Lord High Steward of Scotland

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Arms of Stewart, Hereditary Grand Steward of Scotland: Or, a fess chequy argent and azure, adopted at the start of the age of heraldry, c.1200-1215. Part of the High Steward's role was managing the King's finances, the accounting for which was performed on a chequered cloth (as in the Exchequer in England) to help them count coins, hence the fess chequy
Arms of Stewart, Hereditary Grand Steward of Scotland, as revived in a new marshalling arrangement in 1974 by the Queen for use by Prince Charles, in his capacity as Duke of Rothesay, quartering the arms of the Lord of the Isles, and with overall an inescutcheon of the royal arms of Scotland with a label of three points azure.

The Prince of Wales had the idea of incorporating his Scottish titles - Duke of Rothesay, Lord of the Isles and Great Steward of Scotland - into a banner. It was designed in 1974 by Sir Iain Moncrieffe in his capacity as Albany Herald and approved by The Queen later that year. The standard, exclusively for use when The Prince is in Scotland, was first flown on 21st July 1976, when he visited Loch Kishorn, Wester Ross, to launch the Ninian Central oil platform production dock, the site of which was part of the ancient lordship of the Isles. The standard is also known as "His Royal Highness's Scottish Banner" (official web-site of the Prince of Wales[2])

The title of High Steward or Great Steward is that of an officer who controls the domestic affairs of a royal household. In the 12th century King David I of Scotland gave the title to Walter fitzAlan, a nobleman from Brittany, whose descendants adopted the surname "Steward", later "Stewart" and later founded the royal House of Stewart.[1] A junior branch of the Stewart family descended from the younger son of Alexander Stewart, 4th High Steward of Scotland (d.1283), namely "Stewart of Darnley", paternal ancestors of King James I & VI, lived for several generations in France, when the name became spelt in the French manner "Stuart" and "Dernelé".[2] In 1371 Robert Stewart, 7th High Steward of Scotland inherited the throne of Scotland via his mother and became King Robert II of Scotland, when the title or office of High Steward of Scotland merged into the crown. However it was re-granted by the monarch to his elder son and heir apparent, together with the titles Duke of Rothesay (created 1398) and Baron of Renfrew (created 1404). Thus, currently, The Prince of Wales is High Steward of Scotland, sometimes known as the Prince and Great Steward of Scotland.[3][4]

High Stewards of Scotland, c. 1150–presentEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Scott, Walter (1830). The History of Scotland. Carey & Lea. p. 219. Retrieved 2 December 2018. title of High Steward.
  2. ^ Cust, Lady Elizabeth, Some Account of the Stuarts of Aubigny, in France, London, 1891[1]
  3. ^ Hanks, Patrick; Coates, Richard; McClure, Peter (2016). The Oxford Dictionary of Family Names in Britain and Ireland. Oxford University Press. p. 2550. ISBN 9780192527479. Retrieved 2 December 2018.
  4. ^ Ertl, Alan W. (2013). Scotland's Road to Independence: The Makings of a State Identity. Universal-Publishers. p. 138. ISBN 9781612332864. Retrieved 2 December 2018.