Hit Squad (film)

Hit Squad (Italian: Squadra antifurto) is a 1976 Italian "poliziottesco"-comedy film directed by Bruno Corbucci. It is the second chapter in the Nico Giraldi film series starred by Tomas Milian.[3][4]

Hit Squad
Squadra antifurto.jpg
Italian theatrical release poster
Directed byBruno Corbucci
Produced byGalliano Juso
Screenplay by
Story by
  • Mario Amendola
  • Bruno Corbucci[1]
Starring
Music byGuido & Maurizio De Angelis[1]
CinematographyMarcello Masciocchi[1]
Edited byDaniele Alabiso[1]
Production
company
Cinemaster
Distributed byTitanus
Release date
  • October 29, 1976 (1976-10-29) (Italy)
Running time
103 minutes[2]
CountryItaly[2]
Box office₤1.825 billion

PlotEdit

In the anti-theft team, Giraldi Marshal deals with criminals who commit thefts in apartments or steal cars. Among these is a band to which it belongs Blinds, a little thief inclined to confess things, Zagaja, a stutterer thief, and the Sicilians Rosario and Salvatore Trapani. Performed the theft in the villa of an American (former CIA), the thieves come into possession of documents about a system of bribes concerning some important personalities in the United States, the Deal Zebra Point.

Having become in contact with emissaries of the US Ralf Douglas Blinds requires a sum of money for the return of the booklet: is killed. The murder of Zagaja puts Giraldi Marshal in alarm, which senses that Douglas had been robbed of something important: to ascertain what are stalked the Trapanese brothers who have since been in touch with the Douglas emissaries. The attempt failed and the two thieves are killed, but an emissary of Douglas leaves a trace: thanks to that Giraldi flies to New York where, tracked down Douglas, has him arrested.

CastEdit

ReleaseEdit

Hit Squad was released on October 29, 1976 in Italy where it was distributed by Titanus.[2] The film grossed a total of 1,825,316,810 Italian lire on its theatrical release.[2]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e Curti 2013, p. 176.
  2. ^ a b c d Curti 2013, p. 177.
  3. ^ Roberto Curti. Italia odia: il cinema poliziesco italiano. Lindau, 2006.
  4. ^ Manlio Momarasca; Giorgio Navarro; Davide Pulici. Monnezza e i suoi fratelli. Nocturno Dossier n.39, Cinemabis Comm.

BibliographyEdit

  • Curti, Roberto (2013). Italian Crime Filmography, 1968-1980. McFarland. ISBN 0786469765.CS1 maint: ref=harv (link)

External linksEdit