Henry D. Barron

Henry Danforth Barron (April 10, 1833 – January 22, 1882) was an American lawyer, politician, and judge. He was the 17th and 23rd Speaker of the Wisconsin State Assembly, served six years as a Wisconsin Circuit Court Judge, and was a member of the Wisconsin State Senate. He also held several local offices and was a member of the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents.[1]

The Honorable

Henry D. Barron
Wisconsin Circuit Court Judge for the 11th Circuit
In office
January 1, 1877 – January 22, 1882
Preceded bySolon H. Clough
Succeeded bySolon H. Clough
Wisconsin Circuit Court Judge for the 8th Circuit
In office
July 1860 – January 1, 1861
Appointed byAlexander Randall
Preceded byS. S. N. Fuller
Succeeded byL. P. Wetherby
17th and 23rd Speaker of the Wisconsin Assembly
In office
January 8, 1873 – January 14, 1874
Preceded byDaniel Hall
Succeeded byGabriel Bouck
In office
January 10, 1866 – January 9, 1867
Preceded byWilliam W. Field
Succeeded byAngus Cameron
Member of the Wisconsin Senate
from the 24th district
In office
January 1, 1874 – January 1, 1877
Preceded byJoseph E. Irish
Succeeded bySam S. Fifield
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Ashland, Barron, Bayfield, Burnett, Douglas, and Polk district
In office
January 1, 1872 – January 1, 1874
Preceded bySamuel S. Vaughn
Succeeded bySam S. Fifield
In office
January 1, 1866 – January 1, 1870
Preceded byAlbert C. Stuntz
Succeeded bySamuel B. Dresser
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
from the Ashland, Burnett, Dallas, Douglas, La Pointe, and Polk district
In office
January 1, 1863 – January 1, 1865
Preceded byGeorge R. Stuntz
Succeeded byAmos S. Gray
Personal details
Born
Henry Danforth Barron

(1833-04-10)April 10, 1833
Wilton, New York
DiedJanuary 22, 1882(1882-01-22) (aged 48)
Resting placePrairie Home Cemetery
Waukesha, Wisconsin
Political party

BiographyEdit

Born in Wilton, New York, he graduated from law school at Ballston Spa, New York, and moved to Wisconsin in 1851.[2] After arriving in Wisconsin, he became a publisher of the Waukesha Democrat and its successor, the Chronotype. He was also appointed Postmaster of Waukesha by President Franklin Pierce. He relocated to Pepin County in 1857 and began a law practice. He was appointed Wisconsin Circuit Court Judge by Governor Alexander Randall in 1860 and served until the election of a successor.[1]

In 1862, he was elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly from the vast northwestern assembly district comprising the lightly populated counties of Ashland, Burnett, Dallas (now Barron), Douglas, La Pointe (now Bayfield), and Polk. He was re-elected in 1863, 1865, 1866, 1867, 1868, 1871, and 1872.[1]

In 1869, he was offered appointment as Chief Justice for the Dakota Territory by President Ulysses S. Grant, but turned it down. He was subsequently appointed fifth auditor of the United States Treasury, in April 1869, and served in that role until he returned to the Assembly in January 1872.[1]

He was chosen as speaker for the 1866 and 1873 legislative sessions. In 1873, he was elected to the Wisconsin Senate, and, was elected president pro tem of the Senate in 1875. He was re-elected to his senate seat in 1875, but resigned in 1876 to return to the Circuit Court. He remained on the court until his death in 1882.[1]

In addition to his public offices, he was a Republican presidential elector in the 1868 and 1872 presidential elections, and was chosen president of the electoral college for both elections. He was a Vice President of the Wisconsin Historical Society, and a member of the University of Wisconsin Board of Regents.[1]

Barron lived in St. Croix County, Wisconsin. Barron County, Wisconsin, which he represented for many years as "Dallas County", was named after him by act of the legislature in 1869.[3][4]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c d e f Bashford, R. M., ed. (1876). "Official directory". The legislative manual of the state of Wisconsin (Report). State of Wisconsin. p. 457. Retrieved December 11, 2019.
  2. ^ http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/dictionary/index.asp?action=view&term_id=2253&keyword=barron
  3. ^ "The Political Graveyard: Index to Politicians: Barrett-england to Barrus".
  4. ^ Chicago and North Western Railway Company (1908). A History of the Origin of the Place Names Connected with the Chicago & North Western and Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis & Omaha Railways. p. 159.