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Jain temples, Halebidu

Jain Basadi complex in Halebidu, Hassan district consists of three Jain Basadis (Basti or temples) dedicated to the Jain Tirtankars Parshvanatha, Shantinatha and Adinatha. The complex is situated near Kedareshwara temple and Dwarasamudra lake. These temples were constructed in 12th century during the reign of Hoysala Empire along with Kedareshwara temple and Hoysaleswara Temple are now proposed as UNESCO World Heritage Site.

Jain Basadis of Halebidu
Profile of the Parshvanatha basadi (1133 AD) at Halebidu.JPG
Parshvanatha Basadi
Basic information
Location Hassan, Karnataka, India
Geographic coordinates 13°12′31.2″N 75°59′42.4″E / 13.208667°N 75.995111°E / 13.208667; 75.995111Coordinates: 13°12′31.2″N 75°59′42.4″E / 13.208667°N 75.995111°E / 13.208667; 75.995111
Affiliation Jainism
Deity Parshvanatha, Shantinatha and Adinatha
Festivals Mahavir Jayanti
Architectural description
Creator Vishnuvardhana, Veera Ballala II
Date established 12th century
Temple(s) 3

Contents

HistoryEdit

Halebidu was capital of the Hoysala Empire between the 11th to 14th century when Jainism maintained a strong presence in the region. Bittiga (later became Vishnuvardhana), is considered the greatest king of Hoysala kingdom was a Jain till around 1115 after which he converted to Vaishnavism under the influence of the Hindu saint Ramanujacharya.[1] However, his wife Shantala Devi remained a follower of Jainism.[2][3] There are three basads in this complex :[4]

The Parshvanatha Basadi was built by Boppadeva in 1133 A.D. during the reign of King Vishnuvardhana. Boppadeva was the son of the notable Gangaraja, a minister under Hoysala King Vishnuvardhana. The construction of the temple coincided with the victory of Narasimha I as the royal heir to the throne. The deity therefore is called Vijaya Parsvanatha (lit, "victorious Parsvanatha").[5]

The Shantinatha Basadi was built around 1192 A.D., during the reign of Veera Ballala II.[6]

The Adinatha Basadi is the smallest of the Jain basadis also built in 12th century.[7] A monolith of Bahubali which was present inside this temple but now displayed outside Halebidu museum.[8][9]

ArchitectureEdit

Parshvanatha Basadi is notable for its architecture, beautiful navaranga halls and exquisite carvings on the lathe turned pillars.[10][11] The temple has a Ardhamandapa ("half hall") and a Mahamandapa ("great hall") with a monolithic of the deity Parshvanatha that is 18 feet (5.5 m) tall. Sculptures of yaksha and yakshi Padmavati are present in the mahamantapa.[12] This temple is the largest among three Jain basadis in Halebidu. The temple also has niches for idols of the 24 tirthankaras.[13]

Shantinatha Basadi consist of a garbhagriha ("sanctum"), ardhamandapa, mahamandapa, large granite pillars with the inner sanctum consisting of a 18 feet (5.5 m) image of the deity Shantinatha.[14]

Adinatha Basadi is a small non-ornate temple consisting of garbhagriha, mandapa ("hall") with the image of the deity Adinatha and the Hindu goddess Saraswati.[15]

RestorationEdit

These Jain basadi complex is protected by Archaeological Survey of India and are now proposed as UNESCO World Heritage Site.[16][17]

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

CitationEdit

  1. ^ Stein 1989, p. 16.
  2. ^ Menon 2013, p. 127.
  3. ^ Kurt & Bruhn 1998, p. 50.
  4. ^ "World Heritage Sites (TENTATIVE LIST)". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  5. ^ "Parsvanatha Basti, Halebid". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  6. ^ "Shantinatha Basti, Halebid". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  7. ^ "Adinatha Basti, Halebid". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  8. ^ Kurt & Bruhn 1998, p. 51.
  9. ^ "Archaeological Museum, Halebid". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved December 28, 2017.
  10. ^ Varadpande 1987, p. 142.
  11. ^ Tourist Guide to South India. Sura Books. 2003. p. 208. ISBN 9788174781758.
  12. ^ "Parsvanatha Basti, Halebid". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  13. ^ "Sacred Ensembles of the Hoysala". UNESCO. Retrieved December 28, 2017.
  14. ^ "Shantinatha Basti, Halebid". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  15. ^ "Adinatha Basti, Halebid". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved June 10, 2017.
  16. ^ "Bangalore Circle". Archaeological Survey of India. Retrieved December 28, 2017.
  17. ^ "Sacred Ensembles of the Hoysala". UNESCO. Retrieved December 28, 2017.

SourceEdit