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The Independence Bowl is a post-season National Collegiate Athletic Association-sanctioned Division I college football bowl game that is played annually each December at Independence Stadium in Shreveport, Louisiana. The Independence Bowl was named because it was inaugurated in 1976, the year of the United States Bicentennial. Since 2017, the game has been sponsored by Walk-On's Bistreaux & Bar and officially known as the Walk-On's Independence Bowl. In 2013, the game was officially referred to as simply the AdvoCare V100 Bowl after then-title sponsor AdvoCare.

Independence Bowl
Walk-On's Independence Bowl
Walk–On's Bistreaux & Bar Independence Bowl logo.svg
StadiumIndependence Stadium
LocationShreveport, Louisiana
Operated1976–present
Conference tie-insSEC
ACC
Previous conference tie-insSouthland (1976–81)
SEC (1995–2009)
Big 12 (1998–2009)
MWC (2010–11)
PayoutUS$1,200,000 (as of 2015)[1]
Sponsors
Poulan (1990–97)
Sanford (1998–2000)
Mainstay Suites (2001–03)
PetroSun (2006–08)
AdvoCare (2009–13)
Duck Commander (2014)
Camping World (2015–16)
Walk-On's (2017–present)
Former names
Independence Bowl (1976–89)
Poulan Independence (1990)
Poulan/Weed Eater Independence Bowl (1991–97)
Sanford Independence Bowl (1998–2000)
MainStay Independence Bowl (2001–03)
Independence Bowl (2004–05)
PetroSun Independence Bowl (2006–08)
AdvoCare V100 Independence Bowl (2008–12)
AdvoCare V100 Bowl (2013)
Duck Commander Independence Bowl (2014)
Camping World Independence Bowl (2015–16)
2017 matchup
Florida State vs. Southern Miss (Florida State 42–13)
2018 matchup
Duke vs. Temple (Duke 56–27)

Contents

Conference tie-insEdit

For its first five years, the game pitted the champion of the Southland Conference against an at-large opponent.[2] It then moved to inviting two at-large teams, until 1995 when it began featuring a Southeastern Conference school against an at-large opponent.

From 1998 to 2009, the game normally featured a matchup between teams representing the Big 12 Conference and the SEC. Teams from other conferences were included only if one of those leagues did not have enough bowl-eligible teams to fill its spot, such as in 2004 when Miami (Ohio) played instead of an SEC squad. In 2008, neither the SEC nor the Big 12 had enough bowl-eligible teams to fill their respective spots resulting in a matchup of Louisiana Tech and Northern Illinois.

From 2010–2011, the Independence Bowl held the third selection from the Mountain West Conference and the seventh selection from the Atlantic Coast Conference. It was announced that in 2012, the Mountain West Conference team would be replaced by the tenth selection from the Southeastern Conference.

Notable gamesEdit

One of the most memorable games in Independence Bowl history was the 2000 edition, the "snow bowl" game between Texas A&M and Mississippi State.[3] The game was originally publicized as a reunion game, since Mississippi State coach Jackie Sherrill had served as A&M's coach for seven seasons in the 1980s and led them to three conference titles.[4] However, the weather quickly dominated the storyline as a rare and significant snowstorm hit Shreveport. In the midst of the snow, Mississippi State rallied to an overtime win over A&M.

The bowl has intermittently hosted ranked teams; the first (and to date, only) matchup between ranked opponents (per the AP Poll) was the 1993 edition between No. 22 Virginia Tech and No. 21 Indiana. The highest ranked team to appear was No. 15 LSU in the 1997 edition.

The only tie game in Independence Bowl history was the 1990 edition, between Louisiana Tech and Maryland. The only overtime game has been the aforementioned 2000 edition, between Texas A&M and Mississippi State.

The 2015 edition set a college football bowl record with 76 points scored in one half, occurring in the first half between Tulsa and Virginia Tech.[5]

Title sponsorEdit

In 1990, the contest became one of the earliest college bowl games to use a title sponsor, becoming the Poulan Weed-Eater Independence Bowl. Poulan (then a division of AB Electrolux Home Products, now Husqvarna AB) sponsored the game until 1996. Newell Rubbermaid's Sanford brand of writing products took over sponsorship from 1998 until 2000, while MainStay Investments sponsored from 2001 to 2003. In January 2005, the Deja Vu chain of "gentlemen's clubs" offered to become the title sponsor. The offer was rejected.[citation needed]

The Independence Bowl's three-year search for a title sponsor ended on August 21, 2006 when PetroSun Inc., a Phoenix, Arizona-based company that provides services and products to suppliers of oil and gas, agreed to become the bowl's sponsor. The deal, changing the game's full name to the PetroSun Independence Bowl, was to have run through 2008 with an option for 2009; however the deal was discontinued prior to the 2008 game.

