Jérôme Golmard

Jérôme Golmard (9 September 1973 – 31 July 2017)[1] was a French tennis player.

Jérôme Golmard
Jérôme Golmard.jpg
Golmard in 2012
Country (sports) France
Born(1973-09-09)9 September 1973
Dijon, France
Died31 July 2017(2017-07-31) (aged 43)
Height1.88 m (6 ft 2 in)
Turned pro1993
Retired2006
PlaysLeft-handed (two-handed backhand)
Prize money$2,215,784
Singles
Career record144–143 (ATP Tour, Grand Slams and in Davis Cup)
Career titles2
Highest rankingNo. 22 (26 April 1999)
Grand Slam Singles results
Australian Open3R (1998, 2002)
French Open2R (1997)
Wimbledon3R (1998, 2000)
US Open3R (2000)
Doubles
Career record19–32 (ATP Tour, Grand Slams and in Davis Cup)
Career titles0
Highest rankingNo. 143 (12 October 1998)
Grand Slam Doubles results
French Open1R (1994, 1995, 1996, 1998, 2001, 2003)
US Open1R (1998)

The left-hander reached a career-high singles ranking of World No. 22 in April 1999, winning 2 singles titles and reaching the semifinals of Monte Carlo in 1999. Golmard finished his career with over $2.2 million in prize money. Among the many notable players he beat on the ATP Tour are former World No. 1s Andre Agassi, Jim Courier, Gustavo Kuerten, Juan Carlos Ferrero, Marcelo Ríos and Carlos Moyá, as well as Grand Slam champions Richard Krajicek, Goran Ivanišević, Albert Costa, Gastón Gaudio, Thomas Johansson and Michael Chang.

He announced in 2014 that he was diagnosed with motor neuron disease, which causes muscle paralysis, and died of the disease on 31 July 2017.[2]

Career finalsEdit

Singles: 4 (2 wins, 2 losses)Edit

Result W/L Date Tournament Surface Opponent Score
Win 1. Feb 1999 Dubai Tennis Championships Hard   Nicolas Kiefer 6–4, 6–2
Win 2. Jan 2000 Chennai Open Hard   Markus Hantschk 6–3, 6–7(6–8), 6–3
Loss 1. Jul 2001 Croatia Open Clay   Carlos Moyá 4–6, 6–3, 6–7(2–7)
Loss 2. Jan 2002 Auckland Open Hard   Greg Rusedski 7–6(7–0), 4–6, 5–7

Doubles: 1 final (1 runner-up)Edit

Result W/L Date Tournament Surface Partner Opponents Score
Loss 1. Jul 2000 Swiss Open Clay   Michael Kohlmann   Jiří Novák
  David Rikl
6–3, 3–6, 4–6

After tennisEdit

Golmard was diagnosed with motor neurone disease in 2014 and died on 31 July 2017, at the age of 43.[3]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Carnet Noir - Jérôme Golmard est décédé à l\'âge de 43 ans". www.tennisactu.net.
  2. ^ "Jerome Golmard: 1973-2017". ATP Tour. Association of Tennis Professionals. 1 August 2017.
  3. ^ "Former No. 22, two-time ATP title winner Jerome Golmard dies at 43". Tennis Magazine. 1 August 2017. Retrieved 1 August 2017.

External linksEdit