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Hoover High School is a four-year public high school in the Birmingham, Alabama suburb of Hoover. Hoover replaced the former W.A. Berry High School. It is one of two high schools in the Hoover City School System and one of three International Baccalaureate schools in the Birmingham-Hoover Metropolitan Area. The school colors are orange, black, and white, and the athletic teams are called the Buccaneers. Hoover competes in AHSAA Class 7A athletics.[2]

Hoover High School
Hoover High School Facade.PNG
Address
1000 Buccaneer Drive

,
35244

Coordinates33°20′39″N 86°50′16″W / 33.34409°N 86.83765°W / 33.34409; -86.83765Coordinates: 33°20′39″N 86°50′16″W / 33.34409°N 86.83765°W / 33.34409; -86.83765
Information
TypePublic
Established1994
School districtHoover City Schools
PrincipalJohn Montgomery
Faculty222
Grades9-12
Enrollment2,922 (2016-17)[1]
Student to teacher ratio14:1
CampusSuburban
Color(s)Orange, Black, White             
AthleticsAHSAA Class 7A
NicknameBuccaneers
Website

Hoover is the largest high school in the state of Alabama, with an enrollment of 2,770 students.[3] It is known for being featured in 2006 in the MTV reality television series, Two-A-Days.

Contents

Student profileEdit

Enrollment in grades 9-12 for the 2013-14 school year is 2,770 students. Approximately 59% of students are white, 27% are African-American, 7% are Asian-American, 5% are Hispanic, and 2% are multiracial. Roughly 25% of students qualify for free or reduced price lunch.[4]

Hoover has a graduation rate of 94%.[5] Approximately 94% of its students meet or exceed proficiency standards in reading, and 96% meet or exceed standards in mathematics. The average ACT score for Hoover students is 26 and the average SAT composite is 1860.[6]

AthleticsEdit

Athletic teamsEdit

Hoover competes in AHSAA Class 7A athletics and fields teams in the following sports:[7]

  • Baseball
  • Basketball
  • Bowling
  • Cheerleading
  • Cross Country
  • Football
  • Golf
  • Indoor Track & Field
  • Outdoor Track & Field
  • Soccer
  • Softball
  • Swimming and Diving
  • Tennis
  • Volleyball
  • Wrestling

ChampionshipsEdit

Hoover has won a total of over 100 state championships in the following sports:

  • Baseball (1972, 1981, 2008, 2017)
  • Boys' basketball (2015)
  • Girls' basketball (2001, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2017)
  • Boys' cross country (1968, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1981, 1982, 1992, 1997, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2004, 2005, 2007)
  • Football (1977, 1982, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2009, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016, 2017)
  • Boys' golf (1999, 2000, 2001, 2003)
  • Girls' golf (1987, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2014, 2015)
  • Boys' indoor track and field (1998, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2013, 2014, 2017, 2018)
  • Girls' indoor track and field (1990, 2006, 2012, 2014, 2015)
  • Boys' soccer (2003)
  • Girls' soccer (1991, 1992, 1993)
  • Softball (1997, 1998, 2001, 2002, 2004)
  • Boys' swimming and diving (1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1997, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003)
  • Girls' swimming and diving (1969, 1970, 1994, 2010, 2011)
  • Boys' tennis (1999, 2001, 2006)
  • Boys' outdoor track and field (2005, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016)
  • Girls' outdoor track and field (2004, 2006, 2010, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017)
  • Wrestling (1972, 2003, 2005, 2006, 2010)

Hoover's football team has played in the state playoffs 30 times, reaching the semifinals 19 times and the finals 17 times.[8]

Performing artsEdit

ControversyEdit

Hoover High School became embroiled in controversy in the summer of 2007 over allegations that grades for certain athletes were changed to make them eligible for college sports under National Collegiate Athletic Association regulations. The charges center around players on the football team.[9] Rush Propst, the Bucs' head coach, denied any wrongdoing, as did then-principal Richard Bishop. Hoover Superintendent Andy Craig appointed retired federal prosecutor Sam Pointer to investigate the charges. The report was released on October 12, 2007, and found that grades had been changed for two athletes, along with various other issues. (The report can be seen on the school website.)

On July 25, 2007, the Hoover School Board voted to not renew Bishop's contract after one year of service. The action was based largely on a less-than-satisfactory performance assessment by a former assistant superintendent. Dr. Ken Jarnagin was named the interim principal; he started the previous month as the school system's chief academic officer.[10]

Hoover High School again came under public scrutiny in October 2007 after reports that a player failed to properly transfer from Hanceville High School. The AHSAA investigation resulted in the forfeiture of all games in which he played, reducing the team record from 6-1 to 2-5 at the time.[11][12] The Bucs still qualified for the post-season playoffs, however.

The state director of K-12 accreditation for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools announced his concern with the leadership at Hoover High. SACS asked for and received an outline of the changes necessary to fix the problems in order for the school to retain its accreditation.[13]

Notable alumniEdit

External linksEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Hoover High School". National Center for Education Statistics. Retrieved February 4, 2019.
  2. ^ "AHSAA School Classification 2014-16" (PDF).
  3. ^ "Alabama School Rankings". SchoolDigger. Retrieved October 8, 2015.
  4. ^ "Hoover High School". SchoolDigger. Retrieved October 8, 2015.
  5. ^ "How has your school's graduation rate changed since 2010?". AL.com. Retrieved October 29, 2015.
  6. ^ "Hoover High School on Niche".
  7. ^ "Hoover Bucs Athletics". Hoover Buccaneers - Hoover High School Sports. Retrieved October 8, 2015.
  8. ^ "Alabama High School Football History". www.ahsfhs.org. Retrieved October 8, 2015.
  9. ^ Stock, Erin (July 20, 2007). "Pointer outlines investigation of school athletics". The Birmingham News. Archived from the original on September 30, 2007.
  10. ^ Stock, Erin and Jon Solomon (July 25, 2007). "Hoover school board dismisses Hoover High principal". The Birmingham News (al.com).
  11. ^ Solomon, Jon; Erin Stock (October 24, 2007). "Hoover wins forfeited; heat on Propst grows". The Birmingham News (al.com).
  12. ^ Steinbauer, Peter (October 18, 2007). "AHSAA Probes Player's Status". The Birmingham News (al.com).
  13. ^ Stock, Erin (October 26, 2007). "SACS has concerns about Hoover High". The Birmingham News (al.com).