Harding Township, New Jersey

Harding Township is a township in Morris County, in the U.S. state of New Jersey. It is located in the Passaic Valley region within the New York Metropolitan area. The township was formed as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on September 1, 1922, from portions of Passaic Township (since renamed as Long Hill Township), based on the results of a referendum passed on May 9, 1922.[18][19][20] As of the 2020 United States census, the township's population was 3,871,[9] an increase of 33 (+0.9%) from the 2010 census count of 3,838,[21][22] which in turn reflected an increase of 658 (+20.7%) from the 3,180 counted in the 2000 census.[23]

Harding Township, New Jersey
Hartley Farms
Hartley Farms
Location of Harding Township in Morris County highlighted in red (right). Inset map: Location of Morris County in New Jersey highlighted in orange (left).
Location of Harding Township in Morris County highlighted in red (right). Inset map: Location of Morris County in New Jersey highlighted in orange (left).
Census Bureau map of Harding Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Harding Township, New Jersey
Harding Township is located in Morris County, New Jersey
Harding Township
Harding Township
Location in Morris County
Harding Township is located in New Jersey
Harding Township
Harding Township
Location in New Jersey
Harding Township is located in the United States
Harding Township
Harding Township
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 40°44′16″N 74°29′43″W / 40.737825°N 74.495335°W / 40.737825; -74.495335[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Morris
IncorporatedSeptember 1, 1922
Named forWarren G. Harding
Government
 • TypeTownship
 • BodyTownship Committee
 • MayorTimothy D. Jones (R, term ends December 31, 2023)[3][4]
 • AdministratorRobert Falzarano[5]
 • Municipal clerkLisa A. Sharp[6]
Area
 • Total20.57 sq mi (53.28 km2)
 • Land20.05 sq mi (51.94 km2)
 • Water0.52 sq mi (1.34 km2)  2.51%
 • Rank140th of 565 in state
9th of 39 in county[1]
Elevation367 ft (112 m)
Population
 • Total3,871
 • Estimate 
(2023)[10]
3,891
 • Rank417th of 565 in state
36th of 39 in county[11]
 • Density193.0/sq mi (74.5/km2)
  • Rank506th of 565 in state
39th of 39 in county[11]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (EST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (EDT)
ZIP Code
Area code(s)973[14]
FIPS code3402729700[1][15][16]
GNIS feature ID0882195[1][17]
Websitewww.hardingnj.org

The long-established hamlets of New Vernon and Green Village (also within Chatham Township) are both located in Harding Township. The township is home to the private club community Mount Kemble Lake, a former summer colony developed in the 1920s.[24][25]

Described by The New York Times as "one of the most restrictive and elegant of New Jersey's residential suburban areas"[26] and as an "affluent Morris County township",[27] the community has been one of the state's highest-income municipalities. Harding Township had a per capita income of $109,472 and was ranked first in New Jersey based on data from the 2006–2010 American Community Survey from the United States Census Bureau, more than triple the statewide average of $34,858.[28] Based on data from the ACS for 2014–2018, Harding Township ranked sixth in the state with a median household income of $183,587 and had almost half of households earning more than $200 thousand annually.[29]

The 07976 ZIP Code for New Vernon was named one of the "25 Richest ZIP Codes" in the United States by Forbes magazine in 2006.[30] Many relatively unchanged large country estates that have been passed down through several generations attest to the wealth of many of its residents. Some have been listed on the National Register of Historic Places and some have nonprofit support organizations that assure the retention of the original nature of the properties.[31]

As of 2021, the median value of a home in Harding Township lies at $1,181,000.[32]

History

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After the retreat of the Wisconsin Glacier, a mighty glacial lake called Glacial Lake Passaic formed in this area that, about 15,000 to 11,000 years ago, extended for 30 miles (48 km) in length and was 10 miles (16 km) wide. The lake finally drained when a blockage of the Passaic River reopened. The Great Swamp is the remnant of the lake bottom and portions of the swamp lay in what now is the township. Once the lake drained, higher areas became a wooded area that was used for hunting, fishing, and farming by Native Americans. At the time of colonization by the Dutch it belonged to the Lenape tribes, but British colonists did their best to displace them westward.

