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Highway 2 (Hebrew: כביש 2, Kvish 2) is an Israeli highway located on the coastal plain of the Mediterranean Sea. It begins as a major arterial road within Tel Aviv, becoming a freeway as it exits the city northward continuing to Haifa. North of Tel Aviv, the highway is also called The Coastal Highway (Hebrew: כביש החוף‎, Kvish HaHof) or The New Haifa–Tel Aviv Highway (Hebrew: כביש חיפה - תל אביב החדש‎, Kvish Heifa–Tel Aviv HaHadash).

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Highway 2
  • The Coastal Highway כביש החוף
  • The New HaifaTel Aviv Highway כביש חיפה - תל אביב החדש
Route information
Length90 km (60 mi)
Major junctions
South endTel Aviv (Kibbutz Galuyot Interchange)
North endHaifa (Haifa South Interchange)
Location
Major citiesTel Aviv, Herzliya, Netanya, Hadera, Tirat Carmel, Haifa
Highway system
Roads in Israel

Highways

Highway 1Highway 3
Highway 2 nearby Netanya.

Highway 2 is one of the busiest highways in the country, and drivers experience frequent traffic congestion between Hadera and Tel Aviv during rush hours. The northern sections are also congested at times, especially during weekends and holidays, when many Israelis travel north for vacation.

HistoryEdit

The first section of the highway between Tel Aviv and Netanya was built in the early 1950s as a two lane road with at-grade intersections. The next section was built later that decade, extending the highway north to Olga Junction in Hadera. This section was also built as a two lane road. In 1965 the highway was widened to four lanes between Tel Aviv and Hadera, however grade separations were not built at this point.

The last section of the highway, between Olga Junction and Haifa, opened in 1969. When this section opened it was the first freeway in Israel. Deteriorating road conditions caused by years of neglect led to this section being downgraded from its original freeway status. Road signs on this section are still blue (as opposed to green on regular highways), however there are a few sings indicating an entrance or exit from a freeway and the maximum speed limit is 90–110 km/h, which makes it an Israeli freeway.

The junctions on the older sections of the highway were gradually grade separated: Netanya Interchange was built in 1974, Poleg Interchange in 1975, Havazelet Interchange in 1989, Yanai Interchange in 1990, Olga Interchange in 1993, Hof HaSharon Interchange in 1994 and Rabin Interchange and HaSira Interchange in 1995. Today the highway is grade separated along its entire route between the Haifa South and West Glilot interchanges.

The Tel Aviv–Netanya section was widened to six lanes in the 1990s.

The West Glilot Interchange opened on February 28, 2007, providing a direct connection to eastbound Highway 5 and the Ayalon Highway.

Coastal roadway corridorEdit

The Carmel Tunnels form a northern extension of Highway 2, which connects directly to Highway 22 in the Krayot area north of Haifa. This northern extension along with the Ayalon Highway and parts of Highway 4 make up a series of controlled-access highways that together form an inter-city highway corridor stretching along most of Israel's Mediterranean coast, from Acre (Akko) in the north to Ashdod in the south. In the future a parallel, but more inland controlled-access corridor will also be provided by Highway 6 when it is fully built.

PlansEdit

There are plans to continue the six lane section north to the Zikhron Ya'akov Interchange. These plans also include upgrading the remaining section between Zikhron Ya'akov and Haifa back to freeway standards. As part of this effort, works to rebuild and widen the section between Havatzelet HaSharon and the Olga interchange are expected to commence in 2020 at a cost of NIS1.2 billion (equivalent to UD$330 million).

InterchangesEdit

Location km Name Type Meaning Road(s) crossed
Ramat Aviv
Ramat HaSharon
0 מחלף גלילות מערב
(Glilot Ma'arav Interchange)
  
 
Named after location of former
Jewish refugee camp Glilot
  Highway 5,
Namir Road
Herzliya 3 מחלף הסירה
(HaSira Interchange)
   The Boat   Route 541
5 מחלף רבין
(Rabin
Interchange)
   Named after
Yitzhak Rabin
Keren Hayesod St.
Rishpon 7.5 צומת רשפון
(Rishpon Junction)
northbound only
   HaKfar St.
Shefayim 10 מחלף חוף השרון
(Hof HaSharon Interchange)
   Sharon Beach local roads
Ga'ash 10.5     Highway 20,
  to Route 531
Yakum 11.2 מחלף יקום
(Yakum Interchange)
northbound only
   He shall rise local road
Wingate Institute 11.2 מחלף וינגייט
(Wingate Interchange)
southbound only
   entrance road
Udim 11.2 מחלף אודים
(Udim Interchange)
northbound only
   Firebrands HaTse'elon St.
Netanya 17 מחלף פולג
(Poleg Interchange)
   Named after nearby
Poleg Stream
  Route 553
19 מחלף גשר השלום
(Gesher HaShalom Interchange)
   Peace Bridge   Road 5611
23 מחלף נתניה
(Netanya Interchange)
   gift of God   Highway 57
Havatzelet HaSharon 27 מחלף חבצלת
(Havatzelet Interchange)
   Sand Lily   Road 5710
Beit Yanai 30 מחלף ינאי
(Yanai Interchange)
   Rabbi Yannai   Road 5720
Hadera 33 (Planned)     Highway 9
38 מחלף אולגה
(Olga Interchange)
   Named after location
ult. Olga Hankin
Aaron Aaronsohn St.
Caesarea 41 מחלף קיסריה
(Caesarea Interchange)
   Named after location   Highway 65
Or Akiva 46 מחלף אור עקיבא
(Or Akiva Interchange)
   Light of Akiva Road 6511
Zikhron Ya'akov 53 מחלף זכרון יעקב
(Zikhron Ya'akov Interchange)
   Jacob's Memorial   Highway 70
Atlit 68 מחלף עתלית
(Atlit Interchange)
   Named after location   Route 721
  Road 7110
Haifa 77 מחלף חיפה דרום
(Haifa Darom Interchange)
   Haifa South   Highway 4
  Highway 23

ReferencesEdit

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External linksEdit

  • Video journey of the entire highway – The freeway section begins at the Glilot Interchange around 18m30s into the video. The Yarkon River bridge can be seen at 13m20s. The section between the Yarkon River bridge and the Glilot Interchange served as the main northern entrance to Tel Aviv until the Ayalon Highway was completed in the early 1990s.