I Adore You (film)

I Adore You is a 1933 British musical comedy film set in a movie studio. It was most notable for Errol Flynn appearing as an extra.[4]

I Adore You
Directed byGeorge King
Written byPaul England
Based onoriginal story by W. Scott Darling
Produced byIrving Asher
StarringMargot Grahame
Harold French
Clifford Heatherley
O. B. Clarence
Peggy Novak[1]
Music byCarroll Gibbons[2]
Production
company
Warner Bros-Teddington[3]
Distributed byWarner Bros
Release date
  • 1933 (1933)
CountryUnited Kingdom
LanguageEnglish

Margot Grahame was the heroine and Clifford Heatherley plays a film magnate.[5]

The choreography was done by Ralph Reader, a protege of Busby Berkeley.[6]

It is considered a lost film.[7]

PlotEdit

Norman Young (Harold French) wants to marry Margot Grahame (Margot Grahame) but her contract with a producer prohibits her from marrying during a five-year period. Norman spends millions to take over the contact.[8]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "HOLIDAY ATTRACTIONS AT THE PIER". The South Coast Bulletin. Southport, Qld.: National Library of Australia. 29 March 1934. p. 1. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  2. ^ "ROXY THEATRE". Townsville Daily Bulletin. Qld.: National Library of Australia. 18 August 1934. p. 3. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  3. ^ "NEW MUSICAL FILM". The Mirror. Perth: National Library of Australia. 30 June 1934. p. 10. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  4. ^ "FILM INDUSTRY". The West Australian. Perth: National Library of Australia. 15 February 1934. p. 14. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  5. ^ "The Capitol ANOTHER ARLISS SUCCESS". The Argus. Melbourne: National Library of Australia. 18 June 1934. p. 5. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  6. ^ "A New British Musical With Unique Background". The Times and Northern Advertiser. Peterborough, South Australia: National Library of Australia. 18 October 1935. p. 3. Retrieved 30 January 2015.
  7. ^ Matzen, Robert; Mazzone, Michael (15 May 2015). Errol Flynn Slept Here: The Flynns, the Hamblens, Rick Nelson, and the Most Notorious House in Hollywood. Paladin Communications. ISBN 9780988502581. Retrieved 28 November 2021.
  8. ^ "STAGE SCREEN and ART". The Australasian. Melbourne: National Library of Australia. 23 June 1934. p. 16. Retrieved 30 January 2015.

External linksEdit