Hatillo, Puerto Rico

Hatillo (Spanish pronunciation: [aˈtiʎo]) is a municipality located in Puerto Rico's north coast, bordered by the Atlantic Ocean to the north, Lares and Utuado to the south, Camuy to the west, and Arecibo to the east. According to the 2000 US Census Hatillo is spread over nine barrios and Hatillo Pueblo (the downtown area and the administrative center of the city). It is part of the San Juan-Caguas-Guaynabo Metropolitan Statistical Area.

Hatillo

Municipio de Hatillo
City and Municipality
Sunset over La Marina in Hatillo
Sunset over La Marina in Hatillo
Flag of Hatillo
Flag
Coat of arms of Hatillo
Coat of arms
Nicknames: 
"El Pueblo sin Sopa", "Capital De La Industria Lechera"' "Hatillo Del Corazón De Riego", "Tierra de Campos Verdes", "Los Ganaderos"
Anthem: "De un mar azul en el Atlántico"
Map of Puerto Rico highlighting Hatillo Municipality
Map of Puerto Rico highlighting Hatillo Municipality
Coordinates: 18°29′11″N 66°49′32″W / 18.48639°N 66.82556°W / 18.48639; -66.82556Coordinates: 18°29′11″N 66°49′32″W / 18.48639°N 66.82556°W / 18.48639; -66.82556
Commonwealth Puerto Rico
FoundedJune 30, 1823
Barrios
Government
 • MayorJosé A. Rodríguez Cruz (PPD)
 • Senatorial dist.3 - Arecibo
 • Representative dist.15
Area
 • Total58.73 sq mi (152.10 km2)
 • Land41.78 sq mi (108.22 km2)
 • Water16.94 sq mi (43.88 km2)
Population
 (2015)
 • Total41,047
 • Density700/sq mi (270/km2)
Demonym(s)Hatillanos
Time zoneUTC-4 (AST)
ZIP Code
00659
Area code(s)787/939
Major routesPR primary 2.svg PR secondary 129.svg Ellipse sign 119.svg Ellipse sign 130.svg Ellipse sign 134.svg
Toll plate yellow.svg
PR primary 22.svg

HistoryEdit

Agustín Ruiz Miranda, a Canarian immigrant, founded Hatillo on approximately ten cuerdas (a cuerda is 0.97 acre, also called a Spanish acre) in 1823. Miranda granted this land on the condition that public buildings be erected and wide streets be built, and that the remaining land be sold or used for homes.[1]

In its first year, Hatillo had 910 people; increasing to 2,663 inhabitants the following year distributed among the central town and the barrios of Carrizales, Capáez, Naranjito, Corcovado, Buena Vista, (formerly Yeguada Occidental), Campo Alegre, (formerly Yeguada Oriental), Pajuil, Bayaney, Aibonito, and Barrio Pueblo. Barrio Pajuil had disappeared by the 1940 census being divided up between Buena Vista, Naranjito, Corcovado and Campo Alegre barrios. There were also two sugarcane plantations named “Hacienda Santa Rosa” measuring 150 cuerdas and “Hacienda Perseverancia” at 50 cuerdas.

Puerto Rico was ceded by Spain in the aftermath of the Spanish-American War under the terms of the Treaty of Paris of 1898 and became a territory of the United States. In 1899, the United States conducted its first census of Puerto Rico finding that the population of Hatillo was 1,148.[2]

Hatillo, like several other municipalities on the island, experienced boundary changes from the 1902 municipality consolidation law (Consolidación de Ciertos Términos Municipales de Puerto Rico) in which Hatillo was annexed temporarily into neighboring Camuy. Three years later the territorial legislature approved the reformation of Hatillo as a separate municipality (independent town) from Camuy in 1905.[3] In 1910, Barrio Pueblo (rural) changed its name to Hatillo barrio (rural). In 1930, Yeguadilla Occidental and Yeguadilla Oriental barrios' names were changed to Buena Vista and Campo Alegre, respectively. As mentioned before, Pajuil barrio disappeared by the 1940 census being divided up between barrios Buena Vista, Naranjito, Corcovado and Campo Alegre. In 1947 the Planning Commission of Puerto Rico issued a new map of Hatillo municipality and its barrios. As a result of this new map, the central town was expanded to include part of Hatillo barrio (rural) and the name of “Corcovados” was changed to "Corcovado”.