Much of what now is known as Harding was an agricultural community with roots stretching as far back as the early 18th century. Bypassed by colonial turnpikes, revolution era canals, and railroads laid in the Victorian era, the area remained a rural backwater. For almost two centuries of European occupation, its open and rolling landscapes reflected its agricultural use, as land had been cleared for cattle pastures, orchards, and fields of grain.[33] The Great Swamp, the wooded slopes of the Watchung Mountains, and those near Jockey Hollow also were used by local farmers for wood supply. The communities of Green Village, Logansville, New Vernon, and Pleasantville were the village centers in this agricultural community.

Wealthy urban residents from Manhattan and Newark bought farmland, enlarged old farmhouses, and landscaped the grounds. The movement to establish Harding Township was driven by local property owners who wanted to maintain a bucolic community without suburban development.

The township was created in 1922 from the northern half of what was then Passaic Township (present day Long Hill Township) and it was named after the incumbent President of the United States, Warren G. Harding.[34][35]

The New Vernon Neighborhood Restrictive Agreement was established in 1928 by estate owners under which they agreed to voluntarily place restrictive covenants on their land that would require future owners of the properties to maintain the rural nature of the area.[36] This voluntary effort to limit development and save the pastoral qualities of over 1,000 acres (4.0 km2) across Harding Township influenced subsequent zoning codes, which emerged several decades later, and helped preserve the landscape to the present day.[33]

Geography

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According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 20.57 square miles (53.28 km2), including 20.05 square miles (51.94 km2) of land and 0.52 square miles (1.34 km2) of water (2.51%).[1][2] The township includes unincorporated communities, a portion of Green Village and all of New Vernon, both of which have origins as colonial settlements that predate the American Revolution. The governmental offices for the township are in New Vernon.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Baileys Mill, Dickson Mill, Glen Alpin, Jockey Hollow Park, Logansville, Mount Kemble Lake, Olmstead Mills, Osborn Mill, Pleasantville, Sugar Loaf and Van Dorens Mill.[37]

The township borders Mendham Township to the west, Madison to the northeast, Chatham Township to the east, Morris Township to the north, and Long Hill Township to the southeast in Morris County and Bernardsville to the southwest and Bernards Township to the south in Somerset County.[38][39][40]

Demographics

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Population

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Historical population
CensusPop.Note
19301,206
19401,56529.8%
19501,97025.9%
19602,68336.2%
19703,24921.1%
19803,236−0.4%
19903,64012.5%
20003,180−12.6%
20103,83820.7%
20203,8710.9%
2023 (est.)3,891[10]0.5%
Population sources:
1930[41] 1940–2000[42]
2000[43][44] 2010[21][22] 2020[9]

2010 census

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The 2010 United States census counted 3,838 people, 1,474 households, and 1,126 families in the township. The population density was 192.7 per square mile (74.4/km2). There were 1,610 housing units at an average density of 80.8 per square mile (31.2/km2). The racial makeup was 94.14% (3,613) White, 0.99% (38) Black or African American, 0.13% (5) Native American, 2.66% (102) Asian, 0.00% (0) Pacific Islander, 0.34% (13) from other races, and 1.75% (67) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.49% (134) of the population.[21]

Of the 1,474 households, 31.2% had children under the age of 18; 68.7% were married couples living together; 5.7% had a female householder with no husband present and 23.6% were non-families. Of all households, 20.6% were made up of individuals and 10.2% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.60 and the average family size was 3.00.[21]

24.0% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 14.5% from 25 to 44, 35.8% from 45 to 64, and 21.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 48.9 years. For every 100 females, the population had 93.7 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 93.1 males.[21]

The Census Bureau's 2006–2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $168,365 (with a margin of error of +/− $37,371) and the median family income was $185,647 (+/− $30,739). Males had a median income of $123,854 (+/− $38,454) versus $66,131 (+/− $25,727) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $109,472 (+/− $24,951). About 6.8% of families and 7.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 13.5% of those under age 18 and 3.3% of those age 65 or over.[45]

