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Harlow Town railway station is on the West Anglia Main Line serving the town of Harlow in Essex, England. It is 22 miles 59 chains (36.6 km) down the line from London Liverpool Street and is situated between Roydon and Harlow Mill stations. Its three-letter station code is HWN.

Harlow Town National Rail
Harlowtown3.jpg
Platform 3
Location
PlaceHarlow
Local authorityBorough of Harlow
Coordinates51°46′52″N 0°05′42″E / 51.781°N 0.095°E / 51.781; 0.095Coordinates: 51°46′52″N 0°05′42″E / 51.781°N 0.095°E / 51.781; 0.095
Grid referenceTL446112
Operations
Station codeHWN
Managed byGreater Anglia
Number of platforms4
DfT categoryC1
Live arrivals/departures, station information and onward connections
from National Rail Enquiries
Annual rail passenger usage*
2013/14Increase 1.700 million
2014/15Increase 1.791 million
2015/16Increase 1.851 million
2016/17Increase 1.909 million
2017/18Decrease 1.886 million
History
Key datesOpened 1842 (1842)
Listed status
Listed featureHarlow Town Station including Platform Structures
Listing gradeGrade II listed
Entry number1117351[1]
Added to list25 November 1995
National RailUK railway stations
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
* Annual estimated passenger usage based on sales of tickets in stated financial year(s) which end or originate at Harlow Town from Office of Rail and Road statistics. Methodology may vary year on year.

The station and all trains serving it are operated by Greater Anglia.

HistoryEdit

The station was opened in 1842 as Burnt Mill, to serve the small village of the same name.

 
The station building in 2007

Between March 1959 and July 1960 the station was rebuilt[2] to serve the post-war new town of Harlow, to designs by Paul Hamilton with John Bicknell and Ian Fraser of the British Railways (Eastern Region) architects department (chief architect: H. H. Powell). Described by Pevsner as "low, crisp and entirely ungimmicky", its architectural quality was recognised in 1996 when it was made a Grade II listed building. The listing entry states "the Eastern Region Architect's Department was the most creative branch of British Railways, designing a number of powerful modern stations in conjunction with the Region's electrification. The new station for Harlow New Town was the flagship of this achievement. It is a building with powerful spatial qualities, of especial interest particularly for its architectural design".[3]

The Architect and Building News in 1959[4] said the architects have aimed at expressing the beauty of continuous surfaces of natural materials and paintwork has been reduced to a minimum.

On 13 July 1960, the station was renamed Harlow Town. Its status as a listed building has meant that alterations to conform with the Disability Discrimination Act have had to be carried out sensitively to protect the original architectural conception.

ServicesEdit

 
A Network SouthEast Class 317 at Harlow Town in the mid-1990s

All services at the station are operated by Greater Anglia, although some are branded as Stansted Express. Trains are normally formed by Class 317 and Class 379 electric multiple units.

The typical off-peak service pattern in trains per hour is:

The station todayEdit

The station has four platforms. Platform 2 is for services towards London Liverpool Street and Stratford. Platform 3 is for services towards Stansted Airport and Cambridge. Platforms 1 and 4 are used less frequently for slow trains and as a Waiting loop for freight trains from the aggregate terminal a mile down the line, they are however used by a number of peak starting/terminating services to/from Liverpool Street or Stratford and by a few through trains northbound and southbound. Currently all platforms accommodate 12 car trains.

In December 2009 ticket barriers were installed at the station, to help reduce penalty fare evasion from the station. The platforms can accommodate 12 car trains.[5][6]

ReferencesEdit

 
A WAGN EMU travelling through Harlow Town station in 2001
  1. ^ Historic England, "Harlow Town Station including Platform Structures (1117351)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 2 June 2019
  2. ^ Lawrence, David (2018). British Rail Architecture 1948-97. Crecy Publishing Ltd. p. 76. ISBN 9780860936855.
  3. ^ http://unlockingessex.essexcc.gov.uk/
  4. ^ "British Railways Architecture". The Architect and Building News. 216 (13): 409. 1959.
  5. ^ "Greater Anglia Route Utilisation Strategy" (PDF). Network Rail. Retrieved 8 May 2009.
  6. ^ "National Rail Enquiries - Harlow Town station information". www.nationalrail.co.uk.

External linksEdit