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Hot Cross Buns is an English language nursery rhyme, Easter song, and street cry referring to the spiced English bun known as a hot cross bun, which is associated with the end of Lent and is eaten on Good Friday in various countries. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 13029.

The most common modern version is:[1]

Hot cross buns!
Hot cross buns!
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns!

If you have no daughters,
give them to your sons.
One a penny, two a penny,
Hot cross buns!

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g4 d g2   g4 d g2   d'8 c b a g a b c   d4 d, g2   b8 b b b b4 a4 g8 a b c a2 d8 c b a g a b c d4 d, g2 \bar "|." } 
\addlyrics { Hot cross buns! Hot cross buns! One a pen -- ny, two a pen -- ny, Hot cross buns! If you have no daugh -- ters, give them to your sons. One a pen -- ny, two a pen -- ny, Hot cross buns! }

OriginsEdit

The earliest record of the rhyme is in Christmas Box, published in London in 1798.[1] However, there are earlier references to the rhyme as a street cry in London, for example in the Poor Robin's Almanack for 1733, which noted:

Good Friday comes this month, the old woman runs
With one or two a penny hot cross buns.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b I. Opie and P. Opie, The Oxford Dictionary of Nursery Rhymes (Oxford University Press, 1951, 2nd edn., 1997), p. 197.
  2. ^ Charles Hindley, History of the Cries of London: Ancient and Modern (Cambridge University Press, 2011). p. 218.