2000 census

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As of the 2000 United States census[15] there were 3,180 people, 1,180 households, and 940 families residing in the township. The population density was 155.6 inhabitants per square mile (60.1/km2). There were 1,243 housing units at an average density of 60.8 per square mile (23.5/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 97.20% White, 0.41% African American, 1.07% Asian, 0.03% Pacific Islander, 0.22% from other races, and 1.07% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.79% of the population.[43][44]

There were 1,180 households, out of which 32.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 72.3% were married couples living together, 5.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.3% were non-families. 17.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 8.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.69 and the average family size was 3.03.[43][44]

In the township the population was spread out, with 25.2% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 21.9% from 25 to 44, 32.9% from 45 to 64, and 16.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 91.9 males.[43][44]

The median income for a household in the township was $111,297, and the median income for a family was $128,719. Males had a median income of $95,737 versus $57,308 for females. The per capita income for the township was $72,689. None of the families and 1.1% of the population were living below the poverty line, including none under eighteen and 3.3% of those over 64.[43][44]

Government

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Local government

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Harding Township is governed under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government, one of 141 municipalities (of the 564 statewide) that use this form, the second-most commonly used form of government in the state.[46] The Township Committee is comprised of five members, who are elected directly by the voters at-large in partisan elections to serve three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election in a three-year cycle.[7][47] At an annual reorganization meeting held during the first week of January, the Township Committee selects one of its members to serve as Mayor and another as Deputy Mayor, each serving terms of one year.[3]

Eleven standing committees are appointed at the reorganization meeting including planning, zoning and legal; finance and insurance; public safety; public works and building; personnel; recreation commission; freeholder liaison; Glen Alpin Steering liaison; school board liaison; open space liaison; and board of health liaison. Two members of the township committee serve on each standing committee and provide oversight to the departments.

As of 2023, members of the Harding Township Committee are Mayor Timothy D. Jones (R, term on committee ends December 31, 2024; term as mayor ends 2023), Deputy Mayor Rita Chipperson (R, term on committee and as deputy mayor ends 2023), Nicole Lacz (R, 2024), Nicolas Platt (R, 2025) and Christopher M. Yates (R, 2023).[3][48][49][50][51][52][53]

Federal, state and county representation

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Harding Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[54] and is part of New Jersey's 25th state legislative district.[55]

For the 118th United States Congress, New Jersey's 11th congressional district is represented by Mikie Sherrill (D, Montclair).[56] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[57] and Bob Menendez (Englewood Cliffs, term ends 2025).[58][59]

For the 2024-2025 session, the 25th legislative district of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Anthony M. Bucco (R, Boonton Township) and in the General Assembly by Christian Barranco (R, Jefferson Township) and Aura K. Dunn (R, Mendham Borough).[60]

Morris County is governed by a Board of County Commissioners composed of seven members who are elected at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either one or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election.[61] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator Deena Leary.[62]: 8  As of 2024, Morris County's Commissioners are:

John Krickus (R, Chatham Township, 2024),[63] Director Christine Myers (R, Harding, 2025),[64] Douglas Cabana (R, Boonton Township, 2025),[65] Thomas J. Mastrangelo (R, Montville, 2025),[66] Deputy Director Stephen H. Shaw (R, Mountain Lakes, 2024),[67] Deborah Smith (R, Denville, 2024)[68] and Tayfun Selen (R, Chatham Township, 2026)[62]: 2 [69]

The county's constitutional officers are: Clerk Ann F. Grossi (R, Parsippany–Troy Hills, 2028),[70][71] Sheriff James M. Gannon (R, Boonton Township, 2025)[72][73] and Surrogate Heather Darling (R, Roxbury, 2024).[74][75]

