Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Sioux City, Iowa)

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church is located in Sioux City, Iowa, United States. Designed by architect William L. Steele, the church building has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1998.

Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church
Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Sioux City from NW 1.jpg
View from the northwest
Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Sioux City, Iowa) is located in Iowa
Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Sioux City, Iowa)
Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Sioux City, Iowa) is located in the United States
Holy Trinity Greek Orthodox Church (Sioux City, Iowa)
Location900 6th St.
Sioux City, Iowa
Coordinates42°29′46″N 96°23′55″W / 42.49611°N 96.39861°W / 42.49611; -96.39861Coordinates: 42°29′46″N 96°23′55″W / 42.49611°N 96.39861°W / 42.49611; -96.39861
Built1926
ArchitectWilliam L. Steele
Architectural styleLate 19th and 20th Century Revival
NRHP reference No.98000381[1]
Added to NRHPMay 1, 1998

HistoryEdit

Before the founding of Holy Trinity Church in 1918, Greek Orthodox Christians had to travel to Omaha, Nebraska to attend services. Paikos K. Pappaphilipopoulos, who would Americanize his name to Peter Nelson, led the organization of a church. Their initial meeting was held at a Knights of Columbus Hall. In 1920 they purchased property near the downtown area for $35,000.[2] There was a house on the property that was used as the parish's first church. Father Constantinos Harvelas served as the church's first pastor.

The cornerstone for the present church building was laid in the spring of 1925 and the church was dedicated on October 4 of the same year. It is the oldest and largest Orthodox Church building in Iowa.[2] In February 1996 a fire gutted the church's interior. Christ Kamages of San Francisco served as architect for the renovation, iconographer Elias Damianakis of Florida and woodcarver Steve Kavroulakis of Crete, designed and built a new altar, sanctuary, narthex, iconostasion, and iconography. Metropolitan Iakovos of Krinis rededicated the church in June 1999.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. July 9, 2010.
  2. ^ a b "Holy Trinity History". Holy Trinity Church. Archived from the original on 2010-07-18. Retrieved 2010-12-16.

External linksEdit