Hoe (; 膾/鱠 pronounced [hwe]) refers to several varieties of raw food dishes in Korean cuisine, consumed with local diversity by Koreans of all classes since the Three Kingdoms of Korea (57 BC - 668 AD), or earlier.

Hoe
Hoe (raw fish).jpg
Alternative namesHwe
TypeRaw fish
Place of originKorea
Associated national cuisineKorean cuisine
Variations
Korean name
Hangul
Hanja
;
Revised Romanizationhoe
McCune–Reischauerhoe
IPA[ɸwe̞]

VarietiesEdit

There are uncooked hoe () as well as blanched sukhoe (숙회).[1][2]

RawEdit

Hoe (), the raw fish or meat dish, can be divided into saengseon-hoe (생선회), filleted raw fish, and yukhoe (육회), sliced raw meat.[3][4] Saengseon-hoe (생선회) can be either hwareo-hoe (활어회) made from freshly killed fish, or seoneo-hoe (선어회) made using aged fish. Mulhoe (물회) is a cold raw fish soup.[5]

BlanchedEdit

Sukhoe (숙회) is a blanched fish, seafood, meat, or vegetable dish. Ganghoe (강회) is a dish of rolled and tied ribbons made with blanched vegetables such as water dropworts and scallions.[6]

PreparationEdit

Hwareo-hoe (활어회) is prepared by filleting freshly killed fish, while seoneo-hoe (선어회) is made with aged fish in a similar way as Japanese sashimi: removing the blood and innards and ageing the fish at a certain temperature before filleting.[7][8] Fish or seafood hoe is often served with gochujang-based dipping sauces, such as cho-gochujang (chili paste mixed with vinegar) and ssamjang (chili paste mixed with soybean paste). Hoe is often eaten wrapped in ssam (wrap) vegetables, such as lettuce and perilla leaves. After eating hoe at a restaurant, maeun-tang (spicy fish stew) made with the bones, head, and the remaining meat of the fish, can be served as an add-on dish.

HistoryEdit

 
Gangbyeon hoeeum (lit.'Eating hoe at riverside') drawn by Kim Deuk-sin (1754‒1822) depicts Korean people gathered to eat saengseon-hoe (raw fish dish) after fishing.

With the popularization of Buddhism in Korea, beginning in the middle of the Three Kingdoms period, and running late into the Goryeo Dynasty (918–1392), the consumption of fish and other meat products (including hoe) declined. As the influence of Buddhism waned in the late Goryeo Dynasty period, the consumption of hoe began to lose its stigma.

During the Joseon Dynasty, the state promoted Confucianism, and, as Confucius was known to have enjoyed eating raw meat, hoe consumption greatly increased.[9]

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "hoe" . Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  2. ^ "sukhoe" 숙회. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  3. ^ "saengseon-hoe" 생선회. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  4. ^ "yukhoe" 육회. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  5. ^ "mulhoe" 물회. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  6. ^ "ganghoe" 강회. Standard Korean Language Dictionary (in Korean). National Institute of Korean Language. Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  7. ^ 김, 경운 (26 October 2015). "[김경운 기자의 맛있는 스토리텔링 15] 선어회와 활어회". Seoul Shinmun (in Korean). Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  8. ^ 여성조선 (27 March 2017). "고기와 생선, 숙성의 맛". The Chosun Ilbo (in Korean). Retrieved 3 June 2017.
  9. ^ Kim Hak-min (김학민) (2003-07-16). 공자 사모님 힘드셨겠네 (in Korean). The Hankyoreh. Retrieved 2008-08-23.

External linksEdit