Politics

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As of March 2011, there were a total of 3,025 registered voters in Harding Township, of which 466 (15.4%) were registered as Democrats, 1,443 (47.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,115 (36.9%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There was one voter registered to another party.[76]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 70.4% of the vote (1,607 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 28.6% (654 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (22 votes), among the 2,295 ballots cast by the township's 3,195 registered voters (12 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 71.8%.[77][78] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 61.9% of the vote (1,516 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 36.7% (898 votes) and other candidates with 0.9% (23 votes), among the 2,449 ballots cast by the township's 3,139 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.0%.[79] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 66.8% of the vote (1,618 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 32.1% (778 votes) and other candidates with 0.7% (20 votes), among the 2,421 ballots cast by the township's 3,040 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 79.6.[80]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 82.0% of the vote (1,193 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 16.6% (242 votes), and other candidates with 1.3% (19 votes), among the 1,476 ballots cast by the township's 3,200 registered voters (22 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 46.1%.[81][82] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 68.4% of the vote (1,280 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 20.5% (384 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 10.5% (197 votes) and other candidates with 0.3% (5 votes), among the 1,871 ballots cast by the township's 3,099 registered voters, yielding a 60.4% turnout.[83]

Education

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The Harding Township School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through eighth grade at Harding Township School.[84][85] As of the 2021–22 school year, the district, comprised of one school, had an enrollment of 299 students and 41.2 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 7.3:1.[86]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Madison High School in Madison, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Madison Public Schools.[87][88] As of the 2021–22 school year, the high school had an enrollment of 839 students and 69.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.1:1.[89]

Historic district

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The Tempe Wick Road–Washington Corners Historic District is a 353-acre (143 ha) historic district located in Harding Township and Mendham Township. It extends along Tempe Wick Road from Mount Kemble Avenue to Cold Hill Road, and short segments of Corey Lane, Cemetery Road, Kennaday Road, Leddell Road, and Jockey Hollow Road. Tempe Wick Road is named for Temperance Wick.

The district was added to the National Register of Historic Places on August 25, 2000, for its significance in architecture and military history. The district includes 44 contributing buildings, 6 contributing sites, 10 contributing structures, and 4 contributing objects.[90]

Transportation

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Interstate 287 southbound in Harding Township

Roads and highways

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As of May 2010, the township had a total of 47.82 miles (76.96 km) of roadways, of which 26.48 miles (42.62 km) were maintained by the municipality, 14.69 miles (23.64 km) by Morris County and 6.65 miles (10.70 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[91]

Interstate 287 is the most prominent highway within Harding Township, though there are no exits within the township. The nearest exits, 30 and 33, are both just outside the township in neighboring Bernards Township and Morris Township, respectively. U.S. Route 202 is the main highway providing local access to Harding Township.

Public transportation

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Many Harding residents commute to jobs in Manhattan. There are private van shuttles that make the 45-minute trip to Jersey City or Hoboken, where ferries and PATH make the short journey across the Hudson River to Lower Manhattan. Additionally, many residents use the Madison, Morristown, and other nearby train stations to commute to Midtown Manhattan.[92]

NJ Transit had provided local bus service on the MCM8 route until 2010, when subsidies were eliminated to the local service provider as part of budget cuts.[93][94][95]

Notable people

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Justin Gimelstob

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Harding Township include:

