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  15. ^ "Raner Collins". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 15 December 2012.
  16. ^ "Valdemar Aguirre Cordova". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  17. ^ "William C. Frey". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  18. ^ "Dennis DeConcini". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  19. ^ "Charles Leach Hardy". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  20. ^ "Cindy K. Jorgenson". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  21. ^ "Ann Kirkpatrick". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  22. ^ "Jon Kyl". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  23. ^ "Stephen M. McNamee". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  24. ^ "Alfredo Chavez Marquez". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  25. ^ "Charles Andrew Muecke". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  26. ^ "Christina Reiss". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  27. ^ "Mary Anne Richey". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  28. ^ "John Roll". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  29. ^ "Paul Gerhardt Rosenblatt". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  30. ^ "Eldon Rudd". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  31. ^ "James A. Teilborg". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  32. ^ "Harry Clay Westover". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.
  33. ^ "Frank R. Zapata". Biographical Directory of Federal Judges. Retrieved 16 December 2012.

External linksEdit