Open main menu

Hillsboro is a city in Jefferson County, Missouri, United States. The population was 2,821 at the 2010 census. Hillsboro is the county seat of Jefferson County.[7]

Hillsboro, Missouri
Jefferson County Courthouse in Hillsboro
Jefferson County Courthouse in Hillsboro
Location of Hillsboro, Missouri
Location of Hillsboro, Missouri
Coordinates: 38°13′56″N 90°33′48″W / 38.23222°N 90.56333°W / 38.23222; -90.56333Coordinates: 38°13′56″N 90°33′48″W / 38.23222°N 90.56333°W / 38.23222; -90.56333
CountryUnited States
StateMissouri
CountyJefferson
Incorporated1839
Government
 • MayorJoe Phillips[1]
Area
 • Total3.65 sq mi (9.45 km2)
 • Land3.65 sq mi (9.45 km2)
 • Water0 sq mi (0 km2)
Elevation
802 ft (245 m)
Population
 • Total2,821
 • Estimate 
(2016)[4]
3,131
 • Density770/sq mi (300/km2)
Time zoneUTC-6 (Central (CST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC-5 (CDT)
ZIP code
63050
Area code(s)636
FIPS code29-32248[5]
GNIS feature ID0736306[6]
Websitehillsboromo.org

Contents

HistoryEdit

Hillsboro was originally called Monticello, and under the latter name was platted in 1839, and named after Monticello, home of President Thomas Jefferson.[8] The name Monticello was afterwards changed because the U.S. postal authorities refused to accept that name, there being another post office in the state with a similar name. The present name Hillsboro is the English equivalent of the Italian name Monticello.[9] A post office has been in operation at Hillsboro since 1838.[10]

The Thomas C. Fletcher House and Sandy Creek Covered Bridge are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[11]

Environmental IssuesEdit

The Doe Run Company, a subsidiary of the Renco Group has operated a lead smelter near they city since 1892. In 2001, the Missouri Department of Natural Resources found that street dust in the town of Herculaneum contained 30% lead.[12][13] Testing the same year by the United States Environmental Protection Agency found high levels of air pollution. Test results also showed elevated levels of lead among more than half of pre-school age children who were tested living near the smelter in Herculaneum.[14][15]

The Doe Run Company, which was a major component of Hillsboro's local economy, undertook a voluntary buyout of homes in the area[16] and over the next few years purchased approximately 160 homes.[17] In addition to the buyout, Doe Run invested $14 million in the removal of lead-contaminated soil. It replaced soil for more than 700 properties, including residences, schools, public parks, and other land.[18][14]

In December 2013, Doe Run closed the Herculaneum smelter,[19] though refining operations of specialty alloys continue.[20][21] The company allocated more than $8 million for cleanup of the property following its closure.[22] Between 2010 and 2015, Doe Run spent $289 million on environmental expenditures across its various holdings.[23] The funds have been used in part for remediating old mining sites and for the construction of water treatment plants to treat waste from mining operations.[24][25]

GeographyEdit

Hillsboro is located at 38°13′56″N 90°33′48″W / 38.23222°N 90.56333°W / 38.23222; -90.56333 (38.232346, -90.563233).[26] According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 3.65 square miles (9.45 km2), all land.[2]

DemographicsEdit

Census Pop.
1890264
1900254−3.8%
19102612.8%
1920205−21.5%
193023313.7%
19402569.9%
195039052.3%
196045717.2%
197083181.8%
19801,50881.5%
19901,6257.8%
20001,6753.1%
20102,82168.4%
Est. 20163,131[4]11.0%
U.S. Decennial Census[27]

2010 censusEdit

As of the census[3] of 2010, there were 2,821 people, 900 households, and 623 families residing in the city. The population density was 772.9 inhabitants per square mile (298.4/km2). There were 957 housing units at an average density of 262.2 per square mile (101.2/km2). The racial makeup of the city was 94.5% White, 2.8% African American, 0.4% Native American, 0.5% Asian, 0.5% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.0% of the population.

There were 900 households of which 44.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 48.3% were married couples living together, 15.9% had a female householder with no husband present, 5.0% had a male householder with no wife present, and 30.8% were non-families. 25.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.23.

The median age in the city was 29.2 years. 27.9% of residents were under the age of 18; 13.8% were between the ages of 18 and 24; 31.2% were from 25 to 44; 19% were from 45 to 64; and 8.2% were 65 years of age or older. The gender makeup of the city was 52.0% male and 48.0% female.

2000 censusEdit

As of the census[5] of 2000, there were 1,675 people, 581 households, and 395 families residing in the city. The population density was 701.4 inhabitants per square mile (270.6/km²). There were 620 housing units at an average density of 259.6 per square mile (100.2/km²). The racial makeup of the city was 95.46% White, 2.03% African American, 0.36% Native American, 0.66% Asian, 0.60% from other races, and 0.90% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.15% of the population.

There were 581 households out of which 35.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 47.7% were married couples living together, 16.5% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.0% were non-families. 26.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.09.

In the city, the population was spread out with 27.7% under the age of 18, 13.7% from 18 to 24, 30.8% from 25 to 44, 19.9% from 45 to 64, and 7.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 31 years. For every 100 females, there were 107.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 106.0 males.

