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There are many species in the plant genus Cynoglossum (/ˌsɪnˈɡlɒsəm, ˌs-, -nə-/[1][2]). They are coarse-appearing, small-flowered plants of the family Boraginaceae. Cynoglossum officinale, the common hound's-tongue, is a native of Asia, Africa, and Europe. It has been introduced into North America, and it is considered to be a troublesome weed because its burs stick to the wool of sheep and to other animals. Ingestion of this plant can also lead to photosensitivity in grazing animals.

Cynoglossum
CynoglossumOfficinale-bloem-kl.jpg
Cynoglossum officinale
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Boraginales
Family: Boraginaceae
Subfamily: Boraginoideae
Genus: Cynoglossum
L.
Type species
Cynoglossum officinale
L.
Species

See text.

Cynoglossum virginianum, known as wild comfrey, is a common plant from New York to Florida. Cynoglossum boreale occurs in the northern United States as far west as Minnesota and in Canada.

Cynoglossum amabile, known as Chinese Forget-me-not and Chinese hound's tongue, originally a wildflower from Southwest China, is now found in Europe and North America.

Cynoglossom grande is native to California.

In Iran there are 3 species of this plant from which Cynoglossum tehranicum is only found in Iran.[3]

Selected speciesEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Sunset Western Garden Book, 1995:606–607
  2. ^ "Pronunciation Guide for Plants". Retrieved 2016-01-23.
  3. ^ a b Mozaffarian, V. 1996. A dictionary of Iranian plant names: Latin, English, Persian. Tehran: Farhang-e Moʻaser.
  4. ^ "Cynoglossum". Australian Plant Name Index (APNI), IBIS database. Centre for Plant Biodiversity Research, Australian Government, Canberra. Retrieved 2008-11-26.

External linksEdit