Jérémie

Jérémie (Haitian Creole: Jeremi) is a commune and capital city of the Grand'Anse department in Haiti. It had a population of about 31,000 at the 2003 census. It is relatively isolated from the rest of the country. The Grande-Anse River flows near the city.

Jérémie

Jeremi
Jérémie (2007)
Jérémie (2007)
Nickname(s): 
La Cité des Poètes
The City of Poets[1]
Jérémie is located in Haiti
Jérémie
Jérémie
Location in Haiti
Coordinates: 18°39′0″N 74°7′0″W / 18.65000°N 74.11667°W / 18.65000; -74.11667Coordinates: 18°39′0″N 74°7′0″W / 18.65000°N 74.11667°W / 18.65000; -74.11667
CountryHaiti
DepartmentGrand'Anse
ArrondissementJérémie
Founded1756[1]
Government
 • MayorRonald Étienne
Population
 (2003)
 • Metro
31,000
Time zoneUTC-5 (Eastern)
Centre of Jérémie (2006)
Jérémie (2007)

Jérémie is called the city of the poets because of the numerous writers, poets, and historians born there.[2]

HistoryEdit

In 1964, during the Jérémie Vespers, the Haitian army and the Tonton Macoutes massacred 27 people in Jérémie.[3]

In the early 2000s, archaeologists uncovered an ancient synagogue of Crypto-Jews in the city, the only one found on the island. Jérémie has historically been inhabited by many mixed-race families of Jewish descent.[4]

In the aftermath of the 2010 earthquake, a food aid convoy transporting aid delivered to Jérémie Airport through Jérémie, encountered a hijacking attempt by 20 men, on 30 January 2010.[5] Medical supplies have also been airlifted through the airport, due to the increase in medical needs from injured refugees arriving in the wake of the quake.[6]

In October 2016, Jeremie was almost completely destroyed by Hurricane Matthew as it went past Haiti.[7]

Roughly 40 nautical miles (46 mi; 74 km) west of the city lies Navassa Island, which is claimed by Haiti and the United States.[8]

FacilitiesEdit

The city has an airport, Jérémie Airport. The Airport of Jérémie is known as the area of " Numero Deux". Mission Aviation Fellowship conducts charter flights into the airport.

Locations in JérémieEdit

Beaudrouin, Campagne, Carrefour Sanon, Dayere, Duranton, La Forêt, Leopold, Lori, Marche Leon, Previle, Rampe des Lions and Sassierrrve

Notable natives and residentsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Press, ed. (1963). "Haiti". Pan American Union. Dept. of Information and Public Affairs. p. 1930. Retrieved 11 November 2015.
  2. ^ "Jérémie – A view from our author". Archived from the original on 1 February 2015. Retrieved 26 January 2015.
  3. ^ Bain de Sang, by 'Albert D. Chasagne
  4. ^ Press, ed. (13 February 2004). "Around the Jewish World As Haiti Burns, Its Few Jews Choose Business over Politics". JTA (Jewish Telegraphic Agency). Retrieved 29 April 2019.
  5. ^ Newser, "Food convoy attacked by armed group in Haiti; UN warns of volatile security situation"[permanent dead link], Paisley Doods, 2 February 2010 (accessed 3 February 2010)
  6. ^ New York Times, "Volunteers Fly Supplies Into Hard-to-Reach Areas", Shaila Dewan, 4 February 2010 (accessed 4 February 2010)
  7. ^ "Hurricane Matthew: New images show scale of Haiti destruction". BBC. 6 October 2016. Retrieved 6 October 2016.
  8. ^ Rohter, Larry (19 October 1998). "Whose Rock Is It? Yes, the Haitians Care". Port-au-Prince Journal. New York Times. Retrieved 28 January 2012.
  9. ^ Scott, Rebecca J.; Hébrard, Jean M. (2012). Freedom Papers: An Atlantic Odyssey in the Age of Emancipation. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. pp. 20, 77, 90. ISBN 978-0-674-06516-1.