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James Bamford White (June 6, 1842 – March 25, 1931) was a U.S. Representative from Kentucky.

James Bamford White
A man with dark hair and a mustache wearing a black jacket and tie and white shirt
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 10th district
In office
March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1903
Preceded byThomas Y. Fitzpatrick
Succeeded byFrancis A. Hopkins
Personal details
Born(1842-06-06)June 6, 1842
Clark County, Kentucky
DiedMarch 25, 1931(1931-03-25) (aged 88)
Irvine, Kentucky
Resting placeOak Dale Cemetery
Political partyDemocratic
Alma materMount Zion Academy
ProfessionLawyer
Military service
Allegiance Confederate States of America
Branch/service Confederate States Army
Years of service1863 – 1865
Battles/warsAmerican Civil War

Born near Winchester, Kentucky, White attended the common schools and the Mount Zion Academy, Macon County, Illinois. He entered the Confederate States Army in the fall of 1863 and served in the commands of Generals Breckinridge and Morgan until the close of the Civil War, when he was honorably discharged. He engaged in teaching at Irvine, Kentucky. He studied law while teaching. He was admitted to the bar in 1867 and commenced the practice of law in Irvine. He served as prosecuting attorney of Estill County 1872-1880.

White was elected as a Democrat to the Fifty-seventh Congress (March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1903). He continued the practice of his profession in Irvine, Kentucky, until his retirement in 1919. He died in Irvine, Kentucky, March 25, 1931. He was interred in Oakdale Cemetery.

ReferencesEdit

  • United States Congress. "James Bamford White (id: W000379)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.

  This article incorporates public domain material from the Biographical Directory of the United States Congress website http://bioguide.congress.gov.

U.S. House of Representatives
Preceded by
Thomas Y. Fitzpatrick
Member of the U.S. House of Representatives
from Kentucky's 10th congressional district

March 4, 1901 – March 3, 1903 (obsolete district)
Succeeded by
Francis A. Hopkins