References

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  1. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ a b c Township Committee, Harding Township. Accessed April 26, 2023. "Harding Township operates under the Township form of New Jersey municipal government. The Township Committee is comprised of five members, elected by the public in partisan elections for three-year terms of office on a staggered schedule, with one or two seats coming up for election each year.... At the annual Reorganization meeting held in January, the Mayor is elected by the committee from among its members."
  4. ^ 2023 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, updated February 8, 2023. Accessed February 10, 2023. As of date accessed, Jones is listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2024, which is the end of his three-year committee term, not his one-year mayoral term of office.
  5. ^ Administration, Harding Township. Accessed April 26, 2023.
  6. ^ Clerk, Harding Township. Accessed April 26, 2023.
  7. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 95.
  8. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Harding, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 5, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Total Population: Census 2010 - Census 2020 New Jersey Municipalities, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  10. ^ a b Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2020 to July 1, 2023, United States Census Bureau, released May 2024. Accessed May 16, 2024.
  11. ^ a b Population Density by County and Municipality: New Jersey, 2020 and 2021, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed March 1, 2023.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for New Vernon, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for New Vernon, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 11, 2013.
  15. ^ a b U.S. Census website, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  16. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed April 1, 2022.
  17. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  18. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 193. Accessed May 28, 2024.
  19. ^ Staff. Acts of the One Hundred and Forty-Sixth Legislature of the State of New Jersey, pp. 74-77. New Jersey Secretary of State, 1922. Accessed October 17, 2015. "Chapter 40 - An Act to incorporate the township of Harding, in the county of Morris"
  20. ^ Historical Timeline of Morris County Boundaries Archived December 25, 2016, at the Wayback Machine, Morris County Library. Accessed December 24, 2016. "1922, September 1. Harding Township is established from Passaic. The township includes sections Green Village and New Vernon. From PL 1923, p. 587."
  21. ^ a b c d e DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Harding township, Morris County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  22. ^ a b Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Harding township Archived 2015-05-30 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  23. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed May 1, 2023.
  24. ^ Lawlor, Julia. "If You're Thinking of Living In/Harding Township, N.J.; Open Space, Scenic Beauty, Pricey Homes", The New York Times, November 3, 2002. Accessed October 7, 2020. "In the Mount Kemble Lake area, a summer vacation community developed in 1928, small cottages on 9,000-square-foot lots have been converted to year-round homes surrounding one of Harding's two lakes."
  25. ^ Brochure, Mount Kemble Lake. Accessed October 7, 2020. "Established in 1926, Mt. Kemble Lake is an unusual mix of privately owned homes and community owned assets, with a deep sense of volunteerism and community pride."
  26. ^ Waggoner, Walter H. "Town With 3‐Acre Zoning Minimum Ordered to Allow Garden Apartments", The New York Times, July 6, 1973. Accessed October 7, 2020. "Harding Township, just south of Morristown, has been called 'the Garden of Eden of Morris County' by County Judge Jacques H. Gascoyne, and it is one of the most restrictive and elegant of New Jersey's residential suburban areas."
  27. ^ Garbarine, Rachelle. "In the Region/New Jersey; A Patient Family Becomes a Careful Developer", The New York Times, April 5, 1998. Accessed October 7, 2020. "The broad swath of meadows, hayfields and thick woods is among the last large estates and working farms in this affluent Morris County township."
  28. ^ Median Household, Family, Per-Capita Income: State, County, Municipality and Census Designated Place (CDP) With Municipalities Ranked by Per Capita Income; 2010 5-year ACS estimates Archived 2014-09-10 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed December 2, 2019.
  29. ^ Cervenka, Susanne. "Rich in New Jersey: Here are the 50 wealthiest towns in the state. Is yours one of them?", Asbury Park Press, July 1, 2019. Accessed October 7, 2020. "6. Harding County: Morris County Median household income: $183,587 Percent making more than $200,000: 47%"
  30. ^ The Most Expensive ZIP Codes 2006 Archived November 18, 2018, at the Wayback Machine, Forbes magazine April 21, 2006
  31. ^ New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places - Morris County, New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection Historic Preservation Office, updated October 1, 2020. Accessed October 7, 2020.