The median income for a household in the city was $36,850, and the median income for a family was $44,000. Males had a median income of $30,880 versus $24,408 for females. The per capita income for the city was $15,585. About 9.7% of families and 14.3% of the population were below the poverty line, including 19.6% of those under age 18 and 9.4% of those age 65 or over.

EducationEdit

The main campus of Jefferson College is located in Hillsboro. Jefferson College is a two-year institution that serves the greater Jefferson County area.

Hillsboro R-3 School District is the local school district. The city has 1 high school, Hillsboro High School.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ City of Hillsboro.
  2. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files 2010". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on January 12, 2012. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  3. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2012-07-08.
  4. ^ a b "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". Retrieved June 9, 2017.
  5. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  6. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  7. ^ "Find a County". National Association of Counties. Archived from the original on May 31, 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-07.
  8. ^ "Jefferson County Place Names, 1928–1945 (archived)". The State Historical Society of Missouri. Archived from the original on 24 June 2016. Retrieved 19 October 2016.CS1 maint: BOT: original-url status unknown (link)
  9. ^ "Disappearing Missouri Names". The Kansas City Star. March 19, 1911. p. 15. Retrieved August 15, 2014 – via Newspapers.com.  
  10. ^ "Post Offices". Jim Forte Postal History. Retrieved 19 October 2016.
  11. ^ "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2010-07-09.
  12. ^ Fenston, Jacob (8 August 2012). "The end of a lead-laced era: polluting smelter to close after 120 years". KBIA. Archived from the original on 8 June 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. the dust from the streets in Herculaneum contained 300,000 parts per million lead. That's 30 percent.
  13. ^ Thorsen, Leah (15 December 2013). "Smelter's closure is end of an era in Herculaneum". St. Louis Post Dispatch. Archived from the original on 9 March 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. Testing on Herculaneum streets in 2001 found dangerously high levels of lead, up to 300,000 parts per million in places.
  14. ^ a b Salter, Jim (25 December 2013). "Small Missouri town to lose its historic lead smelter". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on 6 September 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017.
  15. ^ Fenston, Jacob (8 August 2012). "The end of a lead-laced era: polluting smelter to close after 120 years". KBIA. Archived from the original on 8 June 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. Within a quarter mile, 56 percent of kids had high levels of lead in their blood. At a half-mile, it was 52 percent.
  16. ^ Thorsen, Leah (15 December 2013). "Smelter's closure is end of an era in Herculaneum". St. Louis Post Dispatch. Archived from the original on 9 March 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. They moved to Festus in 2004 after selling their house to Doe Run through a voluntary buyout negotiated two years earlier by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources.
  17. ^ Fenston, Jacob (8 August 2012). "The end of a lead-laced era: polluting smelter to close after 120 years". KBIA. Archived from the original on 8 June 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. the company agreed to buy out the 160 homes closest to the smelter.
  18. ^ Thorsen, Leah (15 December 2013). "Smelter's closure is end of an era in Herculaneum". St. Louis Post Dispatch. Archived from the original on 9 March 2017. Retrieved 6 March 2017. The company has spent millions of dollars to clean up Herculaneum. It has replaced the soil in 781 yards at a cost of more than $14 million, and spends an additional $9 million a year to improve environmental performance.
  19. ^ Luecke, Jacob (16 June 2015). "Doe Run – the Lead Belt Heavyweight". Missouri Business. Archived from the original on 16 September 2017. Retrieved 10 March 2017. But in late 2013, Doe Run closed the Herculaneum smelter under an agreement with the Environmental Protection Agency. The EPA had targeted the smelter citing violations of the federal Clean Air and Clean Water acts.
  20. ^ "End near for Herculaneum smelter". Daily Journal Online. 20 December 2013. Archived from the original on 16 September 2017. Retrieved 10 March 2017. Following the closure of the smelter, 75 employees will be retained in 2014 to assist with continued refining and alloying, and the maintenance of the Herculaneum site.
  21. ^ Bruce, Tracey (12 March 2017). "Stack Stays". Leader Publications. Retrieved 13 March 2017. The Doe Run Co. plans this year to start demolishing the five main buildings that made up its Herculaneum smelting operation.
  22. ^ Salter, Jim (25 December 2013). "Small Missouri town to lose its historic lead smelter". The Seattle Times. Archived from the original on 6 September 2017. Retrieved 9 March 2017. After the smelter closes, the company has agreed to spend more than $8 million more for cleanup of the property.
  23. ^ Luecke, Jacob (16 June 2015). "Doe Run – the Lead Belt Heavyweight". Missouri Business. Archived from the original on 16 September 2017. Retrieved 10 March 2017. "Since 2010, we have spent $289 million on environmental expenditures," Pyatt says.
  24. ^ Luecke, Jacob (16 June 2015). "Doe Run – the Lead Belt Heavyweight". Missouri Business. Archived from the original on 16 September 2017. Retrieved 10 March 2017. Doe Run's environmental expenses include remediating old mining sites and treating the water it uses to comply with standards...
  25. ^ "Treating Missouri Waterways with Care". doerun.com. The Doe Run Company. 2015. Archived from the original on 22 July 2018. Retrieved 10 May 2017.
  26. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  27. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 26, 2015. Retrieved June 4, 2015.
  28. ^ Former Autovon Switching Centers.

External linksEdit