Howgrave

Howgrave is a civil parish in the Hambleton District of North Yorkshire, England. It is a very small parish, with an area of only 323 acres (131 ha) and an estimated population in 2014 of only 10.[1] There is no modern village in the parish. The site of the deserted medieval village of Howgrave lies in the west of the parish, 0.3 miles (0.5 km) west of the village of Sutton Howgrave.[2]

Howgrave
Medieval village site, Howgrave (geograph 1850060).jpg
All that remains are humps and bumps in this field
Howgrave is located in North Yorkshire
Howgrave
Howgrave
Location within North Yorkshire
Population10 
OS grid referenceSE319800
Civil parish
  • Howgrave
District
Shire county
Region
CountryEngland
Sovereign stateUnited Kingdom
Post townBEDALE
Postcode districtDL8
PoliceNorth Yorkshire
FireNorth Yorkshire
AmbulanceYorkshire
List of places
UK
England
Yorkshire
54°13′00″N 1°30′45″W / 54.2167°N 1.5125°W / 54.2167; -1.5125Coordinates: 54°13′00″N 1°30′45″W / 54.2167°N 1.5125°W / 54.2167; -1.5125

Despite its small size Howgrave has a complicated geography and history. Today Howgrave is divided between two civil parishes, Howgrave itself and Sutton with Howgrave, which, despite its name, includes only part of Howgrave. Until the 19th century both parishes were townships in the ancient parish of Kirklington in the North Riding of Yorkshire,[3] but small parts of Howgrave were detached parts of two other townships and parishes. A farm and a house were detached parts of the township of Nunwick cum Howgrave in the parish of Ripon, and another house was a detached part of the township of Holme cum Howgrave in the parish of Pickhill.[4]

The toponym is derived from the Old English hol grāf, meaning "grove in the hollow".[5] Howgrave was mentioned in the Domesday Book (as Hograve), when different carucates were held by three different owners, the Earl of Richmond, the Archbishop of York and the Bishop of Durham.[6] It was considered a separate manor of Kirklington in the 16th century,[6] but by 1640 it was recorded that there were no inhabitants in the township.[2] Howgrave became a separate civil parish in 1866.[7] The detached parts of Nunwick cum Howgrave, a total of 118 acres (48 ha),[8] became detached parts of the new civil parish of Nunwick cum Howgrave.[9] In the late 19th century 33 acres (13 ha) of the detached parts of Nunwick cum Howgrave were transferred to the civil parish of Howgrave,[10] and 85 acres (34 ha) of Nunwick cum Howgrave were transferred to the civil parish of Sutton Howgrave.[11]

In 1974 Howgrave was transferred to Hambleton district in the new county of North Yorkshire. Since 1978 it has shared a grouped parish council, Kirklington with Sutton Howgrave, with the parishes of Kirklington-cum-Upsland and Sutton with Howgrave.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Population Estimates" (PDF). North Yorkshire County Council. 2015. Retrieved 30 October 2017. The 2011 census population figure of 315 also includes the parishes of Kirklington-cum-Upsland and Sutton with Howgrave."Population 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 1 August 2015.
  2. ^ a b Historic England. "Howgrave deserted medieval village (1019382)". National Heritage List for England. Retrieved 25 June 2013.
  3. ^ GENUKI. Kirklington: Geographical and Historical information from the year 1890.
  4. ^ GENUKI: Places in the parish of Kirklington in 1822
  5. ^ Watts, Victor, ed. (2010), "Howgrave", The Cambridge Dictionary of English Place-Names, Cambridge University Press, ISBN 978 0 521 16855 7
  6. ^ a b Page, William, ed. (1914). "Parishes: Kirklington". Victoria County History: A History of the County of York North Riding: Volume 1. Institute of Historical Research. Retrieved 24 June 2013.
  7. ^ Vision of Britain: Howgrave CP
  8. ^ See parish areas in 1891 and 1901 in Vision of Britain: Nunwick cum Howgrave census reports
  9. ^ Vision of Britain: Nunwick cum Howgrave boundary map
  10. ^ See parish areas in 1891 and 1901 in Vision of Britain: Howgrave census reports
  11. ^ See parish areas in 1891 and 1901 in Vision of Britain: Sutton Howgrave census reports