Open main menu

James Craggs the Younger PC (9 April 1686 – 16 February 1721), was an English statesman.


James Craggs
James Craggs the Younger by Sir Godfrey Kneller, Bt.jpg
Portrait by Sir Godfrey Kneller, c. 1708
Secretary at War
In office
1717–1718
Preceded byWilliam Pulteney
Succeeded byThe Viscount Castlecomer
Secretary of State for the Southern Department
In office
1718–1721
Preceded byJoseph Addison
Succeeded byThe Lord Carteret
Personal details
Born(1686-04-09)9 April 1686
Died16 February 1721(1721-02-16) (aged 34)

LifeEdit

Craggs was born at Westminster, the son of James Craggs the Elder. Part of his early life was spent abroad, where he made the acquaintance of George Louis, Elector of Hanover, afterwards King George I of Great Britain. In 1713 he became Member of Parliament for Tregony, in 1717 Secretary at War, and in the following year Secretary of State for the Southern Department. Craggs was implicated in the South Sea Bubble, but not so deeply as his father, whom he predeceased, dying on 16 February 1721, aged 34. Among Craggs's friends were Alexander Pope (who wrote the epitaph on his monument in Westminster Abbey), Joseph Addison and John Gay.

James Craggs left an illegitimate daughter, Harriot Craggs, by the noted dancer and actress Hester Santlow. Harriot married firstly in 1726 to Richard Eliot, having nine children including Edward Craggs-Eliot, 1st Baron Eliot and secondly in 1749 to John Hamilton by whom she had a son.

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit

  • "Archival material relating to James Craggs the Younger". UK National Archives.  
Parliament of Great Britain
Preceded by
Edward Southwell
George Robinson
Member of Parliament for Tregony
1713–1721
With: Sir Edmund Prideaux, Bt 1713–1720
Charles Talbot 1720–1721
Succeeded by
Charles Talbot
Daniel Pulteney
Political offices
Preceded by
William Pulteney
Secretary at War
1717–1718
Succeeded by
The Viscount Castlecomer
Preceded by
Joseph Addison
Secretary of State for the Southern Department
1718–1721
Succeeded by
The Lord Carteret