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Jaideva Singh (19 September 1893 [nb 1] in Shoratgarh, Uttar Pradesh[2] – 27 May 1986 in [3] Banaras) was an Indian musicologist and philosopher. He played a key role in the development of All India Radio where he was chief producer.[4][5] He was influenced by the Indian musicologist Vishnu Narayan Bhatkhande.[6]

Thakur

Jaideva Singh
Born(1893-09-19)19 September 1893
Died27 May 1986(1986-05-27) (aged 92)

Singh was a renowned scholar in the Kashmir Saivism school of Indian philosophy,[7][8] a subject he studied for many years with Swami Lakshman Joo in Kashmir. He prepared and published first-ever English and Hindi translations of a number of Shaivite scriptures.[9] Singh was appointed as the Chairman of the Uttar Pradesh Sangeet Natak Akademi in 1973. He was awarded the Padma Bhushan in 1974 for his contribution to music.

Contents

Selected worksEdit

  • Introduction to Madhyamaka Philosophy, Bharatiya Vidya Prakashan, Varanasi, 1968.
  • Pratyabhijnahrdayam: The Secret of Self-Recognition, by Kṣemarāja, translation, Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1977.
  • Vijnanabhairava or Divine Consciousness: A Treasury of 112 Types of Yoga, translation, Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1979.
  • Siva Sutras: The Yoga of Supreme Identity, by Vasugupta, translation, Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1979.
  • Spanda-Karikas: The Divine Creative Pulsation, by Vasugupta, translation, Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1980.
  • Para-trisika-Vivarana by Abhinavagupta: The Secret of Tantric Mysticism, by Abhinavagupta, translation, Motilal Banarsidass, Delhi, 1988.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ Some sources state 1896[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Menon, Rekha (1961). Cultural Profiles. Inter-National Cultural Centre. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  2. ^ Journal of the Indian Musicological Society. Indian Musicological Society. 1986. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  3. ^ Misra, Susheela (1 January 2001). Among contemporary musicians. Harman Pub. House. p. 232. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  4. ^ Roy, Ashok (2 February 2004). Music makers: living legends of Indian classical music. Rupa & Co. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  5. ^ Gowri Ramnarayan (17 April 2009). "Finding her own voice". The Hindu. Retrieved 30 May 2013.
  6. ^ Bakhle, Janaki (17 September 2005). Two Men and Music: Nationalism in the Making of an Indian Classical Tradition. Oxford University Press. p. 258. ISBN 978-0-19-534731-9. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  7. ^ Rastogi, Navjivan (1987). Introduction to the Tantrāloka: a study in structure. Motilal Banarsidass. p. 14. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  8. ^ Rastogi, Navjivan (1 January 1979). The krama tantricism of Kashmir: historical and general sources. Motilal Banarsidass. Retrieved 4 August 2013.
  9. ^ Saints and Sages of Kashmir. APH Publishing. 1 January 2004. p. 297. ISBN 978-81-7648-576-0. Retrieved 4 August 2013.

External linksEdit