On May 21, 2009, AdvoCare became the fifth title sponsor since the bowl's inception. The bowl was then renamed the AdvoCare V100 Independence Bowl.[6] AdvoCare makes energy drinks and nutritional supplements sold through multilevel marketing. On February 28, 2013, AdvoCare and the Independence Bowl Foundation announced that the Independence Bowl name would be dropped, and the bowl would be known as the AdvoCare V100 Bowl for the 2013 game.[7] In August 2013, AdvoCare announced it would drop its sponsorship after the 2013 game.[8][9]

In February 2014 Duck Commander (a duck call and hunting apparel manufacturer founded by former Louisiana Tech quarterback Phil Robertson, made prominent by the reality series Duck Dynasty) announced that it would be the title sponsor for the 2014 bowl, which will be known as the Duck Commander Independence Bowl.[10] After a year, Duck Commander declined to renew sponsorship and in July 2015, Camping World was announced as the new title sponsor of the game.[11] On March 14, 2017, the Independence Bowl Foundation unveiled a new logo for the game which will be used until a new title sponsor is signed.[12]

On October 5, 2017, Walk-On's Bistreaux & Bar was named as the new title sponsor of the game.[13]

Independence StadiumEdit

Independence Stadium is a stadium owned by the city of Shreveport, Louisiana. It used to be known as "State Fair Stadium"; it is the site of the annual Independence Bowl post-season college football game, initially (1976) the Bicentennial Bowl. Before that, it was the home venue of the Shreveport Steamer of the short-lived World Football League (1974–75). It also served as a neutral site for the annual Arkansas–LSU football rivalry from 1925–1936. The stadium is also host to numerous high school football games and soccer matches, since many schools in Shreveport lack an on-campus facility. Independence Stadium also hosted the Louisiana High School Athletic Association state football championship games in 2005 after the Louisiana Superdome suffered heavy damage from Hurricane Katrina. In 1994–95, Independence Stadium was home to the Shreveport Pirates of the Canadian Football League, which was undergoing US expansion at the time. In the late 1990s, the stadium capacity was expanded from approximately 40,000 to 50,832. In 2005, to meet accommodations of the upcoming Independence Bowl in 2006, the stadium went through a renovation to extend the capacity from 52,000 to 59,000. Then in 2008, the City of Shreveport created an entire new section of the stadium. This portion would allow the stadium capacity to be expanded only if need be. This expanse put the total capacity at 63,000.[14] This was part of a grander upgrading plan that improved all aspects of the facility, from concourses to playing surface.

Independence Stadium was considered as a possible playing site for the New Orleans Saints during the 2005 National Football League season due to Hurricane Katrina, but Shreveport eventually lost out to the Alamodome in San Antonio, Texas, and Louisiana State University's Tiger Stadium in Baton Rouge. However, Independence Stadium eventually was chosen to host the Saints' first preseason home game for the 2006 season while the Louisiana Superdome prepared for its grand re-opening. Field Turf was installed on the stadium's playing surface in 2010. In 2010, a Texas UIL playoff game was played featuring Mesquite Horn HS and the technical host Longview. Longview won, 28–14. In 2011, Independence Stadium hosted the inaugural year of the annual Port City Classic, an NCAA college football competition between Louisiana Tech University of Ruston, Louisiana, and Grambling State University of Grambling, Louisiana. The south end zone of the stadium borders Interstate 20.

Game resultsEdit

Rankings are based on the AP Poll prior to the game being played.

