Hugh Latimer (actor)

Hugh Alexander Forbes Latimer (born Haslemere, Surrey 12 May 1913 - died London 12 June 2006) was an English actor and toy maker.[1][2]

Hugh Latimer
Actor Hugh Latimer.jpg
1949 still
Born(1913-05-12)12 May 1913
Died12 June 2006(2006-06-12) (aged 93)
London, England
OccupationActor & Toy maker

He was educated at Oundle and Caius College, Cambridge, where he joined Footlights. He briefly attended the Central School of Speech and Drama, before appearing in "White Cargo" at the Brixton Theatre in 1936.[3] Noted for his skill in light comedy, Latimer made his West End debut in Pride and Prejudice in 1937.[4][5]

After being called up in 1940, he was commissioned to the 34th Light AA Regiment and saw active service in the Middle East and India between 1941 and 1945.[4]

He was married to Sheila Gairns. The couple had two daughters.[3]

FilmographyEdit

Year Title Role Notes
1948 Corridor of Mirrors Bing
1949 The Adventures of PC 49 P.C. Archibald Berkeley-Willoughby
1950 Someone at the Door Bill Reid
1952 Ghost Ship Peter
1953 Counterspy Inspector Barlow
1954 Stryker of the Yard
1954 The Million Pound Note Bumbles Hotel Receptionist Uncredited
1955 Tim Driscoll's Donkey Mr. Marshall
1956 The Narrowing Circle Charles Pears
1956 The Last Man to Hang? The Story: Mark
1957 Rogue's Yarn Sergeant Adams
1958 The Strange World of Planet X Jimmy Murray
1958 Up the Creek Lt Commander
1958 Sink the Bismarck! Commander - War Room Uncredited
1960 The Gentle Trap Vic Carter
1963 Girl in the Headlines Man in Club
1964 Night Train to Paris Jules Lemoine
1966 Ambush at Devil's Gap Laker
1969 School for Sex Berridge
1970 Jane Eyre Colonel Dent TV movie
1973 John Keats: His Life and Death Second Critic

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Hugh Latimer".
  2. ^ "Hugh Latimer".
  3. ^ a b "Hugh Latimer". 23 June 2006 – via www.telegraph.co.uk.
  4. ^ a b III, Harris M. Lentz (24 April 2007). "Obituaries in the Performing Arts, 2006: Film, Television, Radio, Theatre, Dance, Music, Cartoons and Pop Culture". McFarland – via Google Books.
  5. ^ "Hugh Latimer". www.bafta.org.

External linksEdit