  32. ^ Census Reporter: Harding township, Morris County, NJ.
  33. ^ a b c Garbarine, Rachelle. "If You're Thinking of Living in: Harding", The New York Times, June 10, 1990. Accessed February 28, 2008. "Among its residents are William E. Simon, the former Secretary of the Treasury, and Robert P. Luciano, the chairman of Schering-Plough, the pharmaceutical company."
  34. ^ Washington, Gregory C. "Town snapshot: Harding", The Star-Ledger, November 30, 2006. Accessed August 2, 2007. "When concluded, Passaic Township was cut in half and the northern half was named after the sitting president of the United States, Warren G. Harding."
  35. ^ Bloom, Susan. "Harding Township re-dedicates municipal building", Daily Record, December 8, 2014. "In 1922, they seceded from Passaic Township, named their new town after then-sitting President Warren Harding, and never looked back."
  36. ^ Staff. "Harding Township", Observer Tribune. Accessed September 11, 2013. "The desire to preserve Harding's rural character was evident even in 1928 when an unusual private land preservation effort began with the New Vernon Neighborhood Restrictive Agreement."
  37. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed May 21, 2015.
  38. ^ Areas touching Harding Township, MapIt. Accessed March 13, 2022.
  39. ^ Morris County Municipalities Map, Morris County, New Jersey Department of Planning and Preservation. Accessed February 23, 2020.
  40. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  41. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 717. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  42. ^ Table 6: New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1940 - 2000, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, August 2001. Accessed May 1, 2023.
  43. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Harding township, Morris County, New Jersey Archived 2015-05-30 at the Wayback Machine, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  44. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Harding township, Morris County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  45. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Harding township, Morris County, New Jersey Archived 2020-02-12 at archive.today, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 2, 2012.
  46. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed June 1, 2023.
  47. ^ "Forms of Municipal Government in New Jersey", p. 7. Rutgers University Center for Government Studies. Accessed June 1, 2023.
  48. ^ 2023 Municipal Data Sheet, Harding Township. Accessed April 26, 2023.
  49. ^ Morris County Manual 2024, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed May 1, 2024.
  50. ^ Morris County Municipal Elected Officials For The Year 2024, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk, updated March 20, 2024. Accessed May 1, 2024.
  51. ^ General Election November 8, 2022, Official Results, Morris County, New Jersey, updated November 28, 2022. Accessed January 1, 2023.
  52. ^ General Election Winners For November 2, 2021, Morris County, New Jersey Clerk. Accessed January 1, 2022.
  53. ^ General Election 2020 November 3, 2020 Summary Report Official Results, Morris County, New Jersey, updated November 20, 2020. Accessed January 1, 2021.
  54. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  55. ^ Municipalities Sorted by 2023-2031 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed September 1, 2023.
  56. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  57. ^ U.S. Sen. Cory Booker cruises past Republican challenger Rik Mehta in New Jersey, PhillyVoice. Accessed April 30, 2021. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  58. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
  59. ^ Home, sweet home: Bob Menendez back in Hudson County. nj.com. Accessed April 30, 2021. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  60. ^ Legislative Roster for District 25, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 18, 2024.
  61. ^ Board of County Commissioners, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022. "Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of County Commissioners, who serve three-year terms."
  62. ^ a b Morris County Manual 2022, Morris County Clerk. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  63. ^ Tayfun Selen, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  64. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  65. ^ Douglas R. Cabana, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  66. ^ Thomas J. Mastrangelo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  67. ^ Stephen H. Shaw, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  68. ^ Deborah Smith, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  69. ^ Commissioners, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  70. ^ Ann F. Grossi, Esq., Office of the Morris County Clerk. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  71. ^ Clerks, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  72. ^ About Us: Sheriff James M. Gannon, Morris County Sheriff's Office. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  73. ^ Sheriffs, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  74. ^ Surrogate Heather J. Darling, Esq., Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  75. ^ Surrogates, Constitutional Officers Association of New Jersey. Accessed June 1, 2022.
