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Balliol arms: Gules an orle argent

The House of Balliol (de Bailleul) was a noble family originating from the village of Bailleul in Picardy. They held estates in England, granted during the reign of King William Rufus. Through marriage, they had claims to the Throne of Scotland. One member of the family, John Balliol, was named King of Scotland after the disputed succession following extinction of the Dunkeld line. John was deposed, leading to the First War of Scottish Independence. His son, Edward Balliol, also briefly controlled the Scottish throne during the Second War of Scottish Independence. Edward had no issue, and the direct line went extinct with him.

List of heads of the Balliol estatesEdit

Both Balliols had English support for their claims; both were deposed. Edward died without issue, but the Balliol descent continued through his cousin Christine de Lindsay (granddaughter of John II), who married Enguerrand V, Lord of Coucy, to the lords of Coucy and ultimately the Bourbon kings of France and Spain.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Stell, G. P., "Balliol, Bernard de (d. 1154x62)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 , accessed 24 Jan 2008
  • Stell, G. P., "Balliol, Bernard de (d. c.1190)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 , accessed 24 Jan 2008
  • Stell, G. P., "Balliol , John de (b. before 1208, d. 1268)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004 , accessed 24 Jan 2008
House of Balliol
Preceded by
House of Dunkeld
Ruling House of the Kingdom of Scotland
1292 – 1296
Pretender 1332 – 1338
Succeeded by
House of Bruce