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Ismailia Governorate (Arabic: محافظة الإسماعيليةMuḥāfāzah Al Ismāʿīliya, IPA: [muˈħɑfzˤah alʔesmæʕeˈlejjæ]) is one of the Canal Zone governorates of Egypt. Located in the northeastern part of the country, its capital is the city of Ismailia. It was named after Ismail Pasha, who as Ottoman Viceroy of Egypt, oversaw the country during the building of the Suez Canal.[6] It is located between the other two Canal governorates; Port Said Governorate, in the Northern part of Egypt and Suez Governorate.[7]

Ismailia Governorate
Flag of Ismailia Governorate
Flag
Ismailia Governorate on the map of Egypt
Ismailia Governorate on the map of Egypt
Country Egypt
SeatIsmailia (capital)
Government
 • GovernorHamdi Hamed Mohamed Osman[1]
Area
 • Total5,066 km2 (1,956 sq mi)
Population
 (January 2018)
 • Total1,325,000[4]
Time zoneUTC+2 (EET)
HDI (2017)0.707[5]
high · 8th
Websitehttp://www.ismailia.gov.eg
Fayed War Cemetery
Boats in Great Bitter Lake (Fayed)
YearPop.±%
1966 345,000—    
1976 351,889+2.0%
1986 544,427+54.7%
1996 715,009+31.3%
2006 942,832+31.9%
2015 1,178,641+25.0%
1966–2006, 2015 is an estimate[8]

Contents

Municipal divisionsEdit

The governorate is divided into municipal divisions, with a total estimated population as of July 2017 of 1,309,474. In the case of Ismailia governorate, there are 4 kism, 5 markaz and 1 new city.[2][9]

The divisions are generally seven: Ismailia which is the capital, Tell El Kebir, Abu Suwir, Qassasin, Fayid, Qantara West and Qantara East.[10][11]

Municipal Divisions
Anglicized name Native name Arabic transliteration Population
(July 2017 Est.)
Type
Abu Suwir مركز ابو صوير Abū Ṣuwīr 206,863 Markaz
Ismailia مركز الاسماعيلية Al-Ismā'īliyah 160,462 Markaz
Ismailia 1 قسم أول الاسماعيلية Al-Ismā'īliyah 1 43,226 Kism (fully urban)
Ismailia 2 قسم ثان الاسماعيلية Al-Ismā'īliyah 2 229,209 Kism (fully urban)
Ismailia 3 قسم ثالث الاسماعيلية Al-Ismā'īliyah 3 113,937 Kism (fully urban)
El Qantara مركز القنطرة Al-Qanṭarah 149,171 Markaz
El Qantara El Sharqiya قسم القنطرة شرق Al-Qanṭarah Sharq 56,536 Kism (urban and rural parts)
New Kasaseen مركز القصاصين الجديده Al-Qaṣāṣīn al-Jadīdah 100,000 New City
Tell El Kebir مركز التل الكبير At-Tall al-Kabīr 93,000 Markaz
Fayid مركز فايد Fa'id 136,438 Markaz

PopulationEdit

According to population estimates, in 2015 the majority of residents in the governorate lived in rural areas, with an urbanization rate of only 45.4%. Out of an estimated 1,178,641 people residing in the governorate, 643,778 people lived in rural areas as opposed to only 534,863 in urban areas.[12]

Cities and townsEdit

As of 2017, seven cities (or towns) in Ismailia had a population of over 15,000 inhabitants.[13]

Cities and towns with over 15,000 inhabitants
Anglicized name Native name Arabic transliteration Nov. 1996 Census Nov. 2006 Census Population
(July 2017 Est.)
Abu Suwir El Mahata أبو صوير المحطة Abū Ṣuwayr al-Maḥaṭṭah 18,331 24,265 29,476
Ismalia الإسماعيلية Al-Ismā'īliyah 255,134 293,184 386,372
El Qantara القنطره Al-Qantarah 15,054 29,505 42,818
El Qantara El Sharqiya القنطرة شرق Al-Qanṭarah Sharq 12,116 20,685 28,613
New Kasaseen القصاصين الجديدة Al-Qaṣāṣīn al-Jadīdah 11,948 15,611 22,000
Tell El Kebir التل الكبير At-Tall al-Kabīr 31,410 26,891 37,000
Fayid فايد Fa'id 15,652 21,808 31,545

Industrial zonesEdit

According to the Egyptian Governing Authority for Investment and Free Zones (GAFI), in affiliation with the Ministry of Investment (MOI), the following industrial zones are located in this governorate:[14]

  • Al Qantara Shark
  • The 1st industrial zone
  • Technology Valley
  • The 2nd industrial zone
  • Abu Khalifa

Annual film festivalEdit

Hashim El Nahas founded the Ismailia International Film Festival for Documentaries and Shorts and originally considered establishing it in Luxor. Instead this festival has been celebrating its annual events in Ismailia Governorate. It is sponsored by the Ministry of Culture, Ismailia Governorate, The National Cinema Center and other sponsors.[15]

