Herbert Bunston

Herbert Bunston (15 April 1874 – 27 February 1935) was an English stage and screen actor. He is remembered for his role as Dr. John Seward in the Broadway and film versions of Dracula.

Herbert Bunston
Born(1874-04-15)15 April 1874
Dorset, England, UK
Died27 February 1935(1935-02-27) (aged 60)
OccupationActor
Years active1929–1935
Spouse(s)Emily Fox Chaffey (1897-1935) (his death)
Children2

Bunston was born in Charmouth[1] and briefly attended Cranleigh School in Surrey.[2] before working as an actor. Bunston emigrated to the United States in 1922. His first Broadway appearance was Arthur Wing Pinero's The Enchanted Cottage in 1923. Other short-running roles in That Awful Mrs. Eaton! and Simon Called Peter were followed by a critically noticed role in a run of 260 performances of 1925's Young Woodley. On 5 October 1927, Bunston debuted as Dr John Seward in a Broadway production of Dracula alongside Bela Lugosi.[2]

Bunston's other Broadway credits include Young Woodley (1925), Simon Called Peter (1924), That Awful Mrs. Eaton (1924), The Enchanted Cottage (1923), and Drink (1903).[3]

Bunston's stage success led to a contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer. Between 1929 and 1935 he had mainly character roles in over 30 films, and 1931 he re-created his Broadway role in the film adaptation of Dracula.[2] Bunston died of a heart attack in 1935.[citation needed]

Bunston married Emily Fox Chaffey (1866-1939) in 1898 and they had two children, Margaret, and John.[1]

Partial filmographyEdit

References/Edit

  1. ^ a b "Ancestry® | Genealogy, Family Trees & Family History Records". www.ancestry.co.uk. Retrieved 23 February 2020.
  2. ^ a b c "Herbert Bunston | Cranleigh School 1865". Retrieved 25 February 2020.
  3. ^ "Herbert Bunston". Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. Archived from the original on 23 October 2020. Retrieved 23 October 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  • Coughlin, Jim. "The Supporting Players of Universal's Dracula". Midnight Marquee #49, pp. 63–7.
  • "Herbert Bunston". Variety (US), March 6, 1935, p62.

External linksEdit