Harry Bowen (actor)

Harry Bowen (October 4, 1888 – December 5, 1941) was an American character actor of the silent and sound film eras. Born on October 4, 1888 in Brooklyn, New York, he broke into the film industry doing film shorts during the silent era. His work on shorts continued into talking pictures, and it was in 1929 that he made his first appearance in a full-length feature, with a small role in Red Hot Rhythm, directed by Leo McCarey.[1] During his 20-year career, Bowen appeared in over 150 films, most of them film shorts.[2] Other notable films in which he appeared include: the 1933 classic King Kong;[3] Flying Down to Rio (1933), which was the first on-screen pairing of Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers;[4] John Ford's 1935 comedy, The Whole Town's Talking, starring Edward G. Robinson;[5] and Next Time We Love (1936), starring Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart, and Ray Milland.[6] His final screen performance, according to AFI, was the 1939 film, The Day the Bookies Wept, starring Joe Penner and Betty Grable.[7]

Harry Bowen
Born(1888-10-04)October 4, 1888
Brooklyn, New York, United States
DiedDecember 5, 1941(1941-12-05) (aged 53)
Los Angeles, California, United States
OccupationActor
Years active1920–39

Bowen died on December 5, 1941, at the age of 53 in Los Angeles, California.[2]

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ "Red Hot Rhythm: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2014. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  2. ^ a b "Harry Bowen". Internet Movie Database. Archived from the original on June 10, 2015. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  3. ^ "King Kong: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 17, 2015. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  4. ^ "Flying Down to Rio: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on April 2, 2015. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  5. ^ "The Whole Town's Talking: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on March 28, 2014. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  6. ^ "Next Time We Love: Detail View". American Film Institute. Archived from the original on December 22, 2014. Retrieved June 10, 2015.
  7. ^ "Harry Bowen". American Film Institute. Retrieved June 10, 2015.

External linksEdit