Jakob Balde (January 4, 1604 – August 9, 1668), a German poet who wrote primarily in Neo-Latin (New Latin) rather than in his native German language, was born at Ensisheim in Alsace.

Jakob Balde
Muc Ruhmeshalle W18 Jacob Balde.jpg
Fidelis Schönlaub, Bust of Jakob Balde at Ruhmeshalle ("Hall of fame"), München, Germany.
Born4 January 1604 Edit this on Wikidata
Ensisheim Edit this on Wikidata
Died9 August 1668 Edit this on Wikidata (aged 64)
Neuburg an der Donau Edit this on Wikidata
OccupationWriter, poet Edit this on Wikidata

BiographyEdit

Driven from Alsace by the marauding bands of Count Mansfeld, he fled to Ingolstadt where he began to study law. A love disappointment, however, turned his thoughts to the church, and in 1624 he entered the Society of Jesus. Continuing his study of the humanities, he became in 1628 professor of rhetoric at Innsbruck, and in 1635 at Ingolstadt, whither he had been transferred by his superiors in order to study theology. In 1633 he was ordained a priest.

His lectures and poems had now made him famous, and he was summoned to Munich where, in 1638, he became court chaplain to the elector Maximilian I. He remained in Munich till 1650, when he went to live at Landshut and afterwards at Amberg. In 1654 he was transferred to Neuburg on the Danube, as court preacher and confessor to the count palatine. He remained at Neuburg for the rest of his life.

A collected edition of Balde's works in 4 vols was published at Cologne in 1660; a more complete edition in 8 vols at Munich, 1729; also a good selection by L. Spach (Paris and Strasbourg, 1871). An edition of his Latin lyrics was edited by Benno Müller in 1844 in Munich and another edition also appeared at Regensburg in 1884. There are translations into German of some of his odes by Johann Gottfried Herder (1795), his satires by Johannes Neubig (Munich, 1833) and J. Schrott and M. Schleich (Munich, 1870). See G. Westermayer, Jacobus Balde, sein Leben und seine Werke (1868); J. Bach, Jakob Balde (Freiburg, 1904). Various odes have been translated into English by Karl Maurer.

WorksEdit

 
Jacob Balde, Lyricorum libri IV, Lowijs Elzevier (III), Jost Kalckhoven, Cologne, 1645.
  • Balde, Jakob (1635). Epithalamion (in Latin). Monachii. Formis Cornelii Leysserii Electoralis Typographi et Bibliopolae. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1636). De vanitate mundi (in Latin). Monachii. Formis Cornelii Leysserii Electoralis Typographi et Bibliopolae. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1637). Batrachomyomachia Homeri, tuba Romana cantata, et aevo nostro accommodata (in Latin). Ingolstadt. Gregor Hänlin. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1638). Agathyrsus (in Latin). Monachii. typis Corn. Leyserii. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1643). Iacobi Balde è Societate Iesv Lyricorvm Lib. IV.: Epodon Lib. Vnus (in Latin). Monachii. typis Corn. Leyserii. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1643). Iacobi Balde è Societate Jesv Sylvarum Libri VII (in Latin). Monachii. typis Corn. Leyserii. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1647). Agathyrsus teutsch (in German). München. bey Lucas Straub. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1651). Medicinae Gloria Per Satyras XXII. Asserta (in Latin). Monachii. Wagner. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1654). Iephtias: Tragoedia (in Latin). Ambergae. Haugenhofer. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1657). Satyra contra abusum Tabaci ad Aemilianum Aloysium Guevarram (in Latin). Monachii. Wagnerus. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1658). Vultuosæ torvitatis encomium. In gratiam philosophorum, ac poetarum explicatum (in Latin). Monachii. Sumptibus I. Wagneri. Retrieved 25 May 2019.
  • Balde, Jakob (1663). Urania victrix (in Latin). Monachii. Typis J.W. Scheli. Retrieved 25 May 2019.

ReferencesEdit

External linksEdit