Hematopathology

Hematopathology or hemopathology (both also spelled haem-, see spelling differences) is the study of diseases and disorders affecting and found in blood cells, their production, and any organs and tissues involved in hematopoiesis, such as bone marrow, the spleen, and the thymus.[1][2] Diagnoses and treatment of diseases such as leukemia and lymphoma often deal with hematopathology; techniques and technologies include flow cytometry studies[3] and immunohistochemistry.

Hematopathologist
Occupation
Names
  • Physician
Occupation type
Specialty
Activity sectors
Medicine
Description
Education required
Fields of
employment
Hospitals, Clinics

In the United States, hematopathology is a board-certified subspecialty by the American Board of Pathology. Board-eligible or board-certified hematopathologists are usually pathology residents (anatomic, clinical, or combined) who have completed hematopathology fellowship training after their pathology residency. The hematopathology fellowship lasts either one or two years. A physician who practices hematopathology is called a hematopathologist.

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Hematology". Johns Hopkins Medicine. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  2. ^ "Hematopathology". UPMC. Retrieved 2 April 2018.
  3. ^ "Flow Cytometry and Hematopathology". University of Rochester Medical Center. Retrieved 4 October 2020.

External linksEdit