  76. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Morris, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 18, 2012.
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  78. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Morris County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  79. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  80. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Morris County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 18, 2012.
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  83. ^ 2009 Governor: Morris County Archived 2012-10-17 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  84. ^ Harding Township Board of Education District Policy - Identification, Harding Township School District. Accessed January 29, 2020. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through eight in the Harding Township School District. Composition: The Harding Township School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Harding Township."
  85. ^ School Performance Reports for the Harding Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed April 1, 2024.
  86. ^ District information for Harding Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  87. ^ Madison High School 2016 Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed November 30, 2017. "Madison High School also enjoys the benefits of our sending-receiving relationship with Harding Township, a nearby K-8 school district. Students from Harding and Madison become a cohesive class in their four years together."
  88. ^ Master Plan Housing Element & Fair Share Plan, Harding Township, adopted November 17, 2008. Accessed January 29, 2020. "The Harding Township School system is governed by an elected Board of Education comprised of five members, one of whom also serves on the Madison Board of Education, and is administered by a full-time Superintendent. The Harding Township School, located in New Vernon Village, is comprised of an elementary and middle school (kindergarten through eighth grade) with an on-site Principal/Director of Curriculum. Secondary school education for Harding’s children is provided through an agreement with Madison High School."
  89. ^ School data for Madison High School, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed December 1, 2022.
  90. ^ Bertland, Dennis; Bishop, Sally (August 1999). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory/Nomination: Tempe Wick Road--Washington Corners Historic District". National Park Service. With accompanying 73 photos
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  92. ^ Capuzzo, Jill P. "Harding Township, N.J.: A Historic Place That Feels Like the Country", The New York Times, March 27, 2019. Accessed November 26, 2020. "Driving into Manhattan, about 35 miles east, during rush hour can take over an hour. Harding does not have its own train station, so commuters take New Jersey Transit trains from stations in Bernardsville, Morristown, Madison or Chatham."
  93. ^ Morris County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed December 2, 2014.
  94. ^ NJ Transit Restructures Morris County Bus Service; Four current 'MCM' routes will be expanded to six new bus routes, NJ Transit, September 13, 2010. Accessed August 7, 2015.
  95. ^ Morris County System Map Archived June 19, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, NJ Transit. Accessed August 7, 2015.
  96. ^ Kamin, Arthur Z. "State Becomes a Part of Celebrating Marconi's Achievements", The New York Times, October 23, 1994. Accessed December 2, 2012. "One of the council members is from New Jersey -- Dr. William O. Baker of New Vernon, the retired chairman of AT&T Bell Laboratories at Murray Hill."
  97. ^ "William O. Baker stood with presidents", New Jersey Hills, November 4, 2005. Accessed December 2, 2019. "It was 1961. New Vernon resident and scientist William Oliver Baker stood with President John F. Kennedy in the oval office."
  98. ^ "James J. Barry receives Award of Achievement", The Bernardsville News, March 26, 2012.Accessed December 2, 2019. "James J. Barry Jr. of Harding, a trustee and former president of the Washington Association of New Jersey (WANJ), was awarded the association’s prestigious Award of Achievement at the association’s annual meeting and luncheon on President’s Day, Monday, Feb. 20, at the Madison Hotel, Convent Station."
  99. ^ Michelle Cesan, Princeton Tigers. Accessed October 24, 2020. "High School: Oak Knoll School; Hometown: Harding, N.J."
  100. ^ Patterson, Mary Jo. "Local Man, Global Mission: Philanthropist Ray Chambers was appointed Special Envoy for malaria by the United Nation Secretary General in 2008, but he hasn't forgotten his humble Newark beginnings.", New Jersey Monthly, March 15, 2010. Accessed May 30, 2011. "Of all the causes Chambers has embraced, eradicating malaria has proved the most consuming. Last year, he spent only one week at his retreat in the Arizona desert, one of his and wife Patti's four homes. (The others are in New Vernon, Manhattan, and California.)"
  101. ^ Wehrum, Kasey. "Special Report: Wayfair's Road to $1 Billion Wayfair was founded with one goal in mind: to get as big as possible. Next stop: $1 billion.", Inc., April 3, 2012. Accessed October 31, 2019. "Conine grew up in New Vernon, New Jersey, and his mother owned two stores that sold outdoor furniture."
