Inferior ganglion of vagus nerve

The inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve, (nodose ganglion) is a sensory ganglion of the peripheral nervous system. It is located within the jugular foramen where the vagus nerve exits the skull. It is larger than and below the superior ganglion of the vagus nerve.[1][2]

Inferior ganglion of vagus nerve
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Pathway of upper portions of glossopharyngeal, vagus, and accessory nerves. The inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve is labeled as ‘Gang. Nodosum’.
Details
Fromvagus nerve
Identifiers
LatinGanglion nodosum,
ganglion inferius nervi vagi
MeSHD009620
TA98A14.2.01.157
TA26336
FMA6230
Anatomical terms of neuroanatomy

StructureEdit

The neurons in the inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve are pseudounipolar and provide sensory innervation (general somatic afferent and general visceral afferent). The axons of the neurons which innervate the taste buds of the epiglottis synapse in the rostral portion of the solitary nucleus (gustatory nucleus). The axons of the neurons which provide general sensory information synapse in the spinal trigeminal nucleus.[1] The axons of the neurons which innervate the aortic bodies, aortic arch, respiratory and gastrointestinal tract, synapse in the caudal part of the solitary nucleus.

FunctionEdit

The neurons in the inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve innervate the taste buds on the epiglottis, the chemoreceptors of the aortic bodies and baroreceptors in the aortic arch. Most importantly, the majority of neurons in the inferior ganglion provide sensory innervation to the heart, respiratory and gastrointestinal tracts and other abdominal organs as the urinary bladder.

DevelopmentEdit

The neurons in the inferior ganglion of the vagus nerve are embryonically derived from epibranchial neurogenic placodes.

Clinical SignificanceEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b Rubin, Michael (2016-09-28). Netter's Concise Neuroanatomy. Safdieh, Joseph E.,, Netter, Frank H. (Frank Henry), 1906-1991 (Updated ed.). Philadelphia, PA. pp. 259–260. ISBN 9780323480918. OCLC 946698976.
  2. ^ Burt, Alvin M (1993). Textbook of Neuroanatomy (1st ed.). Philadelphia: W.B. Saunders. pp. 423–427. ISBN 0721621996. OCLC 24503849.