Date Winning Team Losing Team Attendance Notes
December 13, 1976 McNeese State 20 Tulsa 16 19,164 notes
December 17, 1977 Louisiana Tech 24 Louisville 14 22,223 notes
December 16, 1978 East Carolina 35 Louisiana Tech 13 31,054 notes
December 15, 1979 Syracuse 31 McNeese State 7 27,234 notes
December 13, 1980 Southern Miss 16 McNeese State 14 42,600 notes
December 12, 1981 Texas A&M 33 Oklahoma State 16 48,600 notes
December 11, 1982 Wisconsin 14 Kansas State 3 46,244 notes
December 10, 1983 No. 16 Air Force 9 Ole Miss 3 41,274 notes
December 15, 1984 Air Force 23 Virginia Tech 7 45,034 notes
December 21, 1985 Minnesota 20 Clemson 13 42,845 notes
December 20, 1986 Ole Miss 20 Texas Tech 17 46,369 notes
December 19, 1987 Washington 24 Tulane 12 44,683 notes
December 23, 1988 Southern Miss 38 UTEP 18 20,242 notes
December 16, 1989 Oregon 27 Tulsa 24 44,621 notes
December 15, 1990 Louisiana Tech 34 Maryland 34 48,325 notes
December 29, 1991 No. 24 Georgia 24 Arkansas 15 46,932 notes
December 31, 1992 Wake Forest 39 Oregon 35 31,337 notes
December 31, 1993 No. 22 Virginia Tech 45 No. 21 Indiana 20 33,819 notes
December 28, 1994 No. 18 Virginia 20 TCU 10 36,192 notes
December 29, 1995 LSU 45 Michigan State 26 48,835 notes
December 31, 1996 Auburn 32 No. 24 Army 29 41,366 notes
December 28, 1997 No. 15 LSU 27 Notre Dame 9 50,459 notes
December 31, 1998 Ole Miss 35 Texas Tech 18 46,862 notes
December 31, 1999 Ole Miss 27 Oklahoma 25 49,873 notes
December 31, 2000 Mississippi State 43 Texas A&M 41 (OT) 36,974 notes
December 27, 2001 Alabama 14 Iowa State 13 45,627 notes
December 27, 2002 Ole Miss 27 Nebraska 23 46,096 notes
December 31, 2003 Arkansas 27 Missouri 14 49,625 notes
December 28, 2004 Iowa State 17 Miami (Ohio) 13 43,076 notes
December 30, 2005 Missouri 38 South Carolina 31 41,332 notes
December 28, 2006 Oklahoma State 34 Alabama 31 45,054 notes
December 30, 2007 Alabama 30 Colorado 24 47,043 notes
December 28, 2008 Louisiana Tech 17 Northern Illinois 10 41,567 notes
December 28, 2009 Georgia 44 Texas A&M 20 49,654 notes
December 27, 2010 Air Force 14 Georgia Tech 7 39,632 notes
December 26, 2011 Missouri 41 North Carolina 24 41,728 notes
December 28, 2012 Ohio 45 Louisiana–Monroe 14 41,853 notes
December 31, 2013 Arizona 42 Boston College 19 36,917 notes
December 27, 2014 South Carolina 24 Miami (FL) 21 38,242 notes
December 26, 2015 Virginia Tech 55 Tulsa 52 31,289 notes
December 26, 2016 NC State 41 Vanderbilt 17 28,995 notes
December 27, 2017 Florida State 42 Southern Miss 13 33,601 notes
December 27, 2018 Duke 56 Temple 27 27,492 notes

MVPsEdit

The bowl names both an offensive and defensive player of the game; on several occasions, the award has been shared.

Year Offensive MVP Defensive MVP
Player Team Position Player Team Position
1976 Terry McFarland McNeese State QB Terry Clark Tulsa CB
1977 Keith Thibodeaux Louisiana Tech QB Otis Wilson Louisville LB
1978 Theodore Sutton East Carolina FB Zack Valentine East Carolina DE
1979 Joe Morris Syracuse RB Clay Carroll McNeese State DT
1980 Will Varner McNeese State QB Jearld Baylis Southern Miss NG
1981 Gary Kubiak Texas A&M QB Mike Green Oklahoma State LB
1982 Randy Wright Wisconsin QB Tim Krumrie Wisconsin NG
1983 Marty Louthan Air Force QB Andre Townsend Ole Miss DT
1984 Bart Weiss Air Force QB Scott Thomas Air Force S
1985 Rickey Foggie Minnesota QB Bruce Holmes Minnesota LB
1986 Mark Young Ole Miss QB James Mosley Texas Tech DE
1987 Chris Chandler Washington QB David Rill Washington LB
1988 James Henry Southern Miss PR James Henry Southern Miss CB
1989 Bill Musgrave Oregon QB Chris Oldham Oregon DB
1990 Mike Richardson Louisiana Tech RB Lorenza Baker Louisiana Tech LB
1991 Andre Hastings Georgia FL Torray Evans Georgia LB
1992 Todd Dixon Wake Forest SE Herman O'Berry Oregon CB
1993 Maurice DeShazo Virginia Tech QB Antonio Banks Virginia Tech CB
1994 Mike Groh Virginia QB Mike Frederick Virginia DE
1995 Kevin Faulk LSU RB Gabe Northern LSU DE
1996 Dameyune Craig Auburn QB Takeo Spikes
Rickey Neal
Auburn LB
LB
1997 Rondell Mealey LSU RB Arnold Miller LSU DE
1998 Romaro Miller Ole Miss QB Kendrick Clancy Ole Miss DL
1999 Tim Strickland Ole Miss CB Josh Heupel Oklahoma QB
2000 Ja'Mar Toombs Texas A&M RB Willie Blade Mississippi State DT
2001 Seneca Wallace Iowa State QB Matt Word
Waine Bacon
Iowa State
LB
S
2002 Eli Manning Ole Miss QB Chris Kelsay Nebraska DE
2003 Cedric Cobbs Arkansas RB Caleb Miller Arkansas LB
2004 Bret Meyer Iowa State QB Nick Moser Iowa State DB
2005 Brad Smith Missouri QB Marcus King Missouri CB
2006 Dantrell Savage Oklahoma State RB Jeremy Nethon Oklahoma State LB
2007 John Parker Wilson Alabama QB Wallace Gilberry Alabama DE
2008 Phillip Livas Louisiana Tech WR Weldon Brown Louisiana Tech CB
2009 Aron White Georgia TE Geno Atkins Georgia DL
2010 Jared Tew Air Force RB Rick Ricketts Air Force DT
2011 James Franklin Missouri QB Andrew Wilson Missouri LB
2012 Tyler Tettleton
Beau Blankenship
Ohio QB
RB
Keith Moore Ohio LB
2013 BJ Denker Arizona QB William Parks Arizona S
2014 Pharoh Cooper South Carolina WR Skai Moore South Carolina LB
2015 Isaiah Ford Virginia Tech WR Jeremy Brady Tulsa S
2016 Jaylen Samuels NC State FB Airius Moore NC State LB
2017 James Blackman Florida State QB Nate Andrews Florida State DB
2018 Daniel Jones Duke QB Delvon Randall Temple DB

