Henry of Oyta

Henry of Oyta (German: Heinrich Totting von Oyta; c. 1330 – 1397) was a German theologian and nominalist philosopher.

LifeEdit

He was born at Friesoythe in present-day Lower Saxony.[1] Henry graduated M.A. at the University of Prague in 1355. He was then rector of a school in Erfurt, and returned to Prague in 1366.[2] In the course of a long-running dispute, Adalbert Ranconis accused him of heresy in 1369–70.[3] He began teaching at the University of Paris in 1377.[4] For reasons connected with the Western Schism, he left Paris in 1381;[5] he then taught at Prague, 1381 to 1381, lecturing there on the Psalms and Gospel of John.[4][6] He was at the University of Vienna 1384? to 1390;[7] he drew up the statutes there in 1389, with Henry of Langenstein.[8]

He died in Vienna.

WorksEdit

  • Tractatus de contractibus[9]

Around 1374 he abridged the Sentences commentary of Adam Wodeham.[10]

See alsoEdit

NotesEdit

  1. ^ (in German) deutsche-biographie.de, Heinrich Totting von Oyta.
  2. ^ Mordechai Feingold (20 July 2006). History of Universities: Volume XXI/1. Oxford University Press. p. 212. ISBN 978-0-19-929738-2. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ Stefan Swieżawski (1997). Les tribulations de l'ecclésiologie à la fin du Moyen Age (in French). Editions Beauchesne. p. 17 note 64. ISBN 978-2-7010-1351-0. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ a b Guillaume Henri Marie Posthumus Meyjes (1999). Jean Gerson, Apostle of Unity: His Church Politics and Ecclesiology. BRILL. p. 323. ISBN 978-90-04-11296-4. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Guillaume Henri Marie Posthumus Meyjes (1999). Jean Gerson, Apostle of Unity: His Church Politics and Ecclesiology. BRILL. p. 22. ISBN 978-90-04-11296-4. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  6. ^ Bernard McGinn; John Meyendorff (1987). Christian Spirituality: High Middle Ages and Reformation. Routledge & Kegan Paul. p. 113. ISBN 978-0-7102-1313-6. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  7. ^ Annabel S. Brett (16 October 2003). Liberty, Right and Nature: Individual Rights in Later Scholastic Thought. Cambridge University Press. p. 31. ISBN 978-0-521-54340-8. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  8. ^ Hilde de Ridder-Symoens (16 October 2003). A History of the University in Europe: Volume 1, Universities in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press. p. 436. ISBN 978-0-521-54113-8. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  9. ^ Odd Langholm (13 February 1998). The Legacy of Scholasticism in Economic Thought: Antecedents of Choice and Power. Cambridge University Press. p. 205. ISBN 978-0-521-62159-5. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  10. ^ Basil Studer (15 March 2008). History of Theology: The Middle Ages. Liturgical Press. p. 500. ISBN 978-0-8146-5916-8. Retrieved 3 August 2012. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External linksEdit