Ismailia CanalEdit

The Ismailia Governorate is on the banks of the Suez Canal and its Ismailia Canal extends from the Nile River near Cairo, to the Suez Canal at the city of Ismailia, on Lake Timsah.[16] The Ismailia Canal was built to provide fresh water to workers during the building of the Suez Canal.[7] The Suez Canal Authority headquarters is located in Ismailia.[17]

Conflicts and warsEdit

From 1967 to 1970, Ismailia became a war zone and was damaged in the conflict with Israel. Many battles were fought, in and around Ismailia, including at the end of the conflict in the Battle of Ismailia[18] and the area was able to begin rebuilding after a cease-fire was negotiated between Egypt and Israel in 1973.[19][20]

Fishing landing sitesEdit

There are several official fishing landing sites in Ismailia. One is at Lake Timsah and the other at Bitter Lake.[21][22]

UN sustainable programmeEdit

After a successful SIP (Sustainable Ismailia Programme) from 1992-1997, the United Nations expanded the project to include the entire Governorate of Ismailia calling it SGIP (Sustainable Ismailia Governorate Programme). Its goal is to work with local partners to improve the communities in Ismailia.[23]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "رسمياً.. المحافظون الجدد ونوابهم يؤدون اليمين الدستورية أمام الرئيس". Almasry Alyoum (in Arabic). 30 August 2018. Archived from the original on 2018-08-31. Retrieved 2018-08-31.
  2. ^ a b "Ismailia Governorate Subdivisions". CityPopulation.de. Archived from the original on 2018-11-24. Retrieved 2018-11-24.
  3. ^ "About the governorate". www.ismailia.gov.eg. Retrieved 13 December 2018.
  4. ^ "Population Estimates By Governorate ( Urban /Rural ) 1/1/2018". www.capmas.gov.eg. Archived from the original on 2018-11-02. Retrieved 10 October 2018.
  5. ^ "Sub-national HDI - Area Database - Global Data Lab". hdi.globaldatalab.org. Retrieved 2018-09-13.
  6. ^ "Ismail-Pasha". Britannica. Archived from the original on 19 October 2016. Retrieved 16 October 2016.
  7. ^ a b "Al-Ismailiyyah". Britannica. Archived from the original on 19 October 2016. Retrieved 17 October 2016.
  8. ^ "Ismailia Population, 1966–2006". Statoids. Archived from the original on October 14, 2016. Retrieved October 16, 2016.
  9. ^ "Markazes of Egypt". statoids.com. Gwillim Law. Archived from the original on 2017-10-19. Retrieved 26 November 2018.
  10. ^ "Ismailia site". ismailia.gov.eg (in Arabic). Ismailia Government.
  11. ^ "Map of Ismailia". ismailia.gov.eg. Ismailia Government. Archived from the original on 2018-02-24. Retrieved 2018-11-26.
  12. ^ "Population Estimates By Sex & Governorate 1/1/2015" (PDF). CAPMAS. Archived (PDF) from the original on 19 October 2015. Retrieved 23 October 2016.
  13. ^ "Cities". CityPopulation.de. Archived from the original on 2018-10-05. Retrieved 2018-11-24.
  14. ^ "Industrial Zones of Governorate". Ministry of Investment Egypt. Archived from the original on 2018-11-23. Retrieved 23 November 2018.
  15. ^ "Ismailia International Film Festival For Documentaries and Shorts". Ismailia FilmFestival. Archived from the original on 23 October 2016. Retrieved 23 October 2016.
  16. ^ Merriam Webster's Geographical Dictionary (3rd ed.). 1997. p. 535. ISBN 0-87779-546-0.
  17. ^ "Suez Canal". Suez Canal Government of Egypt. Archived from the original on 2016-10-18. Retrieved 2016-10-17.
  18. ^ Dunstan, Simon. The Yom Kippur War 1973 (2): The Sinai. Bloomsbury Publishing. p. 9.
  19. ^ Tucker, Spencer C. (2015). Wars That Changed History: 50 of the World's Greatest Conflicts. ABC-CLIO. p. 549. ISBN 9781610697866.
  20. ^ Potholm, Christian P. (2016). Understanding War: An Annotated Bibliography. UPA. p. 584. ISBN 9780761867746.
  21. ^ "Fishery and Aquaculture Country Profiles The Arab Republic of Egypt". Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations. Archived from the original on 16 October 2016. Retrieved 16 October 2016.
  22. ^ "Information on Fisheries Management in the Arab Republic of Egypt". FOA. Archived from the original on 6 April 2012. Retrieved 16 October 2016.
  23. ^ Sustainable Cities Programme 1990-2000: A Decade of United Nations Support for Broad-based Participatory Management of Urban Development. UN. 2002. p. 30.

Further readingEdit

External linksEdit