Jagdamba (Sanskrit: जगदम्बा), also known as Devi Jagdamba, Jagdamba Mata, Jagdambika or Amba-bai, is a term used for a Hindu goddess. The term Jagdamba means "Universe Mother". The term Jagdamba is generally used for the goddesses Adi Parashakti, Lakshmi and Parvati.

Shakti as Jagdamba creates the universe

The term Jagdamba is widely used in Gujarat, as there a festival dedicated to her called Navaratri is celebrated every year.

Bhavani as Jagdamba is worshipped by the Peshwa and Maratha.[1] In Maharashtra an alternative term Amba bai is Mahalakshmi.[2] In Ramcharitmanas, Tulsidas uses the term Jagdamba to refer to Sita.[3][4] In a version[which?] of the epic Ramayana, Parvati is mentioned as Jagdamba.[citation needed]

ScripturesEdit

In Ramcharitmanas, a version of Ramayana by Tulsidas, after Angadha meeting Ravana, Angadha said to him - as in the words of the poet:

नृप अभिमान मोह बस किंबा।
हरि आनिहु सीता जगदंबा॥
अब सुभ कहा सुनहु तुम्ह मोरा।
सब अपराध छमिहि प्रभु तोरा॥
सादर जनकसुता करि आगें।
एहि बिधि चलहु सकल भय त्यागें॥

This translates to:

"O King of Lanka, either out of pride or lust you had kidnapped Jagdamba (mother of the world) Sita, wife of Hari (Rama). The best course now would be to proceed with Shri Sita to restore her to Shri Rama without any apprehension".[5][6]

LegendsEdit

In the epic Ramayana, the protagonist, Rama, was wondering along a path when he came upon the village, Tahakari. His mind in a distressed state, Rama picked and smelled flowers in an attempt to calm his nerves, unaware of Shiva and Parvati watching him from the skies. As Rama wept for his deceased wife, Sita, Shiva attempted to convince Parvati that Rama was indeed an avatar of Vishnu. Parvati remained unconvinced of this, and decided to test this theory. Appearing as Sita in front of Lord Rama, both Shiva and Rama saw that Parvati was not Sita. In reply to her costume, Rama asked Parvati: "Oh mother, have you come to earth to visit me?" Rama smirked as he spoke his words. Embarrassed as Parvati realized her plot did not unfold as it was meant to, she ran away from Shiva's mocking cries and taunts, for they had become too much. When Parvati finally came back to the palace, she then stood before them as Jagdamba Mata.[7][better source needed]

TemplesEdit

Jagadamba temple.in tuljapur Maharashtra

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ George, K. M. (1992). Modern Indian Literature, an Anthology: Plays and prose. Sahitya Akademi. ISBN 978-81-7201-783-5.
  2. ^ Tate, Karen (2005). Sacred Places of Goddess: 108 Destinations. CCC Publishing. p. 197. ISBN 9781888729177.
  3. ^ G. N. Das (1998). Shri Rama: The Man and His Mission. Abhinav Publications. p. 87. ISBN 978-8170173632.
  4. ^ R. C. Dwivedi (1994). Gosvāmī Tulasīdāsakr̥ta Śrīrāmacaritamānasa. Motilal Banarsidass. p. 592.
  5. ^ R. C. Dwivedi (1994). Gosvāmī Tulasīdāsakr̥ta Śrīrāmacaritamānasa. Motilal Banarsidass. p. 592.
  6. ^ G. N. Das (1998). Shri Rama: The Man and His Mission. Abhinav Publications. p. 87. ISBN 978-8170173632.
  7. ^ Story of the goddess