Source: [15]

Most appearancesEdit

Every current member of the SEC except Tennessee, Florida and Kentucky has appeared in the game. Of the 14 current or former members of the Big 12, only Kansas, Texas, Baylor and West Virginia have yet to appear in the game. With the appearance of Duke in the 2018 game, every current or former member of the ACC except Pittsburgh has appeared.

Updated through the December 2018 edition (43 games, 86 total appearances).

Teams with multiple appearances
Rank Team Appearances Record Win pct.
1 Ole Miss 5 4–1 .800
2 Louisiana Tech 4 2–1–1 .625
T3 Air Force 3 3–0 1.000
T3 Alabama 3 2–1 .667
T3 Missouri 3 2–1 .667
T3 Southern Miss 3 2–1 .667
T3 Virginia Tech 3 2–1 .667
T3 McNeese State 3 1–2 .333
T3 Texas A&M 3 1–2 .333
T3 Tulsa 3 0–3 .000
T11 Georgia 2 2–0 1.000
T11 LSU 2 2–0 1.000
T11 Arkansas 2 1–1 .500
T11 Iowa State 2 1–1 .500
T11 Oklahoma State 2 1–1 .500
T11 Oregon 2 1–1 .500
T11 South Carolina 2 1–1 .500
T11 Texas Tech 2 0–2 .000
Teams with a single appearance

Won (13): Arizona, Auburn, Duke, East Carolina, Florida State, Minnesota, Mississippi State, NC State, Ohio, Syracuse, Wake Forest, Washington, Wisconsin
Lost (23): Army, Boston College, Clemson, Colorado, Georgia Tech, Indiana, Kansas State, Louisiana–Monroe, Louisville, Miami (FL), Miami (OH), Michigan State, Nebraska, North Carolina, Northern Illinois, Notre Dame, Oklahoma, TCU, Temple, Tulane, UTEP, Vanderbilt, Virginia
Tied: Maryland

Appearances by conferenceEdit

Updated through the December 2018 edition (43 games, 86 total appearances).

Rank Conference Appearances Wins Losses Ties Win pct.
1 SEC 18 14 4 0 .778
T2 ACC 12 6 5 1 .542
T2 Big 12 12 4 8 0 .333
4 Independents 11 4 6 1 .409
5 Southland 5 2 3 0 .400
T6 Pac-12[n 1] 4 3 1 0 .750
T6 WAC 4 3 1 0 .750
T6 Big Ten 4 2 2 0 .500
T6 SWC 4 1 3 0 .250
T10 The American[n 2] 3 1 2 0 .333
T10 MAC 3 1 2 0 .333
12 Big Eight 2 0 2 0 .000
T13 Mountain West 1 1 0 0 1.000
T13 C-USA 1 0 1 0 .000
T13 Missouri Valley 1 0 1 0 .000
T13 Sun Belt 1 0 1 0 .000
  1. ^ Record includes appearances from when the conference was the Pac-10.
  2. ^ Following the 2013 split of the original Big East along football lines, the FBS schools reorganized as the American Athletic Conference, which retains the charter of the original Big East. Virginia Tech (1993) appeared as a member of the Big East.