  102. ^ Coons, Philip. "Former Duke men's lacrosse great Ned Crotty returns to Durham as assistant coach", The Chronicle, February 23, 2018. Accessed December 2, 2019. "Crotty, a New Vernon, N.J., native, is fifth on the career Duke points list with 239."
  103. ^ Bataille, Larry. About Archived January 27, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, Hartley Farms. Accessed June 16, 2013.
  104. ^ Senior Staff, Governor of New Jersey. Accessed June 23, 2015. "In local government, Egea was elected in 2008 to her first term as a Committee Member in Harding Township (Morris) serving from 2009-2011 including Deputy Mayor in 2010 and 2011."
  105. ^ Condon, Mike. "Regina Egea resigns from Harding Township Committee", Observer-Tribune, January 27, 2012. Accessed June 23, 2015. "Citing work and family commitments, Township Committeewoman Regina Egea resigned her seat on the committee Thursday night."
  106. ^ Fried, Joseph P. "Peter Frelinghuysen Jr., 95, Former Congressman, Dies", The New York Times, May 23, 2011. Accessed December 2, 2019. "Peter H. B. Frelinghuysen Jr., one in a long line of family members to represent New Jersey in Congress and a leader in the successful fight to block an airport proposed for the state’s Great Swamp wildlife area, died on Monday at his home in Harding Township, N.J. He was 95."
  107. ^ Solomon, Nancy. "Political Winds Leave New Jersey Lawmaker Caught Between Party and Home", The New York Times, May 29, 2017. Accessed December 2, 2019. "Mr. Frelinghuysen’s 11th Congressional District, which includes Morris County and parts of Essex, Passaic and Sussex Counties, is what New Jerseyans call Republican horse country. It is one of the richest and most highly educated districts in the country, and the estates in Mr. Frelinghuysen’s hometown, Harding Township, make it one of the 25 richest ZIP codes in America, according to Forbes magazine."
  108. ^ Staff. "Sports People: Tennis; Gimelstob Takes Shot at the Pros", The New York Times, May 16, 1996. Accessed June 23, 2015. "The first pro tournament for the 19-year-old U.C.L.A. sophomore from Harding Township, N.J., will be the Stella Artois Grass Court Championships in London in June."
  109. ^ Goldstein, Richard. "Barry Halper, Baseball Memorabilia Collector, Dies at 66", The New York Times, December 20, 2005. Accessed December 2, 2019. "Barry Halper, who began collecting autographs as an 8-year-old hanging around the Yankees' minor league ballpark in Newark and went on to assemble the nation's most acclaimed private collection of baseball memorabilia, died Sunday at a hospital in Livingston, N.J. Mr. Halper, who lived in New Vernon, N.J., was 66."
  110. ^ Board of Trustees, The Land Conservancy of New Jersey, backed up by the Internet Archive as of August 27, 2011. Accessed September 8, 2015. "Kerry Kittles is a retired professional basketball player with the New Jersey Nets.... Kerry lives in Harding Township with his wife, Adria and their three daughters."
  111. ^ "New York Jets coach buys $4M Harding Twp. home", Daily Record, July 31, 2008. Accessed August 21, 2008.
  112. ^ "Josephine S. Margetts, Assemblywoman, 87", The New York Times, March 7, 1989. Accessed September 11, 2022. "Josephine S. Margetts, a former three-term Republican Assemblywoman from Morris County, N.J., died Friday at her home in Harding Township. She was 87 years old."
  113. ^ Staff. "Two BYU Alumni Win Dissertation Awards" Archived 2008-02-12 at the Wayback Machine, Marriott Alumni Magazine, Winter 2008. Accessed November 23, 2008. "In addition, Oates leads community initiatives such as the New Jersey Hall of Fame and the Teach Our Children Foundation, an organization committed to educating inner-city children. He and his wife, Michelle, have three children and live in Harding, New Jersey."
  114. ^ Havsy, Jane. "'A dream and a goal:' Morgan Pearson to compete in Olympic triathlon", Daily Record, July 19, 2021. Accessed August 31, 2021. "'For me, (the Olympics) was the pinnacle of sports,' said Pearson, who grew up in the New Vernon section of Harding and now lives in Boulder, Colorado."
  115. ^ Staff. "Joseph Sullivan, 63; Led Turnpike Unit", The New York Times, March 16, 2000. Accessed December 30, 2017. "Joseph Sullivan, a New Jersey businessman who ran for governor and later served as chairman of the New Jersey Turnpike Authority, died Monday at a hospital in Morristown, N.J. He was 63.... Mr. Sullivan, who lived in New Vernon, N.J., spent $1 million of his own money and came in third in the Republican primary in 1981, behind Thomas Kean, who became governor, and former Paterson Mayor Lawrence Kramer."
  116. ^ Saxon, Jamie. "A Real Life Eloise Calls the Heldrich Hotel Home", Princeton Info, November 12, 2008. Accessed December 2, 2019. "When Kim Clearwater married Jim Weaver, owner and chef of Tre Piani and Tre Bar in 2006 and they started looking for a house together, she was turning the pages of a local newspaper and came upon an interview with Fred Hill, head coach of Rutgers’ basketball.... Weaver’s love of cooking started as a child growing up with two younger sisters in New Vernon in Morris County, in a home designed and built by his father, who ran his own large architectural firm and loved to cook and entertain."
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