Intercellular adhesion molecule

In molecular biology, intercellular adhesion molecules (ICAMs) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) are part of the immunoglobulin superfamily. They are important in inflammation, immune responses and in intracellular signalling events.[1] The ICAM family consists of five members, designated ICAM-1 to ICAM-5. They are known to bind to leucocyte integrins CD11/CD18 such as LFA-1 and Macrophage-1 antigen, during inflammation and in immune responses. In addition, ICAMs may exist in soluble forms in human plasma, due to activation and proteolysis mechanisms at cell surfaces.

Intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), N-terminal domain
PDB 1iam EBI.jpg
structure of the two amino-terminal domains of human intercellular adhesion molecule-1, icam-1
Identifiers
SymbolICAM_N
PfamPF03921
Pfam clanCL0011
InterProIPR013768
SCOP21zxq / SCOPe / SUPFAM
Membranome219

Mammalian intercellular adhesion molecules include:

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Gahmberg CG, Tolvanen M, Kotovuori P (April 1997). "Leukocyte adhesion--structure and function of human leukocyte beta2-integrins and their cellular ligands". Eur. J. Biochem. 245 (2): 215–32. doi:10.1111/j.1432-1033.1997.00215.x. PMID 9151947.
This article incorporates text from the public domain Pfam and InterPro: IPR013768