Game recordsEdit

Team Record, Team vs. Opponent Year
Most points (one team) 56, Duke vs. Temple 2018
Most points (both teams) 107, Virginia (55) vs. Tulsa (52) 2015
Most points (losing team) 52, Tulsa vs. Virginia Tech 2015
Fewest points allowed 3, Wisconsin vs. Kansas State
3, Air Force vs. Ole Miss
1982
1983
Margin of victory 31, Ohio vs. Louisiana–Monroe 2012
First downs 30, Virginia Tech vs. Tulsa 2015
Rushing yards 337, Missouri vs. North Carolina 2011
Passing yards 440, Duke vs. Temple 2018
Total yards 598, Virginia Tech vs. Tulsa 2015
Individual Record, Player, Team vs. Opponent Year
Most Points 24, Beau Blankenship, Ohio vs. Louisiana–Monroe 2012
Most Net Yards (Rush) 234, Kevin Faulk, LSU vs. Michigan State 1995
Most Yards Per Carry 9.4, Kevin Faulk, LSU vs. Michigan State 1995
Most Rushing Yds. by a QB 150, Brad Smith, Missouri vs. South Carolina 2005
Most Rushing Attempts 35, Ja'Mar Toombs, Texas A&M vs. Mississippi State 2000
Most Passing Yards 423, Daniel Jones, Duke vs. Temple 2018
Most Passing Touchdowns 5, Daniel Jones, Duke vs. Temple[16] 2018
Most Receptions 12, shared by:
Sidney Rice, South Carolina vs. Missouri
Isaiah Ford, Virginia Tech vs. Tulsa
T. J. Rahming, Duke vs. Temple[17]
 
2005
2015
2018
Longest Field Goal 52, Tommy Openshaw, Vanderbilt vs. NC State 2016

Source: [18]

Media coverageEdit

The bowl was televised by Mizlou for its first 13 editions, followed by ABC for two years (1990–91). Since 1992, the game has been televised on ESPN or ESPN2, except for 2014 when it was carried by ABC.

NotesEdit

  1. ^ http://www.statisticbrain.com/college-bowl-game-payouts/
  2. ^ "About the Southland". Retrieved January 12, 2012.
  3. ^ Farrell, Scott (January 1, 2001). "Bulldogs win Snow Bowl in wild overtime". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. p. 1. Retrieved December 22, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  4. ^ Vernellis, Brian (December 30, 2000). "Coaches' frayed relationship enhances game's allure". The Times. Shreveport, Louisiana. p. 7F. Retrieved December 22, 2018 – via newspapers.com.
  5. ^ [1], Saturday Down South, December 27, 2015. Retrieved July 8, 2016.
  6. ^ "Sponsorships". Retrieved December 23, 2015.
  7. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on March 20, 2013. Retrieved March 2, 2013.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  8. ^ Goins, Adria (August 21, 2013). "Longtime bowl expected to lose Advocare sponsorship". KSLA 12. Retrieved November 6, 2013.
  9. ^ Dee, Chris (August 21, 2013). "Advocare No Longer Title Sponsor For Annual Bowl Game". 1130am (Radio). Retrieved November 6, 2013.
  10. ^ Huston, Chris (February 23, 2014). "Report: Duck Commander is new sponsor for Independence Bowl". NBC Sports. Retrieved February 23, 2014.
  11. ^ "Camping World Announced as Title Sponsor of the Independence Bowl". Retrieved July 16, 2015.
  12. ^ "Independence Bowl Foundation Unveils New Logo; Kid Combine Event". Retrieved March 14, 2017.
  13. ^ "Walk-On's Announced as Title Sponsor of the Independence Bowl". Retrieved October 5, 2017.
  14. ^ "World Stadiums – Stadiums in the United States :: Louisiana". Retrieved December 23, 2015.
  15. ^ "Independence Bowl Media Guide" (PDF). 2018. p. 44. Retrieved December 27, 2018.
  16. ^ @IndyBowl (December 27, 2018). "Jones is all alone now. His fifth TD pass is a new I-Bowl record" (Tweet). Retrieved December 27, 2018 – via Twitter.
  17. ^ @IndyBowl (December 27, 2018). "Another record -- well a tied record" (Tweet). Retrieved December 27, 2018 – via Twitter.
  18. ^ http://independencebowl.org/about-us/bowl-records/

External linksEdit