Hurricane MariaEdit

Hurricane Maria on September 20, 2017 triggered numerous landslides in Hatillo with the significant amount of rainfall.[4][5]

GeographyEdit

Hatillo is a coastal town on the northern side of Puerto Rico.[6] There are 9 bridges in Hatillo.[7]

BarriosEdit

 
Subdivisions of Hatillo

Like all municipalities of Puerto Rico, Hatillo is subdivided into barrios. The municipal buildings, central square and large Catholic church are located in a small barrio referred to as "el pueblo".[8][9][10][11]

SectorsEdit

Barrios (which are like minor civil divisions)[12] and subbarrios,[13] in turn, are further subdivided into smaller local populated place areas/units called sectores (sectors in English). The types of sectores may vary, from normally sector to urbanización to reparto to barriada to residencial, among others.[14][15][16]

Special CommunitiesEdit

Comunidades Especiales de Puerto Rico (Special Communities of Puerto Rico) are marginalized communities whose citizens are experiencing a certain amount of social exclusion. A map shows these communities occur in nearly every municipality of the commonwealth. Of the 742 places that were on the list in 2014, the following barrios, communities, sectors, or neighborhoods were in Hatillo: Altos de Fuego, Clan neighborhood, Aibonito, Naranjito, Bayaney, and Buena Vista.[17][18]

TourismEdit

 
Playa Sardinera
 
Playa La Marina in Hatillo

Landmarks and places of interestEdit

There are 10 beaches in Hatillo.[19] Other places of interest in Hatillo include:[20]

  • Antigua Central Bayaney
  • Paseo del Carmen
  • Francisco "Pancho" Deida Méndez Coliseum
  • Hacienda Santa Rosa Ruins
  • Iglesia de Nuestra Señora del Carmen
  • Juan Carmelo "Tito" Rodríguez Donate Stadium
  • José Antonio Monrouzeau Theater
  • La Marina
  • Los Ilustres Park
  • Virgen del Carmen Parish
  • Plaza del Norte Mall
  • Sardinera Beach
  • Trapiche de Santa Rosa

EconomyEdit

 
Hatillo, Puerto Rico human and cow population in 2010 sign

AgricultureEdit

Today, Hatillo is the major producer of milk on the island and produces a third of the milk consumed in Puerto Rico.[6]

BusinessEdit

Plaza del Norte is a shopping mall located in the barrio of Carrizales.

DemographicsEdit

Historical population
Census Pop.
190010,449
191010,6301.7%
192013,97931.5%
193016,16815.7%
194018,32213.3%
195020,87713.9%
196020,238−3.1%
197021,9138.3%
198028,95832.1%
199032,70312.9%
200038,92519.0%
201041,9537.8%
U.S. Decennial Census[21]
1899 (shown as 1900)[22] 1910-1930[23]
1930-1950[24] 1960-2000[25] 2010[10]

CultureEdit

Festivals and eventsEdit

Hatillo celebrates its patron saint festival in July. The Fiestas Patronales de Nuestra Señora del Carmen is a religious and cultural celebration that generally features parades, games, artisans, amusement rides, regional food, and live entertainment.[26][20]

Other festivals and events celebrated in Hatillo include:

  • Fiestas de la Cruz - May
  • Festival de la Herencia Canaria - May
  • Hatillo Music And Culinary Fest - May
  • Festival de la Caña de Azucar- May
  • Festival de la Leche Fresca - June
  • Hatillo es Bomba y Plena - October
  • Cooperative Movement Traditional festival- October
  • Festival de las Máscaras (Mask Festival)- December
  • Christmas festival - December

The Mask Festival began in 1823, and was imported by the immigrants from the Canary Islands, where the traditional festival originated. The early tradition of the festival required that the male population dress as women and they would visit each residence where the owners would offer them food and drinks. Currently the festival is celebrated every year on December 28. The Masks are fashioned and based on the biblical story of King Herod (Herod the Great). The costumes used are very elaborate and the Masks represent the soldiers which were sent by the King Herod to kill all boys age three and younger, after hearing about a new king being born as told by The Three Wise Men. The festival, however is presented in humor and said soldiers only joke around and ride on chariots.[20]

SymbolsEdit

FlagEdit

The flag consists of three broad stripes - Blue, Yellow and Green. Blue represents the sea, yellow represents the material and artistic wealth of the town, and green represents the vegetation of its fields in all its territorial extension.[1][27]

Coat of armsEdit

On top of the shield is a gold crown with three towers over a silver field a Custard Apple tree (annona reticulata) and a field with two cows in gold which is over eight blue and silver-plated waves. At the center is a shield of "La Orden del Carmen". Under the shield the motto is inscribed, Hatillo Del Corazón.[1][27]

GalleryEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ a b c "Hatillo Municipality Founding History and Symbols". enciclopediapr.org. Fundación Puertorriqueña de las Humanidades (FPH). Archived from the original on 14 February 2019. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  2. ^ Joseph Prentiss Sanger; Henry Gannett; Walter Francis Willcox (1900). Informe sobre el censo de Puerto Rico, 1899, United States. War Dept. Porto Rico Census Office (in Spanish). Imprenta del gobierno. p. 161. Archived from the original on 2012-11-15. Retrieved 2020-05-04.
  3. ^ "El futuro de los municipios". El Nuevo Dia. March 22, 2019. Archived from the original on March 22, 2019. Retrieved May 4, 2020.
  4. ^ "Preliminary Locations of Landslide Impacts from Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico". USGS Landslide Hazards Program. USGS. Archived from the original on 2019-03-03. Retrieved 2019-03-03.
  5. ^ "Preliminary Locations of Landslide Impacts from Hurricane Maria, Puerto Rico" (PDF). USGS Landslide Hazards Program. USGS. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2019-03-03. Retrieved 2019-03-03.
  6. ^ a b "Hatillo Municipality General Info (Location, Square Miles, Economy and Geography)". enciclopediapr.org. Fundación Puertorriqueña de las Humanidades (FPH). Archived from the original on 14 February 2019. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  7. ^ "Hatillo Bridges". National Bridge Inventory Data. US Dept. of Transportation. Archived from the original on 20 February 2019. Retrieved 19 February 2019.
  8. ^ Picó, Rafael; Buitrago de Santiago, Zayda; Berrios, Hector H. Nueva geografía de Puerto Rico: física, económica, y social, por Rafael Picó. Con la colaboración de Zayda Buitrago de Santiago y Héctor H. Berrios. San Juan Editorial Universitaria, Universidad de Puerto Rico,1969. Archived from the original on 2018-12-26. Retrieved 2018-12-28.
  9. ^ Gwillim Law (20 May 2015). Administrative Subdivisions of Countries: A Comprehensive World Reference, 1900 through 1998. McFarland. p. 300. ISBN 978-1-4766-0447-3. Retrieved 25 December 2018.
  10. ^ a b Puerto Rico:2010:population and housing unit counts.pdf (PDF). U.S. Dept. of Commerce, Economics and Statistics Administration, U.S. Census Bureau. 2010. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2017-02-20. Retrieved 2018-12-28.
  11. ^ "Map of Hatillo at the Wayback Machine" (PDF). Archived from the original (PDF) on 2018-03-24. Retrieved 2018-12-29.
  12. ^ "US Census Barrio-Pueblo definition". factfinder.com. US Census. Archived from the original on 13 May 2017. Retrieved 5 January 2019.
  13. ^ "P.L. 94-171 VTD/SLD Reference Map (2010 Census): Hatillo Municipio, PR" (PDF). www2.census.gov. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Economics and Statistics Administration U.S. Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on 23 August 2020. Retrieved 22 August 2020.
  14. ^ "Agencia: Oficina del Coordinador General para el Financiamiento Socioeconómico y la Autogestión (Proposed 2016 Budget)". Puerto Rico Budgets (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 28 June 2019. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  15. ^ Rivera Quintero, Marcia (2014), El vuelo de la esperanza: Proyecto de las Comunidades Especiales Puerto Rico, 1997-2004 (first ed.), San Juan, Puerto Rico Fundación Sila M. Calderón, ISBN 978-0-9820806-1-0
  16. ^ "Leyes del 2001". Lex Juris Puerto Rico (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 14 September 2018. Retrieved 24 June 2020.
  17. ^ Rivera Quintero, Marcia (2014), El vuelo de la esperanza: Proyecto de las Comunidades Especiales Puerto Rico, 1997-2004 (1st ed.), San Juan, Puerto Rico Fundación Sila M. Calderón, p. 273, ISBN 978-0-9820806-1-0
  18. ^ "Comunidades Especiales de Puerto Rico" (in Spanish). 8 August 2011. Archived from the original on 24 June 2019. Retrieved 24 June 2019.
  19. ^ "Las 1,200 playas de Puerto Rico [The 1200 beaches of Puerto Rico]". Primera Hora (in Spanish). April 14, 2017. Archived from the original on December 12, 2019. Retrieved December 12, 2019.
  20. ^ a b c "Hatillo Municipality Festivals, Places, Mayor". enciclopediapr.org. Fundación Puertorriqueña de las Humanidades (FPH). Archived from the original on 14 February 2019. Retrieved 14 February 2019.
  21. ^ "U.S. Decennial Census". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on February 13, 2020. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  22. ^ "Report of the Census of Porto Rico 1899". War Department, Office Director Census of Porto Rico. Archived from the original on July 16, 2017. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  23. ^ "Table 3-Population of Municipalities: 1930, 1920, and 1910" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 17, 2017. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  24. ^ "Table 4-Area and Population of Municipalities, Urban and Rural: 1930 to 1950" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on August 30, 2015. Retrieved September 21, 2014.
  25. ^ "Table 2 Population and Housing Units: 1960 to 2000" (PDF). United States Census Bureau. Archived (PDF) from the original on July 24, 2017. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  26. ^ "Puerto Rico Festivales, Eventos y Actividades en Puerto Rico". Puerto Rico Hoteles y Paradores (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 2020-02-26. Retrieved 2020-07-17.
  27. ^ a b "HATILLO". LexJuris (Leyes y Jurisprudencia) de Puerto Rico (in Spanish). 19 February 2020. Archived from the original on 19 February 2020. Retrieved 17 September 2020.

External linksEdit