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Hugo E. Rogers (November 26, 1899 – December 14, 1974) was a New York politician who served as the 16th Borough President of Manhattan from 1946 to 1949[3] and was a leader of Tammany Hall.

Hugo Rogers
16th Borough President of Manhattan
In office
January 1, 1946 – December 31, 1949
Preceded byEdgar J. Nathan
Succeeded byRobert F. Wagner Jr.
Personal details
Born
Hugo E. Rogers

November 26, 1899 (1899-11-26)
The Bronx, New York City
DiedDecember 14, 1974(1974-12-14) (aged 75)
Political partyDemocratic
Spouse(s)Adele[1]
Alma materNew York University School of Engineering
New York Law School

Contents

Early life and careerEdit

Rogers was born in New York in 1899 and attended Stuyvesant High School. He went on to graduate from the New York University School of Engineering and the New York Law School.[4] Rogers served in the infantry in World War I, and was honorably discharged as a sergeant.

Rogers served as a counsel to the Democratic organization in New York's 17th congressional district, located in Harlem, and as counsel and secretary to the Democratic majority leader of the New York State Assembly in 1935. He also served for 14 years on the Tammany Hall law committee.[3]

He enlisted again in 1942 and rose from a second lieutenant[4] to a major, serving at the New York Point of Embarkation.[1]

Borough PresidentEdit

As a candidate, Rogers was an officer in uniform and could therefore not participate in political campaigns or give speeches. Instead, his speeches were made for him by other supporters.[4]

In 1948, against the wishes of New York mayor William O'Dwyer, Rogers was named leader of the Tammany Hall organization, replacing O'Dwyer ally Frank J. Sampson.[2] In 1949, however, he was pushed out of the position by the mayor and replaced by Carmine G. DeSapio. Rogers was then pressured out of running for reelection, although he argued that his departure from the race was only in the interest of party unity.[5]

Later lifeEdit

Rogers died on December 14, 1974 of a heart attack at Polyclinic Hospital.[3]

Honors and awardsEdit

In 1948, Rogers received the Legion of Merit, presented to him by General Courtney Hodges at a ceremony at Fort Jay, on Governors Island.[1] In 1969 he was a winner of the New York University Alumni Meritorious Service Medal.[6]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Borough President of Manhattan Honored" (PDF). The New York Times. New York, NY. January 13, 1948. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
  2. ^ a b "O'Dwyer Gets Party Rebuff". The Milwaukee Journal. New York, NY. Associated Press. July 12, 1948. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
  3. ^ a b c "Hugo Rogers, 75, Tammany Leader" (PDF). The New York Times. New York, New York. December 16, 1949. Retrieved October 25, 2011.
  4. ^ a b c "New Borough Head served in 2 wars" (PDF). The New York Times. New York, NY. November 7, 1945. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
  5. ^ Hagerty, James G. (July 23, 1949). "Rogers quits race for Borough Head; only pawn, he says" (PDF). The New York Times. New York, NY. Retrieved October 26, 2011.
  6. ^ "5 N.Y.U. Alumni Honored For Meritorious Service" (PDF). The New York Times. New York, NY. May 11, 1969. Retrieved October 26, 2011.